Motorola Xoom Impressions

Motorola's entry into the growing slate market, at first glance, looks like a very sightly competitor to Apple's iPad. The device feels well built with a 10.1 inch screen that is slightly bigger than that of the iPad, and features better screen resolution as well. The demo model that Neowin had a chance to take a look at was Verizon labeled and this seems a little bit troubling. If the device follows the same general pricing policy of the Samsung Galaxy Tab, then this will be one expensive unit that is subsidized and tied to the typically crazy contract plans.

The Xoom is due out Q1 this year and also features micro HDMI and USB for connections. It has two cameras, a 2 megapixel one in the front and a 5 in the back and a hefty battery that promises 10 hours of video per charge.

The Xoom runs Honeycomb (Android 3.0) but the Motorola rep wouldn't let us see anything other than the demo videos, although to be totally truthful the software home button was RIGHT there and we REALLY wanted to press it to take a look.

The device seems like a really solid entry into the market but hopefully it is not crippled or exclusively tied to a contract. The major selling point of iPad is that the price point is lower and it is proven, while Android 3.0 devices are newcomers to the market.

 

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Common peeps. iOS 4 is stale. Icon based mobile OSs are boring and inefficient time hogs. Kudos to Apple for heading the tablet market, but the bar has been significantly raised. The Honeycomb experience is similar to your desktop experience, but it's lightweight and mobile--and obviously w/o a keyboard. The UI blew me away. Yes I enjoy Android, but I'll gladly acknowledge the Android Samsung Galaxy Tabs suck. Wifi only or not, I will purchase this. It's a huge advancement.

I think the only selling point of apple devices is the software. They're really easy to use, since they're made for simple tasks. But other device makers always have better HW specs. Hopefully Android could make them kill the iOS competition.

Agreed, but Android is rapidly catching up in the app department and just about every serious dev ports their apps on both platforms rather than just the iOS. So whatever advantages iOS has right now will be a tough sell once Honeycomb is released. In the long run, hardware will make more and more of a difference as apps become more powerful. Besides, I think most of us are fed up with how Apple thinks ahead on their product designs and then skimp of the features simply for the sake of saving the feature for the next generation release.

Gabureiru said,
I think the only selling point of apple devices is the software. They're really easy to use, since they're made for simple tasks. But other device makers always have better HW specs. Hopefully Android could make them kill the iOS competition.

It's hard to say really as the HW is so closely tied into the sw. Take for example USB, it could be added but iOS wouldn't know what to do with it, unless apple decide to make that change. The only minor gripe would be the low RAM on the iPad, 512MB would have made more sense on launch for the iPad (better for multiple web pages etc..).

Camera wise everything has rolled from the iPhone 4 (i.e. facetime) so i think it's a given that the iPad 2 will have these cameras. However just having a back camera was never a thing i noticed not having on the iPad, it's just to big to use as a camera or video recorder.

The hardware on the iPad i always thought was pretty decent, the A4 processor is very power efficent, fast enough to run iOS games with beautiful graphics (infinity blade and Rage), it is a solid device and feels well made in your hands. The galaxy is nice but has a plastic feel to it.

Ive always found it hard to apply spec's to these devices as they have a lot in common with Consoles, in that compared to a PC the Xbox's low RAM seems a hamstring, but because of the graphic, processor and data IO this is adequate for the console where as a PC would be better with 1GB RAM due to the different method of working.

These devices don't really need to do much in terms of apps, it loads the app and that's it, there's not many background tasks, especially compared to Mac OSX / Windows