More Windows 8 Release Preview screenshots leak out

The Windows 8 Release Preview is reportedly just a few more days away from being offered to the general public by Microsoft. Some Internet rumors have claimed the launch date will be this Friday, June 1st. Meanwhile, more screenshots of the 8400 build version are being posted up at the WinUnleaked.tk website.

One of the screenshots shows the pre-installation menu for Windows 8, with the two choices of installing Windows 8 with a PC's current settings or one that offers a clean install of Windows 8.

The other screenshot shows the Windows 8 Release Preview Enterprise version of the Windows Preinstallation Environment, otherwise known as WinPE. This is a lightweight version of the OS that is used mainly for business workstations and servers.

Microsoft has stayed silent, at least officially, on giving out a specific launch date for the Windows 8 Release Preview. The company is also expected to announce an upgrade program for people who purchase a new Windows 7 PC. That program is expected to launch on Saturday, June 2nd. Rumors claim that the program will let new Windows 7 PCs to be upgraded to Windows 8 Pro for $14.99. The reports claim the upgrade program will continue until January 31, 2013.

Source: Winunleaked.tk | Images via WinUnleaked.tk

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The missing installation question:

Disable Metro UI for this installation?
(If you want to enable the Metro UI later on, go to "Customization" in the Control Panel.)

well, at least we know that it will be similar to 7 and i used asp.net AJAX on a website a designed and developed, so it was rough to use windows tech on that website, http://www.seallimo.com that's why people switching to php and apache linux... MS has 2 find a solution for that general performance problem.. i can not imagine that if google develops an operating system..

mzcan99 said,
well, at least we know that it will be similar to 7 and i used asp.net AJAX on a website a designed and developed, so it was rough to use windows tech on that website, http://www.seallimo.com that's why people switching to php and apache linux... MS has 2 find a solution for that general performance problem.. i can not imagine that if google develops an operating system..

I'm not sure what this has to do with Windows 8 Release Preview, but ASP.NET MVC is a much better choice for AJAX-heavy sites. We're using it now with great success at my company.

If I understand correctly, booting from the Windows 8 installation disc now supports in place upgrades? Or is the first screenshot booted from within an existing installation of Windows?

Mr. Dee said,
If I understand correctly, booting from the Windows 8 installation disc now supports in place upgrades? Or is the first screenshot booted from within an existing installation of Windows?

Read a little closer, still says it requires you are in a running version of Windows.

I don't understand all these leaks that show well... nothing... how about leaking something that is new? not just the same old oooh look an install screen... ooh a version screen... etc etc

neufuse said,
I don't understand all these leaks that show well... nothing... how about leaking something that is new? not just the same old oooh look an install screen... ooh a version screen... etc etc

I agree.

neufuse said,
I don't understand all these leaks that show well... nothing... how about leaking something that is new? not just the same old oooh look an install screen... ooh a version screen... etc etc

Maybe because that would require too much Photoshop?

neufuse said,
I don't understand all these leaks that show well... nothing... how about leaking something that is new? not just the same old oooh look an install screen... ooh a version screen... etc etc

I don't understand the "news" articles about leaks that show nothing. I feel cheated when I click on most of the Windows 8 stories on Neowin.

sanctified said,
Somehow I'm deeply concerned about that old regedit icon.

why? it's an icon most people never see... sure I'd LOVE to see a 100% remake of all the system icons and all the icon libraries but MS never seems willing to do that

sanctified said,
Somehow I'm deeply concerned about that old regedit icon.

I believe Microsoft have said that it's no point in changing every single icon if it's hardly used.

sanctified said,
Somehow I'm deeply concerned about that old regedit icon.

Why? It's the same icon that you get on the about screen in the Windows 7 registry editor?

neufuse said,

why? it's an icon most people never see... sure I'd LOVE to see a 100% remake of all the system icons and all the icon libraries but MS never seems willing to do that

I truly believe the refinement of something lies in it's details.

sanctified said,
Somehow I'm deeply concerned about that old regedit icon.

They could at least update it. If you're going to do some, do them all. Why give a half-assed effort?

sanctified said,
Somehow I'm deeply concerned about that old regedit icon.

This!!! how hard is it to change that bloody icon?
Small niggles ultimately add into something bigger.

Apple is slightly better in this.

Northgrove said,
I'd say that regedit is the #1 power user tool, or perhaps #2 after the command line.
GPO is the one for power user, the second one is powershell.
Only nubs use regedit and cmd

sanctified said,

I truly believe the refinement of something lies in it's details.


Indeed. "God is in the detail."
It'd be nice if they could just provide some tools with a quick interface refresh. Shouldn't take long, but it'll make for a consistent experience.

sanctified said,
Somehow I'm deeply concerned about that old regedit icon.

I'm not getting windows 8 cause of that regedit icon lol

sanctified said,
Somehow I'm deeply concerned about that old regedit icon.

I am of the firm belief that things the average consumer shouldn't be in should be scary looking... One easy way to do so is with older, less attractive icons and confusing UI's. I do not even a little understand why anyone with any tech understanding would want these windows to look attractive. All you will end up with is Joe Schmo consumer changing stuff that they don't understand.

Tony. said,

I believe Microsoft have said that it's no point in changing every single icon if it's hardly used.

