Mozilla Labs: Prism

Mozilla Labs is launching a series of experiments to bridge the divide in the user experience between web applications and desktop apps and to explore new usability models as the line between traditional desktop and new web applications continues to blur. Unlike Adobe AIR and Microsoft Silverlight, we're not building a proprietary platform to replace the web. We think the web is a powerful and open platform for this sort of innovation, so our goal is to identify and facilitate the development of enhancements that bring the advantages of desktop apps to the web platform.

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thats css resized stuff (using max-width). different layout engine = different results.
if you have a low screen resolution consider trying a higher one?

shhac said,
thats css resized stuff (using max-width). different layout engine = different results.
if you have a low screen resolution consider trying a higher one?


Using 1280x1024 in a Dell 19" Flat Panel, the machine is a D620.

"Unlike Adobe AIR and Microsoft Silverlight, we’re not building a proprietary platform to replace the web." - because that's what Silverlight is??? I thought these guys (Mozilla) were smart.

It would help if you speak up instead of just bash. What's your problem with the claim?

Silverlight both is a proprietary platform, and can be used to replace websites, like some Flash sites do.
Well, Silverlight do not HAVE to be used like that, but only as a web site component, if that's what you mean.

There are many applications using XUL Runner, including Miro (http://www.getmiro.com) and Joost (http://www.joost.com).

From what I can tell, this is about merging the desktop with the web with using the current web technologies. This makes sense as it is already proven that web apps can act just as well as their desktop counterparts in most applications. So why bother reinventing the wheel and make a new language set, etc, when you have something already very capable of doing the work?

Yay, more web apps on the desktop for no real reason. How many platforms does that bring it to? (including widgets)

billyea said,
Yay, more web apps on the desktop for no real reason. How many platforms does that bring it to? (including widgets)

I do not use a single web app or widget, nor do I have any desire to do so.

Then get ready for all the high-bandwidth ads coming to your desktop. That's what these apps are really about--and maybe subscription fees instead of owning your software.