More Microsoft Office 2013 SKU pricing revealed

As we await official word from Microsoft on when Office 2013 will go on sale to the general public, more information has been revealed about the pricing for more SKU builds of the new version of the productivity software suite.

Microsoft announced several months ago that the Home and Student version of Office 2013 would be released as a stand alone product for $139.99 and would contain Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and OneNote. Office 2013 Home and Business will cost $219.99 and will have Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote, and Outlook. Office 2013 Professional will cost $399.99 and will have Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote, Outlook, Publisher, and Access.

Today, ZDNet.com reports that they received a leaked Microsoft marketing slide which shows two more Office 2013 SKUs. One is Office Standard 2013 which is priced on the slide at $369. The other is Office Professional Plus 2013 which has the very high price point of $499.

It's not clear what will be included in these final two SKUs. However, the article claims they are for "volume licensees only", meaning they are meant to be sold to large businesses which are able to buy more than just one license.

People and businesses who subscribe to Microsoft's Office 365 cloud service will also gain access to versions of Office 2013 when they are launched, with prices ranging from $3.30 a month for Office 365 University to $20 a month for Office 365 Enterprise and Government.

Source: ZDNet.com | Image via ZDNet.com/Microsoft

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Captain Obvious: Skype may be included in next Xbox

Next Story

WP8 "Portico" update rolling out to AT&T HTC 8X and T-Mobile Lumia 810

24 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

This version I can skip till some editions down the line the Metro style disappears. The design is so hideous, hurts my eyes.

Oh, I get it. You've not actually used it, just seen pictures of it!!!

The Metro style won't disappear in a hurry so you'd better get used to it.

I still wonder that both "home" versions seems to me are not equal. The 365 Home contain Acces and Publisher, but only the 2013 professional contain it?

Buying the full suite is a one-time purchase, and at $139 is far less over the course of 3 years than Microsoft would receive from you if you went with the Office 365 Home Premium edition ($8.33/month). After 3 years (which is about the time frame of each Office release), Microsoft will have made $139 off of that Office 2013 Home purchase. The same user buying O365 Home Premium makes Microsoft approximately $300, which is not too far off from what Office 2013 Standard costs, and with the same products included (minus Access for 2013 Standard). Also, O365 Home Premium has a 5-device installation license for up to 5 PCs and mobile devices used by that user or his/her home, whereas O2013 Standard has a 2-device install license). O2013 Standard has Terminal Server use rights, commercial licensing for Office Web Apps, and rights to corporate usage of Office 2013 on Windows RT, but a home user isn't likely to need any of that. If a user goes with O365 Home Premium versus purchasing the full Office Home suite, they're getting more products, more licenses, and additional perks, but Microsoft also makes more money off of that user in the 3 year window than it would otherwise. The user gets far more than what they'd get for $139, and I think the perks and licenses are worth the additional cost, but Microsoft isn't doing these things out of the good of their hearts either, and want to try to make some additional revenue here.

Office 365 Home Premium is basically the same as Office 2013 Standard in terms of the actual product you acquire, but O365 Home Premium has the additional licenses for your home PCs or mobile devices, additional SkyDrive space, Office Web Apps usage, and minutes on Skype. Users will now have to determine if those additional features, products, and perks are worth an extra $54 or so a year more, over 3 years, than they would have spent on Office 2013 Home if it was spread out over 3 years.

Can someone let me know if Office 2013 is a worthy upgrade from 2010? Also, is the UI made to look good on Windows 8 or does it also look good on Windows 7. I am running Windows 7 and didn't upgrade to Windows 8 because there just wasn't enough to sway me. Thanks!

It really depends on what you use within the Office Suite.... for me, the new Outlook Caching options (ability to only cache 3 months of mail) and Excel Flash Fill make it worth while... if these aren't of interest the majority of other changes are either performance related or minor cosmetic tweaks to UI.... there are some nice features such as your local Weather in Outlook, and Tagged People Calendars etc..... but are these worth the cost of upgrade from 2010? In my opinion not for a consumer... for Business maybe, as staying evergreen has its own benefits..

Hope this helps.

Forgot to mention.... Yes works well on Windows 7, and User Interface does work with classic Start Menu... lack of Metro doesnt impact UI or Performance...

dmd83 said,
It really depends on what you use within the Office Suite.... for me, the new Outlook Caching options (ability to only cache 3 months of mail) and Excel Flash Fill make it worth while... if these aren't of interest the majority of other changes are either performance related or minor cosmetic tweaks to UI.... there are some nice features such as your local Weather in Outlook, and Tagged People Calendars etc..... but are these worth the cost of upgrade from 2010? In my opinion not for a consumer... for Business maybe, as staying evergreen has its own benefits..

Hope this helps.

dmd83 said,
Forgot to mention.... Yes works well on Windows 7, and User Interface does work with classic Start Menu... lack of Metro doesnt impact UI or Performance...


Thanks for the help!

Because Outlook is more than just an email client (yes, it does that primarily, but it also does calendaring, tasks, contact management, and has corporate connectivity options as well). Office Home and Business isn't *that* much more than the Home SKU, and if you really need outlook, I don't think $80 is all that much to ask (just my opinion, but as an Outlook devotee, I find it worth the price).

You could always go with one of the Office 365 SKUs - 365 Home Premium is less than $9 a month and comes with Outlook (and a few other things only found in the higher-end SKUs like Access and Publisher). Failing that, Outlook.com isn't a bad option either, honestly.

Ezekiel Carsella said,
#stupid. i mean really i want 2013 but i am scared it expires today and we have to still pony up $100 + for it?

#thisisneowinnottwitter

Cool it, I'm kidding.