MPA & RIAA continue Wrath into 2008

Only 10 days into the New Year and the two groups are at it again. On behalf of the major record companies, the Recording Industry Association of America has sent yet another (the twelfth) wave of 407 pre-litigation settlement letters to 18 universities nationwide. Each pre-litigation settlement letter informs the school of a forthcoming copyright infringement suit against one of its students or personnel and requests that university administrators forward the letter to allow the individuals the opportunity to promptly resolve the matter and avoid a lawsuit. Meanwhile, as part of the Motion Picture Association’s anti-piracy initiative Operation Blackout, which runs through the holiday season till the end of January 2008, a team of 22 officers from ECOTEC and MPA representatives raided two distribution centers and 11 retail outlets located in the notorious Banmor area in Bangkok. During the raid, over 25,000 optical discs were seized and five individuals were arrested.

Of the former, 6,000 were infringed MPA member company titles including “Alien vs. Predator 2”, “American Gangster” and “I am Legend”. “The police have no day off when it comes to pirates selling their products. We will continue to do everything within our powers to stop these criminals,” said General Visuth, who led the officers, after the raid.

As usual, the RIAA is backing up its methods with statistics:

  • a survey by Student Monitor from 2006: more than half of college students download music and movies illegally
  • Market research firm NPD: college students alone accounted for more than 1.3 billion illegal music downloads in 2006
  • Institute for Policy Innovation: global theft of sound recordings cost the U.S. economy $12.5 billion in lost revenue and more than 71,000 jobs and $2 billion in wages to U.S. workers per year

Bringing lawsuits has never been our first choice. But for those who continually ignore enticing legal alternatives and plentiful warnings, it’s a necessary part of the equation,” said Jonathan Lamy, Senior Vice President, Communications, RIAA.

The MPA also cites losses – MPA studios have reportedly lost US$6.1 billion to worldwide piracy in 2005. About US$2.4 billion was lost to bootlegging, US$1.4 billion to illegal copying and US$2.3 billion to Internet piracy. Of the US$6.1 billion in lost revenue to the studios, approximate $1.2 billion came from piracy across the Asia-Pacific region, while piracy in the U.S. accounted for $1.3 billion.

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Cancer Group asks Women to be Brazen Online

Next Story

RealWorld Photos 2007.1 Beta

41 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

"But for those who continually ignore enticing legal alternatives" - so a CD with 1/2 a good song (sorry I used a calculator from the RIAA) for $14.99 is an "enticing legal alternative".

That is total BS. I agree with going after the folks who are profiting from the illegal sales but they need to get their sorry act in gear or in a couple of years Apple will own the whole thing. The last time I bought a CD was 3-4 years ago. I haven't used Kazaa or Napster since its inception. Apple iTunes gift cards are it for me.....

<object width="425" height="355"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/YpCASVFyQoE&rel=1"></param><param name="wmode" value="transparent"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/YpCASVFyQoE&rel=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" wmode="transparent" width="425" height="355"></embed></object>

If you think about it, it's almost within their best interest to keep making crappy products.

That way, they can keep posting losses in sales and continue to sue people and settle for many times over what they'd normally get.

$12.5 billion and 71000 jobs my ass.

I see that they're sending out their extortion letters again..... What, suing dead 12 year old girls who don't even have a computer next?

MPA studios have reportedly lost US$6.1 billion to worldwide piracy in 2005. About US$2.4 billion was lost to bootlegging, US$1.4 billion to illegal copying and US$2.3 billion to Internet piracy.

What utter b***s***!!!

$2.3Billion in internet piracy. So ok...good films gross what?.....few hundred mil at Box Office? and less than that from DVD sales. So they are saying that 7 (give or take) times as many people downloaded the film(s) than went to see it at the Flicks of on DVD.

Get the f*** outta here!! I know b***s*** stats when I see them!

It's a shame that P2P sharing is lumped together with real piracy. I'm all for arresting people who replicate and sell pirated CDs etc but it's nothing like Joe Average downloading a few albums off the 'net like RIAA would like people to believe.

LaXu said,
It's a shame that P2P sharing is lumped together with real piracy. I'm all for arresting people who replicate and sell pirated CDs etc but it's nothing like Joe Average downloading a few albums off the 'net like RIAA would like people to believe.

Downloading music for free is like stealing satellite which is like stealing an old lady's handbag...

A crime is a crime as the commercials would like us to believe...

Turge said,
Downloading music for free is like stealing satellite which is like stealing an old lady's handbag...

A crime is a crime as the commercials would like us to believe...

Such an analogy is antithetical, anyone with reasoning skills would understand that.

Quote of ANova .... "These people and their claims are full of so much bull**** it's not even funny anymore. The figures of "lost" revenue are all pie in the sky assumptions that everyone and their grandmothers would go buy every single album or track that the RIAA's constituants release if it were not for peer sharing. They know this would not be the case but they do so anyways to get the sympathy vote."

exactly my point! ... cause it's pretty much a fact (or at least common sense) that not all the people who could not download it for free would not ALL buy the stuff if they could not get it for free... sure "some" would but not all.... this reason alone makes there figures highly exaggerated! ... so regardless if your for piracy or against it.. this claim i just said is very hard to ignore!!! as common sense tells you this ;)

cause i would be willing to bet that majority that could not get it for free would not buy it if that was the only way they could obtain it.... so in other words i would "guess" a ball park figure of there "real" loses are about half ish of what they claim they are TOPS.

and about there job losses... i would be willing to bet that those are exaggerated to... cause of those stats are made from companys like RIAA or MPAA etc you cant trust them as they will make everything look as bad as possible to make themselves look as good as possible for suing people.... cause i wish a independent company would go around to see the "real" loses of jobs out there. ill bet it aint nearly as bas as they claim since the fact of there money loses are exaggerated for sure.