Sure there's no real reason TO change them. But by that same token, given the ease of changing them, there's no reason NOT to change them either. Hell, they could even get one of their interns to whip up a few new icons and it would take absolute zero development time, while ridding the OS of legacy icons from the Windows 95 era that make it look ugly.

M_Lyons10 said,

I am of the firm belief that things the average consumer shouldn't be in should be scary looking... One easy way to do so is with older, less attractive icons and confusing UI's. I do not even a little understand why anyone with any tech understanding would want these windows to look attractive. All you will end up with is Joe Schmo consumer changing stuff that they don't understand.

I completely agree. It may not be by design but the scariness you refer to is a great side-effect of this icon laziness.

M_Lyons10 said,

I am of the firm belief that things the average consumer shouldn't be in should be scary looking... One easy way to do so is with older, less attractive icons and confusing UI's. I do not even a little understand why anyone with any tech understanding would want these windows to look attractive. All you will end up with is Joe Schmo consumer changing stuff that they don't understand.

Nonsense. There's no reason that editing the registry should be confusing or scary. Regedit should maintain a list of recent changes that can be undone individually; it should reflect modern advancements in UI like the ribbon; it should be able to safely rollback if a change compromises system stability; and it most certainly should have a modern icon. It's a system tool, not an elite status symbol.

To be perfectly honest I'd like to see Microsoft retire the registry. The introduction of Metro apps would have been the perfect opportunity to do that. Apps should be entirely self-contained and you should be able to delete them without worrying about leftover registry settings; heck, many uninstallers don't even properly remove files and registry settings.

theyarecomingforyou said,

Nonsense. There's no reason that editing the registry should be confusing or scary. Regedit should maintain a list of recent changes that can be undone individually; it should reflect modern advancements in UI like the ribbon; it should be able to safely rollback if a change compromises system stability; and it most certainly should have a modern icon. It's a system tool, not an elite status symbol.

To be perfectly honest I'd like to see Microsoft retire the registry. The introduction of Metro apps would have been the perfect opportunity to do that. Apps should be entirely self-contained and you should be able to delete them without worrying about leftover registry settings; heck, many uninstallers don't even properly remove files and registry settings.

Metro apps do NOT have access to the registry except for one specific case. The registry is there for Win32/64 apps only. This is the root of the controversy with FireFox and Chrome, the only Metro app that has access to Win32/64 is IE, FF and Chrome want to call Win32 APIs also but since IE is the only one allowed they are having a fit.

As for getting rid of the registry, if that were to happen then practically every Win32/64 app would break. Then you would have people complaining that MS does not care about backward compatibility, that they are forcing people to upgrade their software, there would be mass switching to Mac, and a bunch of other whining.

As for the icon, I guess people need something to whine about.

sanke1 said,

This!!! how hard is it to change that bloody icon?
Small niggles ultimately add into something bigger.

Apple is slightly better in this.

I dont see apple updating the icons everytime they release a new ipad or iphone.. its the same crap from 5 years ago..

theyarecomingforyou said,

To be perfectly honest I'd like to see Microsoft retire the registry...

Then you clearly don't know what you're talking about. The registry is more powerful than most other "suitable" replacements people put forward, and the idea that it should be retired because idiots abuse it is nonsense.

sanke1 said,
Apple is slightly better in this.

Except for the Windows startup folder icon I haven't been able to find a single legacy icon in OS X. Windows 7 is a different story where you'll find icons from pretty much all releases.

Anthonyd said,
GPO is the one for power user, the second one is powershell.
Only nubs use regedit and cmd

SCCM 2012 is for the power user. . . [etc]

theyarecomingforyou said,

Nonsense. There's no reason that editing the registry should be confusing or scary. Regedit should maintain a list of recent changes that can be undone individually; it should reflect modern advancements in UI like the ribbon; it should be able to safely rollback if a change compromises system stability; and it most certainly should have a modern icon. It's a system tool, not an elite status symbol.

To be perfectly honest I'd like to see Microsoft retire the registry. The introduction of Metro apps would have been the perfect opportunity to do that. Apps should be entirely self-contained and you should be able to delete them without worrying about leftover registry settings; heck, many uninstallers don't even properly remove files and registry settings.


Here we go... There's always at least one wing nut that thinks it's a genius idea to just up and replace the registry... What would you have them replace it with? Ignoring for a minute all the legacy programs you've now made unusable, what would you have them use instead? With all due respect, this is the kind of comment that shows a lack of understanding...

Second, with regards to your first comment that regedit shouldn't be scary to consumers and should be some sort of "inviting settings tool", THAT is nonsense... It goes well beyond providing the ability to rollback... What if they change something that cannot be rolled back? What if they now cannot boot Windows? Regardless of what you think, Regedit IS an elite tool, and the general user should NOT be in there. It most certainly should NOT look like part of explorer that they can play around in...

It is there for knowledgeable people that need it. People that don't care if it's pretty. In fact, if that's your chief concern, you shouldn't be in there.

sanke1 said,

This!!! how hard is it to change that bloody icon?
Small niggles ultimately add into something bigger.

This is a small preview of the mess MS has created when they tried to force an OS designed for smartphones and tablets, to also work equally well for laptops and desktops. Two entirely separate set of needs, requirements, and form factors.
Apple is slightly better in this.