Need a 4G plan with more data? Get a million-gigabyte bundle for £8m

As mobile devices become ever more capable, data usage continues to grow at an incredible rate. Staying connected on the move is about far more than just sending texts and receiving calls, of course – there are much greater requirements to be satisfied, from playing Words With Friends to uploading photos of food and kittens to Instagram.

As 4G networks connect us with the rest of the world at ever-greater speeds, our data consumption looks set to explode even further. But consumers aren’t the only ones looking to get the most out of these technological advancements; businesses too are reaping the benefits of faster mobile networks.

EE, the U.K.’s largest 4G network, predicts that businesses will consume 860% more mobile data by 2016 compared with today. But feedback from its business customers has revealed that many are struggling to anticipate exactly how their data consumption needs will change in the medium-term and beyond.

This is a problem that EE is keen to resolve with the launch of its new Super Bundles. Business and enterprise customers can now purchase these huge and highly flexible data packages, ranging from 50 terabytes (TB) up to a massive one petabyte (PB) – that’s one million gigabytes. EE says that 1PB is roughly equivalent to a billion 40-slide PowerPoint presentations or thirteen years of continuous HD video streaming.

There are many potential advantages for businesses buying a Super Bundle. They come with no fixed contract period and no expiry date, and there is no charge for adding or removing new users to share in the pool of data, bringing exactly the kind of functionality and flexibility that many businesses demand. Companies can even choose to pay in full upfront, or to spread their payments over time.

So, just how much does a 1PB data bundle cost? A cool £8m GBP ($12.86m USD), which – at that pricing tier – works out at £8 ($12.86) per gigabyte. EE points out that this could offer huge savings for data-intensive industries, such as broadcast.

Outdoor broadcasts typically rely on satellite uplinks to relay video streams to transmission centres, and EE claims that this kind of arrangement typically costs around £20 ($32) per gigabyte. Satellite connections must also be pre-booked, and only remain open for a limited period of time. EE’s setup offer far greater flexibility, with lower costs and no requirement to book a connection in advance. The company says that it offers average upload speeds of 24-30Mbps, but as we reported recently, it is also trialling 300Mbps connections.

Sadly, EE’s Super Bundles are only available for business customers, so if you were hoping to add a few hundred terabytes of data to your personal price plan, you’re out of luck. 

Source: EE

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19 Comments

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I used 73GB of Data last month on Three. I pay a flat £37 per month for unlimited data & texts plus 2000 mins of calls. Can Tether too. That has to be a better deal for companies.

Having said that, I just did a speed test on my phone's 3G (Dual HSPDA) network and I'm getting 16MBS. Fast enough to stream HD on youtube.

HardyRexion said,
I used 73GB of Data last month on Three. I pay a flat £37 per month for unlimited data & texts plus 2000 mins of calls. Can Tether too. That has to be a better deal for companies.

Not a bad deal that... I pay more and get less. However, the reason I went for the contract I'm on is because I only wanted a 12 month one. I take it yours is 24 months?

Javik said,
Looking at the market that's not such an awful deal

Yes it is, it's a horrible deal. For example, AT&T (the evilest carrier in the world), only charges $10/GB of overage. EE is charging $12.86/GB and that's for a BULK deal, which AT&T doesn't even offer.

Sadly in the UK Mobile Data has always been horrendously expensive. This is because all the UK providers are worried about becoming dumb pipes for VOIP and Messaging Replacements. Their trying to carry their failing profits by overselling what's essentially fast becoming nationwide WiFi,

Mobile data is several dozen times more expensive than fixed lines for what is essentially an inferior product and uptake is still low http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-23549609
Customers are starting to catch on that "speed" is largely irrelevant now for basic usage and not needed 95% of the time on a handset. The trouble is tethering costs are insanely high data plans specifically for it are even more overpriced.

No doubt they will soon start throttling 3G speeds soon to make them seem prehistoric in an attempt to push more people onto 4G. Once this happens the super speeds their touting will slowly diminish.

Vodaphone are trying to flog our company 4g at the moment and have already told us that 4G contracts will enjoy "better" speeds on 3G no doubt at the expense of traffic prioritizing above 3G customers.

Rosyna said,

Yes it is, it's a horrible deal. For example, AT&T (the evilest carrier in the world), only charges $10/GB of overage. EE is charging $12.86/GB and that's for a BULK deal, which AT&T doesn't even offer.

I'd wager AT&T would be a bit more likely to get narky however if you used a PB of data

Id imagine if you offered them $12million they would let you use as much data as you like

1PB is basically saying unlimited data while protecting the telco from company's with hundreds of handsets basically going to town 24/7.

If this was aimed at the consumer market it would say

TOTALLY UNLIMTED DATA USAGE !!!!!!1111 *

* Subject to fair usage policy. After 1PB we will reduce the connection to 128kbps.

Love deals like this....except when a year later they go under, sell out or otherwise find a way to weasel out of giving you what you paid for.

Exactly... when it comes to data plans, never buy more than you can use before a company can deliver it all before going belly up. How many businesses will have work forces that will need to download/stream so much data.

Hmm... Unless we are talking about a world with high quality HD/UHD streams. There's video conferencing, security systems with cameras and other sensors, and accessing virtual machines remotely at the display resolution and color depth back to an employee's BYODs. ::shrug::