More rumors and leaks about Google's Android TV plans pop up

Remember Google TV? It's pretty obvious that Google wants everyone to forget this rather massive failure to create an Internet connected operating system for televisions and set-top boxes. In October, rumors that the company was rebranding Google TV to Android TV started showing up.

Now The Verge claims it has obtained internal documents that describe just what Google has in mind for Android TV. The story says that while Google TV was trying to turn a TV into a PC or smartphone, the idea behind Android TV is strictly about offering entertainment to the consumer.

The article comes with UI concepts for Android TV, which make it look a bit like the Xbox One's interface. The story says that movies, TV shows, apps and even games will be displayed in the UI, which suggests that Android TV devices will be similar to what Amazon introduced this week with their Fire TV set top box (also based on the Android OS).

The article states that Google is contacting third party app and game developers to port their creations to Android TV. Google is already selling its Chromecast dongle that streams content from a smartphone or tablet to a PC. Today's article says that even though Android TV is in development, Chromecast is not going away.

The big question is whether or not Google will license Android TV to third party hardware companies, as it did with Google TV, or make its own hardware that will run the platform. There's also no word on when Android TV will make its debut.

Source: The Verge | Image via The Verge

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Note to John Callaham: Nobody is holding anything against Google for Google TV. If that was the case, Chromecast would not be as dominant a streaming entertainment device that it is. Nexus TV is totally different concept that Google TV that's because the element of gaming is going to be included. That's a sector in the entertainment sector that is ripe for the taking because of the enormous cost attached to buying a PS4 system and especially the super-expensive Xbox ONE where one actually has to pay a yearly subscription for.

A comment on the language within this article - "story says"/"article says"/"article states" used too often. The whole thing feels like a copy and paste job of The Verge's exclusive, with some minor rewording.

Whilst I loved the concept of Google TV, the issues I found were around stability and usability. One of the major flaws IMO with android is the fragmentation of hardware. Also, the stock OS isn't really TV friendly. One platform doesn't not fit all. I want a device that simply just works!

Ive yet to find a single android powered set top box, dongle or whatever, that does everything, and does it well. Each have their pros and cons.

Ive just purchased a chromecast as its just been officially launched in UK, and love the simplicity of it, but hate the lack of mainstream applications. I also had a geintech atv1200 set top box, but the usability of this was questionable, and it was quite flakey, not really a mainstream device, but then I don't thank any android stb is, other than perhaps of course the market leeaders (roku, sky now... to name a couple).

But even these are lacking key applications.. for example, I don't believe any 1 device offers all of the UK TV On Demand services. Although I have recently read Sky should be offering up ITV's stuff soon, but then, they don't do Netflix (without a hack)!

Until everyone gets on board, its not going to appeal to the masses, especially as Smart TV's cover most of the basics that the average consumer wants.

Zune -> WP 7 -> WP 8 and still less than 3% market share.
Surface -> Surface 2 -> Still a writeoff.
I see what you are saying.

why is Zune in line with WP ? and WP hasiPhone competing marketshare in Europe and better in developing asian/indian markets.

recursive said,
Zune -> WP 7 -> WP 8 and still less than 3% market share.
Surface -> Surface 2 -> Still a writeoff.
I see what you are saying.

Learn what a write-off means first.

elenarie said,

Learn what a write-off means first.

This will not happen as it's a pre-programmed talking point.

recursive said,
Zune -> WP 7 -> WP 8 and still less than 3% market share.
Surface -> Surface 2 -> Still a writeoff.
I see what you are saying.

wp is #2 mobile os in a few major European markets, its close to ios in uk also. Or are we living in 'USA' is all that matters world?

duddit2 said,

wp is #2 mobile os in a few major European markets, its close to ios in uk also. Or are we living in 'USA' is all that matters world?

It's a little under 4% or so worldwide. Part of what makes the number so low is China, where WP is like 1% market share. As you said, in many parts of Europe and South America, WP is competitive with iOS.

We just have to see what happens now with 8.1 and the removal of licensing fees. Hopefully they'll stop doing these exclusive carrier deals in the US too.

david said,
My Nexus 4 has never had malware. It's usually the end user that is at fault.

And yet it isn't always the end user that is at fault.

The early Android malware we were finding was piggybacking on Google App updates like Mail, Gallery, etc.

With the latest release of Android, we still come across malware that works essentially the same way. It works off a botted router between the end user and the Store, and waits for the update bits, and attaches itself and disables Google's rather poorly implemented App verification/CRC processes.

Other nice tricks are embedding malware into a text message that doesn't require any more work than clicking on the notification to infest the device.

I literally just got off a phone call earlier this evening with a friend of my fathers that had malware texting her friends. My techs found the malware came in on a 'verified' official Google App. (Not even a 3rd party App update or install.)


The problem is most malware authors don't announce themselves, so there are a large number of Android device users with malware that have no idea.

