Mozilla has released Firefox 25

Mozilla has once again released a new version of Firefox a few hours early on its FTP servers. Firefox 25 is now available for download for Windows, Mac and Linux from that location, but will likely launch the latest public build of the web browser on Tuesday via the automatic update feature or on Firefox.com. The Android version of Firefox 25 will also likely become available on Google Play on Tuesday as well.

The FTP download does not have an official change log but the beta version's release notes states that Firefox 25's find bar is no longer shared between tabs. It also states that "Resetting Firefox no longer clears your browsing session" and a new option to "migrate another browser's history and settings" if a user has not access Firefox recently. It's more than possible that the final version of Firefox 25 will have even more new features.

Earlier today, Mozilla confirmed to Neowin that it will continue to support Firefox when used on Microsoft's 12 year old Windows XP operating system for the foreseeable future. We are still awaiting when the version of Firefox that works with the Modern UI of Windows 8 and 8.1 will come out of beta testing. At the moment, it looks like that will happen with Firefox 27, which is due for release in January.

Source: Mozilla via The Next Web

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wingliston said,

Try Firefox UX then.


No need. I already use SeaMonkey (formerly the Mozilla App-Suite). It has a busy UI by default,
but with the same sort of customisation as Firefox, ao its UI can be as busy or dumbed down
as you want it to be. I enjoy the flexibility and variety I get with this amount of customisation.

DJGM said,

All of it. The GUI of Firefox is over-simplified (dumbed down) by default, but that's easily corrected
with Customise, and made to look like a proper browser made for a desktop, not a tablet.


If I want a dumbed down uncustomisable UI, then I'll browse the web on my phone or a tablet.
Oversimplified, dumbed down UI like IE9/10/11 is not suitable for the desktop.

Just what are you on? What else do you need?
Enjoy your clutter then. Browser UIs don't have any right being busy by default, as with any UI in general.

Dot Matrix said,

What part of it needs customized? It's a clean, simple UI.

Then what's the problem ? You can make Firefox UI clean and simple without too much effort.

DJGM said,

No need. I already use SeaMonkey (formerly the Mozilla App-Suite). It has a busy UI by default,
but with the same sort of customisation as Firefox, ao its UI can be as busy or dumbed down
as you want it to be. I enjoy the flexibility and variety I get with this amount of customisation.

Yay!

Let's hear it for Seamonkey!!

Anytime there's a conversation about some programs UI here, it cracks me up! To think so many of you can trash a program because of what the UI looks like is crazy!

I'd really like to know how many of you just set and look at that kind of stuff anyway? If something works like it's supposed to, I don't care what it looks like!

Dot Matrix said,

Just what are you on? What else do you need?
Enjoy your clutter then. Browser UIs don't have any right being busy by default, as with any UI in general.

No if you are a power user.

Brony said,

No if you are a power user.

What does being a power user have to do with cluttering up the screen with controls? Browsers are about content, not buttons or menus.

Dot Matrix said,

What does being a power user have to do with cluttering up the screen with controls? Browsers are about content, not buttons or menus.

A power user requires the access to different tools directly.

Anyways, about the upper interface:
iexplorer 10 uses 60px while Firefox 25 uses 72px but Firefox 25 uses the space more efficiently for tabs.

Brony said,
A power user requires the access to different tools directly.
That's why a true power user like me actually removes stuff from the UI and relies on shortcuts 24/7. It gives you more screen real estate to actually browse the web.

All I have for my UI is the menu button, bookmarks button, tab bar, back/forward button, URL bar, and downloads button. If you don't understand how I can live with that, ask me how I do anything and I'll probably describe an equivalent or quicker way to do it than you.

Dot Matrix said,

Just what are you on? What else do you need? Enjoy your clutter then.
Browser UIs don't have any right being busy by default, as with any UI in general.


What an absolute load of drivel. You must have hated browsers before Chrome came along
and started the trend of dumbing things down. My browser isn't cluttered ... to me at least.
Pretty much everything I have on the UI in my installation of SeaMonkey has its uses. I'd be
lost without most of the stuff in the menus, although I admit there are a small number of
items in some of the menus that don't really need to be there.

At the very least, most of the items under the File, Edit, View, Tools and Window menus are
useful to me. My SeaMonkey menu bar is also home to my mostly used extensions, much
like the Add-ons bar that replaced the Status bar in Firefox a while back

I am the type of power user that enjoys customisability and flexibility. I like to have all my
most used features and tools within easy reach, regardless of the program I'm using.

