Nearly 50% of Windows 7 PCs run 64-bit versions

Microsoft said on Thursday that nearly half of all Windows 7 PCs are running 64-bit versions of the operating system.

Early indications that 64-bit adoption rate was much higher than 32 began earlier this year. Statistics, released in January, from Valve's steam gaming software, showed that 64-bit Windows 7 was popular amongst gamers. Microsoft confirmed on Thursday that as of June, 46% of all PCs worldwide running Windows 7 are running a 64-bit edition of Windows 7. "Compared to Windows Vista at 3 and a half years after launch, only 11% of PCs running Windows Vista worldwide are running 64-bit," said Microsoft blogger Brandon LeBlanc.

Microsoft's success with Windows 7 began before the product was even widely available. Released in October 2009, the operating system has received praise from consumers, businesses and the media. In November 2009, Windows 7 managed to surpass Apple's Snow Leopard market share in just two weeks. In early February it was revealed that Windows 7 had reached 10% market share in just three months. To further cement its success, Microsoft announced that Windows 7 is the fastest selling operating system in history, selling over 150 million licenses to date. The company is projected to sell 300 million by the end of 2010, a goal that Microsoft could easily achieve.

Windows 7 has also driven an uptake of 64-bit computing. According to ChangeBASE research, conducted with senior IT decision makers, more than 65% of businesses hoped to migrated to Windows 7 within 12 months of its release. Over 50% of those migrating will be choosing the 64-bit route.

Screenshots of a Windows 7 post RTM build showed up on the web in February, fueling speculation that Microsoft is compiling early Windows 8 builds. The successor to Windows 7 will likely be available in 2011 as an ex-Microsoft worker penned July 2011 as the RTM date for Windows 8.

Microsoft is currently readying its first Service Pack for Windows 7. Technical beta testers recently received build 7601.16562.100603-1800. A public beta version will be available in July with a final release expected in September this year.

Thanks to Neowin member Mephistopheles for the news tip

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grrrrrrrr said,
MS gave out 32bit at their win7 event...this is the only reason why i use 32bit now.. =D

I got vista x32 retail in 2006, but the serial number worked with the x64 version that i got from the net too. Maybe windows 7 does the same.

Windows 8 should only be 64 Bits. If your PC is too old, then stay with Win7 32bits until you upgrade.

I see low-end PC selling with 4, 6 and even 8Gb of RAM, and all CPU are 64Bits, including the lowly ATOM.

TruckWEB said,
Windows 8 should only be 64 Bits. If your PC is too old, then stay with Win7 32bits until you upgrade.

I see low-end PC selling with 4, 6 and even 8Gb of RAM, and all CPU are 64Bits, including the lowly ATOM.

QFT

I think the growing usage of 64 bit computing is more of a sign that systems are on a 4GB ram time frame , and probably who did not upgrade to windows 7 x64 flavor, has an older PC where it would be useless, keep in mind that not all windows 7 machines support x64 , i used windows 7 on a Pentium 4 not long ago, with decent performance.

NEWS FLASH! THIS JUST IN...
In other news, the sky is blue & the grass is green! Film @ 11.
Duh! More computers new are 64 bit, so it would make sense that they would have a 64 bit OS.

Abdul RaFy Siddiqui said,
so windows 8 will be completely on 64 bit & 128 bit huh....

except it is too soon for 128bit yet

Ci7 said,
except it is too soon for 128bit yet

I second that, it won't be years until 128bit CPU's will be needed - by that time we'll be using something that has a completely different way of functioning.

Its not the drivers, its the SW. Yes, one can get most to run on 64 bit (or virtual xp), but I guess many would be more convinced if full 64 support were offered. For example, photoshop. It installs both 64 bit and 32 bit. If you want to run some of the related plug-ins, you have to run 32 bit. Others work on 64 bit...so you have to juggle between the 2 versions of photoshop depending on what tools you want to use. You have 64 bit browsers, but these are then not supported by some of the internet security SW, so you have to run 32 bit. All a bit confusing, inconvenient, inconsistent, and quite honestly wasteful from a space perspective. And I guess it kind of defeats the purpose of running a 64 bit OS.

Perhaps this adoption rate will help convince SW companies to fully convert to 64 bit, which in turn may convince the other ones to convert as well.

I try 64 bit periodically to see whether these issues have been resolved. Unfortunately, I am still part of the 54% crowd.

I think I saw some where that Windows 7 is actually the last 32bit OS from MS. Starting with Windows 8 it will be nothing but 64bit ..

Once reliable CPUs made their way into the hands of Joe Six-Pack, it was in the interests of software makers to pony up. While my last desktop was 64xable, the CPU was 2nd gen Intel. I went 32. In the next few years, everything will become 64. Running Win 7 64 now and loving it.
Allows me to use all of my hardware resources. While there is still so sware that is 32, going 64 makes sense. Why buy a Porshe if there is an artificial limit on how fast you can drive?

Interesting figures; although, what about the 60% of software installed on Win7_64-Bit which is installed as 32-Bit only...?

"Cough"

I am taking my 64 bit os out and going back to 32 bit. There are way too many compatibility issues going on with it...

Let us just say that 32 bit is older than Methuslah now. 64 bit is now the only way to go. I have 64 bit Office Home & Business also. Only way to go. Yes my software is legal. 32 bit has been around way to long now. Maybe Windows 8 will only be 64 bit with option for 128 bit if possible.

cybertech77 said,
Let us just say that 32 bit is older than Methuslah now. 64 bit is now the only way to go. I have 64 bit Office Home & Business also. Only way to go. Yes my software is legal. 32 bit has been around way to long now. Maybe Windows 8 will only be 64 bit with option for 128 bit if possible.

64bit is not the "only" way to go. use what version you need, thats the "only" way some people can.

That's good news.

It's been a few years since the 64 bit tech kicked in and the industry should move faster in advancing the 64 bit adoption.

Related to this 64 bit thing, I remember a Linux geek telling me that Windows is not true 64 bit OS.He said something along the lines of "bulk of Windows API code base is still 32 bit oriented, while Linux is truly 64 bit OS".

Can anybody confirm this?

Username.ToString(); said,
That's good news.

It's been a few years since the 64 bit tech kicked in and the industry should move faster in advancing the 64 bit adoption.

Related to this 64 bit thing, I remember a Linux geek telling me that Windows is not true 64 bit OS.He said something along the lines of "bulk of Windows API code base is still 32 bit oriented, while Linux is truly 64 bit OS".

Can anybody confirm this?

Anybody with a 64 bit processor and time can make open source software 64 bit. I think I might have one 32 bit program installed on my computer. The rest of it is compiled for 64 bit out of the box since anybody can do it instead of having to wait in the original software author to do so. As far as the Windows API though, I can't say.

Believe it or not, not everyone should have 64-bit Windows. Those with less than 4 GB of RAM should stay with 32 bits. 64-bit Windows uses more RAM and disk space since all memory addresses have to be 8 bytes instead of 4.

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