Mobius Enigma said,

And yet it isn't always the end user that is at fault.

The early Android malware we were finding was piggybacking on Google App updates like Mail, Gallery, etc.

With the latest release of Android, we still come across malware that works essentially the same way. It works off a botted router between the end user and the Store, and waits for the update bits, and attaches itself and disables Google's rather poorly implemented App verification/CRC processes.


If this were true, it would work on any platform, Apple, windows, etc. But its not of course, and just pure FUD. Every app has a checksum that is checked with Google Play over a https before the app is installed. If the checksum fails, the app wouldn't install. The only way what you say is possible is if a user installs an app from a third-party app store, in which case they are on their own anyway.

Mobius Enigma said,

Other nice tricks are embedding malware into a text message that doesn't require any more work than clicking on the notification to infest the device.

I literally just got off a phone call earlier this evening with a friend of my fathers that had malware texting her friends. My techs found the malware came in on a 'verified' official Google App. (Not even a 3rd party App update or install.)


If this were even remotely possible, it would be a serious security flaw. Yet, no one here has heard of any such cases. Your friend probably has a rooted phone and clicked on links and installed stuff they shouldn't have.

Mobius Enigma said,

The problem is most malware authors don't announce themselves, so there are a large number of Windows Phone device users with malware that have no idea.

See how easy it is when you don't have to back up your statements with proof?

recursive said,

If this were even remotely possible, it would be a serious security flaw. Yet, no one here has heard of any such cases. Your friend probably has a rooted phone and clicked on links and installed stuff they shouldn't have.

Ummm text messages infecting android devices have been widely reported on. even on Neowin a while back. So yeah.

HawkMan said,

Ummm text messages infecting android devices have been widely reported on. even on Neowin a while back. So yeah.

You mean phones getting infected just by receiving a text message? When was that reported?

Was a big issue sometime last year and the year before.

heck even iOS had a sms direct infect vulnerability at some point a few years back.

HawkMan said,
Was a big issue sometime last year and the year before.

heck even iOS had a sms direct infect vulnerability at some point a few years back.

I can't find anything about that.

I only remember something about a DOS which I think was SMS related, but there was no infection in that case anyway.

ichi said,

I can't find anything about that.

I only remember something about a DOS which I think was SMS related, but there was no infection in that case anyway.

Must not have looked very hard... did you Google "iphone sms exploit"?

http://www.forbes.com/2009/07/...ology-security-hackers.html
http://www.wired.com/2009/07/sms-hijack-iphone/

Back in 2009, it was found that a specially crafted and mostly invisible SMS message could completely take over your iPhone... from turning on your camera and microphone, to accessing your pictures and contacts.

The best part? It could then send out the same text messages to your friends to infect them too.

rfirth said,

Must not have looked very hard... did you Google "iphone sms exploit"?

http://www.forbes.com/2009/07/...ology-security-hackers.html
http://www.wired.com/2009/07/sms-hijack-iphone/

Back in 2009, it was found that a specially crafted and mostly invisible SMS message could completely take over your iPhone... from turning on your camera and microphone, to accessing your pictures and contacts.

The best part? It could then send out the same text messages to your friends to infect them too.

But none of those links say anything about infecting Android through SMS, which is what HawkMan stated and which I asked about.

Got my Xboxes and Chromecast so I am good. Dont know what else this would offer me. One thing that sucks about Xbox is the stupid requirement to have Gold in order to use apps like Netflix.

meh, I have chromecast and it does the job. couldn't care less about android TV. Comcast's X1 setup-box has a nice interface with lots of contents already. unless Android TV is something revolutionary which I doubt its better than Amazon FireTV (because of amazon's exclusive access to Amazon instant Video) I don't bother even considering it.

Well I am certain that millions of people world wide already do this with their phones, tablets and various other devices that are powered by Android. I fail to see how this would be different.

Major_Plonquer said,
Changing the name won't change the fact that Android is FAR too insecure to allow anywhere near a home network. Anyone for malware?

Android is too insecure to allow near a home network? Ahahahahahaha

You know the vast majority of Android Malware either relies on the users going into advances settings, ignoring the warnings and ticking "Allow to install from unsigned sources". Or it's in 3rd party App stores outside Google Play.

If you think Android is too insecure to be on a home network what must you think of Windows?

Edited by McKay, Apr 6 2014, 4:43am :

Major_Plonquer said,
Changing the name won't change the fact that Android is FAR too insecure to allow anywhere near a home network. Anyone for malware?

umm, ok

Major_Plonquer said,
Changing the name won't change the fact that Android is FAR too insecure to allow anywhere near a home network.

but its fine for over 80% of the smartphones on the planet?

Major_Plonquer said,
Changing the name won't change the fact that Android is FAR too insecure to allow anywhere near a home network. Anyone for malware?

Speaking of names, you are living up to yours