Desktop browser UI's don't have any right to be dumbed down to such a point that they
look like they've been designed for use only on a mobile device. The argument about
streamlined GUI's being so necessary because they free up screen real estate is crap
when we can have large displays set at high resolutions. Saving those few extra lines
is pointless, unless you have an ancient 15inch CRT monitor stuck at 800x600!

So you go ahead and continue enjoy your useless dumbed down GUI's and I'll continue
to enjoy the flexibility of my ultra-customisable cluttered GUI, and we'll leave it at that.


(Lest we foget ... NeoPlanet! Now THAT was one massively over cluttered browser GUI!)

DJGM said,

Pretty much everything I have on the UI in my installation of SeaMonkey has its uses. I'd be
lost without most of the stuff in the menus, although I admit there are a small number of
items in some of the menus that don't really need to be there.

Have fun using your mouse; I'll be using the keyboard! No need to drag the mouse, position your mouse over the correct button, click, and repeat as you go through menus. I think pressing two or three buttons to do any task is faster. Especially if my hands stay on the keyboard the whole time; then if I want to do a search in a new tab, I don't have to click to open a new tab, click the search bar, type, and hit enter. No, I just press CTRL+T, type, and hit enter. And I don't use bookmarks either; I just press CTRL+T, type what I want, and use the arrow keys to select what I want.

What's the point of having extra UI controls if they don't offer any extra usefulness and are only more cumbersome to use than using shortcuts?

Pluto is a Planet said,

Have fun using your mouse; I'll be using the keyboard! No need to drag the mouse, position
your mouse over the correct button, click, and repeat as you go through menus.


I actually find it quicker and easier to use the mouse, than having to memorise keyboard shortcuts,
especially when a small number of options in the menus actually have keyboard shortcuts. I find a
mouse is more than quick enough to navigate any of the menus and get to exactly what I want.

When it comes to the keyboard, I use it for what it was designed for in the first place ... typing!

Pluto is a Planet said,

What's the point of having extra UI controls if they don't offer any extra
usefulness and are only more cumbersome to use than using shortcuts?


True ... if they didn't offer me any extra usefulness, I wouldn't bother with them, but they actually
do offer me extra usefulness. To me, it's the keyboard shortcuts that are cumbersome.

Think of browser GUI as the program's toolbox. With browsers like SeaMonkey, there's a good
selection of tools ready for use, but with slimline (dumbed down) browsers, it's like having a
toolbox with more than half your tools missing! Like a carpenter or a joiner going to work
for the day with only a small hammer, four small nails, and a screwdriver.

Of course, there is the fact that SeaMonkey isn't just a web browser, it's an application suite.

DJGM said,

Think of browser GUI as the program's toolbox. With browsers like SeaMonkey, there's a good
selection of tools ready for use, but with slimline (dumbed down) browsers, it's like having a
toolbox with more than half your tools missing! Like a carpenter or a joiner going to work
for the day with only a small hammer, four small nails, and a screwdriver.

The majority of users don't need carpenter tools, though, and shouldn't be forced to have them. GUIs are developed for the LCD (Not that I'm calling users dumb, and for the majority of users, K.I.S.S. is key. The place I work at upgraded to IE10 last month, and feedback has been quite positive, compared to IE8. THe majority of the comments are saying they're enjoying having more screen space that IE10 offers by default.

Dot Matrix said,

The place I work at upgraded to IE10 last month, and feedback has been quite positive, compared to IE8. THe majority of the comments are saying they're enjoying having more screen space that IE10 offers by default.

Not surprised. IE 7 and 8 were slow. Google took advantage of this, and offered the world a slim faster browser - Chrome. IE has finally caught up to Firefox and Chrome (and yes I know, surpassed them in some areas). But Google and Mozilla won't stop, like Microsoft did with IE 6 back in the XP days. There's still many improvements that need to be made to IE (I still prefer Firefox or Chrome).

i wish there 'stop button' to stop the execution of running javascripts,
I found that most javascripts are designed that its execution can't be stopped with "Esc" key anymore.

Thats annoying those scripts are usually made to to fetch new ads every few seconds intervals.

May give it a shot once it posts, but for me the Linux version has always been really slow compared to the Linux version of Chrome.

acido00 said,
Hope they fix the Flash bug on Mavericks!!!
Flash needs to be replaced/needs a complete rewrite. I can't express how much faster a Flash blocker makes web browsing - no browser lockup.

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