MSI Brings Turbo Button to GeForce 8600GT

MSI has announced its new NX8600GT Twin Turbo, which uniquely features dual video BIOSes, each containing different core and memory clock settings. Users can switch between the two clock speed profiles with the press of a turbo button placed on the metal expansion bracket above the DVI ports. With the stock speed profile, the NX8600GT Twin Turbo operates at 540 MHz core, 1400 MHz memory and the shader clock operates at 1450 MHz. A press of the turbo button raises the clock speeds up to 580 MHz core, 1600 MHz memory and the shader clock receives a boost to 1508 MHz. MSI claims a 20% performance boost in 3DMark06 with a press of the turbo button. Other notable features of the NX8600GT Twin Turbo with 256MB of GDDR3 memory include dual dual-link DVI, HDCP compliance, HDMI output capable and component video output.

News source: DailyTech

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Seagate: No Buyout Offer from Chinese Company

Next Story

Microsoft Ceases AutoPatcher Project

24 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

this is purely aesthetic. Look at alienware, their machines look wicked but my little athlon firebird runs better than most of their rigs, and im running a TNT2 gfx card and ubuntu. Come On!

and i agree with #13 (8-n-1) Turbos and rocket fins and flames make things faster to the public eye.

Thats just stupid. Even if its put there to save "power" its something no one will do. It would become a hassle to have to go behind your computer just to push the button to speed up the card when you want to play a game.

I don't think its even cool. Just one annoying hassle. Then on top of it, you would have to be checking it to see if you have it on high speed or low all the time.

yes... why yes of course! someone get on photoshop immediately!

Esvandiary said,

Hmm... That could worryingly easily turn into a new meme :laugh:

Haha, indeed! :D

Some may miss the point with those, but it was actually there to not make the computer run faster, but slower. Because some games and things like that were back then often coded in a way that they ran much faster on "too fast" computers. So then you could turn off the "turbo" and get the same performance as a slower computer, and make the game run at the right speed. :)

So that button quickly got out of fashion because it was just a patchwork solution that can't hold up well as computers kept getting faster. Later they instead started synchronizing the game speed instead of having it run as fast as possible to fix this.

So I wonder why MSI is adding this... It's surely not for the same reason... Could it be to make it more "ecologic" and need less power? But on the other hand, it shouldn't consume as much power under little load as under heavy, turbo button or not.

Jugalator said,
Haha, indeed! :D

Some may miss the point with those, but it was actually there to not make the computer run faster, but slower. Because some games and things like that were back then often coded in a way that they ran much faster on "too fast" computers. So then you could turn off the "turbo" and get the same performance as a slower computer, and make the game run at the right speed. :)


Hell, there's a more modern version called Intel SpeedStep :laugh:

I'm not kidding, try loading Unreal Tournament with SpeedStep active... It runs at twice the normal speed

There is NO GOOD reason for this except its COOL!!!. We all forgot & missed that great turbo button, what differentiates one rebranded vid card from another?

Makes me want to dig up my old 386 box, put a brand new system with this card in it, and wire up the ol' button to keep on doing what it does best. Too bad the LCD up top only supports two digits for the MHz display. :cheeky:

The more things change...

My guess would be to save on power consumption

everyone's going green?

I agree though that a running applet could've also worked, but this is probably easier for MSI to execute

I'm puzzled too.

If it's faster, run it at the higher speed all the time, or better yet, use a clever little applet that can tell if you've loaded a game and therefore should be at the high speed, and then clock back down for the desktop so it runs quiet and cool.

Hak Foo said,
I'm puzzled too.

If it's faster, run it at the higher speed all the time, or better yet, use a clever little applet that can tell if you've loaded a game and therefore should be at the high speed, and then clock back down for the desktop so it runs quiet and cool.

I guess the analogy of a car with nitrous could be used only using it where necessary as to extend the life of the engine

You CAN do that - but with RivaTuner for example. The point of this is to give the consumer that much more choice and obviously to differentiate itself from its competitors with the Dual BIOS' and Turbo button. Doesn't seem like you even know what overclocking is!?

P.S. This is to the 2.0 post, not the 2.1 reply.

illz55 said,
Doesn't seem like you even know what overclocking is!?

He gets it but I think his point is that if most people who overclock their video cards leave them overclocked, why include a "turbo button" at all!?

It's the same thing as the old math co-processor on 286 and 386 machines. Everyone left them on once programs were written that weren't clock cycle based (ex. when you hit the turbo button some games would speed up to the point of unplayability because they relied on what clock speed you were running).