More information leaks about Microsoft's fitness-focused smartwatch

A new report claims Microsoft's upcoming fitness-focused wearable watch will feature a blood-glucose monitor and UV sensor, putting the wearable device in line with the technology that will reportedly be found in Apple's upcoming smartwatch.

According to a report by the International Business Times, the UV sensor will "help warn the user of harmful levels of ultraviolet radiation from sunlight," while the blood-glucose monitor will aid users with diabetes while also tracking fitness-related variables. The report reiterates previous leaks that the sensor will launch late this year and will be compatible across a range of ecosystems, such as Android, iOS and Windows. 

Previous reports indicated the watch will include at least 11 sensors and arrive in October. In May, Microsoft applied for a patent for a wearable "portable information device" with the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office. The application noted that the device will feature several sensors, some of which will measure biometric data. More recently, a report indicated the device will focus more on fitness than current smartwatches, with the device described as having a "wristband" form factor, though it will still be capable of displaying the time.

Despite the leaks, little is actually known about the appearance of the device. It's been reported that the display won't be on the wrist area facing a user, but rather on palm side of the device.

Source: International Business Times | Image via U.S. Patent & Trademark Office

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21 Comments

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Scabrat said,
Apple and Microsoft are teaming up for the watch. There is not two watches, just one watch... ;)

Geez, I hope not. What would they call it, Microapp watch

warwagon said,
Only thing I want out of a smart watch is text messages on my wrist when i'm walking or mowing with headphones on.
yes, I'm in the lawn care biz. I use headphones when on the mower. It would be nice to look at my wrist to see who is calling or to see what my glucose level.

If you're diabetic, this could be vital information. ;-)

But all these health related gizmos will end up as small information centers being able to show a wealth of information about your current health status.
Heart rate, blood pressure, glucce/oxygen bloodlevels, daily activity, calories burned etc .

I can see certain people with ilnesses wearing these things all day, and having a direct link to a doctor or hospital when things go wrong.

And there will be a difference between a smart watch and health device, one is a extension to your phone, the other a monitoring device.

Not a watch, but I started to use the Bing Fitness/gps tracking feature on my phone to register my walks. It's nice to see the route walked, how many miles and calories burned. It makes you want to go quicker, further. With a watch there's even more information, and I can imagen it will help keeping yourself fit.

Very interested in what is coming out the next coming months/year.

Dutchie64 said,
If you're diabetic, this could be vital information. ;-)

But all these health related gizmos will end up as small information centers being able to show a wealth of information about your current health status.
Heart rate, blood pressure, glucce/oxygen bloodlevels, daily activity, calories burned etc .

I can see certain people with ilnesses wearing these things all day, and having a direct link to a doctor or hospital when things go wrong.

And there will be a difference between a smart watch and health device, one is a extension to your phone, the other a monitoring device.

Not a watch, but I started to use the Bing Fitness/gps tracking feature on my phone to register my walks. It's nice to see the route walked, how many miles and calories burned. It makes you want to go quicker, further. With a watch there's even more information, and I can imagen it will help keeping yourself fit.

Very interested in what is coming out the next coming months/year.


I have no health issue that i need to monitor but I would still be interested in this. It's tracking your levels all the time and supposedly will feed back to an app. In the app I can see how my levels have been effected by my actions and my intake providing a hell of an insight into what my body is doing and how its responding to things. If it could tell the tine as well then I'm sold.

I wonder when Microsoft submitted the glucose sensor to the FDA? The FDA takes a long time to approve products, can take years unless ms pays them off to speed up the process.

Dot Matrix said,
And, again, who are these devices targeting?

people that are actively into fitness and want to see more data to help them along with this, or people with Diabetes or just anyone that might like to know a little more about their bodies and how diet effects levels......just a guess?

Dot Matrix said,
And, again, who are these devices targeting?
If they support all mobile platforms... I know fitness services will love these.

techbeck said,
What, not called a wrist band anymore?
I called it a smartwatch in the article because a wristband is a form factor, while a watch is a device. A watch or fitness device can have a wristband form factor.

I am curious as to why smart watches don't use the flexible screen technologies that we are seeing more and more often. Lots of focus these days on health + fitness, which I quite like. It'll be interesting to see what this offers, and Apple's rumored smartwatch.

I am curious as to why smart watches don't use the flexible screen technologies that we are seeing more and more often. Lots of focus these days on health + fitness, which I quite like. It'll be interesting to see what this offers, and Apple's rumored smartwatch.

May be durability issues in addition to non-flexible components and pricing. Flexibility makes it more difficult to seal the device against environmental insult like water and dust. Some materials, like the batteries or circuit boards may also come in flexible versions but not be as resilient compared to the non-flexible versions, especially when put up against repetitive cycles of strain. The flexible material may also not be pliable enough to make into a comfortable device that a user can wear all day e.g. it doesn't want to mold into a specific shape - rather it wants to snap back into its original shape constantly.

Finally, I'm skeptical that making a sufficiently durable flexible device would allow these prototypes to be marketed at a palatable price point.