Quote ... "$2 billion in wages to U.S. workers per year" ... this is BS, if it's even close to true it's probably for the "higher up's" which are already sick rich anyways so it aint like it's hurting them as they probably living the good life as it is.

Institute for Policy Innovation: global theft of sound recordings cost the U.S. economy $12.5 billion in lost revenue and more than 71,000 jobs and $2 billion in wages to U.S. workers per year

Assuming that if there was no way to download the stuff, they would automatically buy that album and/or movie.

I really doubt that 71,000 jobs were lost because of piracy. I mean, we all know they lose money off of it (you can't deny that), but it's not NEARLY what these people think. I mean hey, it gives jobs to people in the RIAA and MPA.

During the raid, over 25,000 optical discs were seized and five individuals were arrested.

5 people for 25,000 discs!? Wow!! That's like, 5,000 per person :P

Tha Bloo Monkee said,

5 people for 25,000 discs!? Wow!! That's like, 5,000 per person :P

that's litterally nothing. not even the smallest of small scratches to the pirating buisness


such a giant waste of time

Oh, I know there's plenty more where that came from. I don't know why it's a waste of time tho, so what? Should they just sit back and let everyone get away with it?

(PS: I bet someone will say "Yes." )

It's interesting how $12.5 billion appears from nowhere. The reality is that money not spent on CDs is spent on clothes, alcohol or any other number of products / activities. It's not a loss to the economy, it is merely a redistribution. Still, the truth isn't going to stop these organisations making up figures and destroying the lives of thousands of people.

However, busting people for profiting from piracy is a worthwhile activity and something I totally support.

Tha Bloo Monkee said,

Assuming that if there was no way to download the stuff, they would automatically buy that album and/or movie.

I really doubt that 71,000 jobs were lost because of piracy. I mean, we all know they lose money off of it (you can't deny that), but it's not NEARLY what these people think. I mean hey, it gives jobs to people in the RIAA and MPA.

These people and their claims are full of so much bull**** it's not even funny anymore. The figures of "lost" revenue are all pie in the sky assumptions that everyone and their grandmothers would go buy every single album or track that the RIAA's constituants release if it were not for peer sharing. They know this would not be the case but they do so anyways to get the sympathy vote.

As far as jobs lost, I wouldn't shed one tear (except in laughter) if all the RIAA employees lost their jobs and were homeless on the streets.

Tha Bloo Monkee said,
Institute for Policy Innovation: global theft of sound recordings cost the U.S. economy $12.5 billion in lost revenue and more than 71,000 jobs and $2 billion in wages to U.S. workers per year

Hmm... 12.5 billion dollars.

I wonder what the demand for extra storage, computer gear, and bandwidth created by music bootlegging equates to in dollars.

Hak Foo said,

Hmm... 12.5 billion dollars.

I wonder what the demand for extra storage, computer gear, and bandwidth created by music bootlegging equates to in dollars.

A point similar to one I've been making to various people for a while now. Same in the UK. People are going "WOW, our internet speed has really sped up over the last 12months". Yup...but why...it's not because people want to use video conferencing in every household is it? Or that people want to be able to read there mail 2ms faster. Nope...it's good old streaming media and piracy (streaming media must include a proportion of copywright material too...look at YouTube)

“The police have no day off when it comes to pirates selling their products. We will continue to do everything within our powers to stop these criminals,” said General Visuth, who led the officers, after the raid.

Thank goodness, now the world is a safer place without these dangerous criminals selling movies.

Tha Bloo Monkee said,
I see nothing wrong with busting people who make money off of selling pirated stuff.

All else equal, I'd rather they sell pirated movies/software/handbags. It's a purely economic crime-- one person's wealth is denied in favour of another.

If bootlegging becomes a compelling enough source of revenue, it can displace far more socially hazardous crimes (the street-drug business, the protection racket)

Tha Bloo Monkee said,
I see nothing wrong with busting people who make money off of selling pirated stuff.

that is really who the REAL pirates are. Thats how it was for years before downloading. There's no grey area here. However I always read it was the pirates who would be in trouble not the person buying the bootleg/counterfeit. As in those days, the RIAA considered that customer the victim. Not anymore.

I always found the so called losses bull****, who ever says that a person who pirate something will actually buy it whether he pirated it or not.

Yinchie said,
I always found the so called losses bull****, who ever says that a person who pirate something will actually buy it whether he pirated it or not.

EXACTLY...!!!...

Never would have rediscovered Depeche Mode if I hadn't downloaded it first. Since when has the RIAA had rental stores? So one can rent an album for $2 for a week. Cd's tend to be more expensive than movies. RIght now they are about as expensive as a Blu Ray or HDDVD disc.

and exactly where are the 71,000 jobs. Some of these cd's aren't made in America. As I've said I don't listen to that much music anymore. I certainly don't discover music on a radio. And MTV/VH1 sucks. So where do they think I'll discover new music? Can't view it at a theater.... Yeah. makes lots of sense to me. o_O
(btw I own the real cd for Depeche Mode Playing the Angel and play it quite often.)