Net Applications: Chrome now ahead of Firefox in web browser market share

Users of Google's Chrome web browser finally got ahead of Mozilla's Firefox in Net Applications' latest stat numbers. The firm, which uses data from unique visitors to 40,000 websites, showed that last month, Chrome had 17.52 percent of the worldwide browser market share, putting it in second place ahead of Firefox's 17.26 percent for the first time in Net Applications' history.

The latest numbers still show Microsoft's Internet Explorer family still on top with 57.96 percent, although that is actually down from the 59.19 percent it claimed in February. IE still has a higher percentage than it had a year ago when it claimed 55 percent of the market. IE8 remains the single most used web browser version in the world at 21.14 percent, followed by the latest version, IE11, at 15.71 percent in March. Chrome 33 is third with 12.67 percent and Firefox 27 is fourth with 10.55 percent.

Firefox may get a big boost in users very soon. Mozilla is expected to release a major user interface revamp of its browser in a few weeks with the launch of Firefox 29. That version is supposed to contain the "Australis" UI that is currently available in Mozilla's beta testing channel.

Source: Net Applications | Image via Net Applications

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19 Comments

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Firefox needs to evolve, it's stuck with legacy code and gets noticeably slower than Chrome. Half of the planned Firefox features don't even make it into release builds, such is the case with their inexistent multi-process project announced years ago or even the whole load of features originally planned for FF4 which took maybe over 10 more releases to be actually implemented. Their development is chaotic, disorganized and lacking compared to Chrome. No wonder why they're losing users with such a mindset, not to mention that a new UI won't improve things for users as long as the underlying FF codebase remains bloated.

Haven't a lot if releases been addressing what you talking about as they were giving it lots of small speed improvements.

yowanvista said,
Firefox needs to evolve, it's stuck with legacy code and gets noticeably slower than Chrome. Half of the planned Firefox features don't even make it into release builds, such is the case with their inexistent multi-process project announced years ago or even the whole load of features originally planned for FF4 which took maybe over 10 more releases to be actually implemented. Their development is chaotic, disorganized and lacking compared to Chrome. No wonder why they're losing users with such a mindset, not to mention that a new UI won't improve things for users as long as the underlying FF codebase remains bloated.

Firefox has not been doing good lately and that is due to mozilla lost their focus. instead of developing browser and expanding it to different devices they put browser development on hold in favor of firefox OS that no one gives a ####.

Given how out of whack their new focus is I suppose this sort of news was expected and perhaps doesn't even affect them as it might have done some time back. I like the latest IE versions but don't want to see Chrome as the only competition left.

Yer probably because so many software installs have it as an 'optional' extra.
Most people won't/don't bother to check all the extra crap that comes with various installers.

Does MS' new approach of making software everyone wants to use on any platform extend to IE11 on android and ios? =)

"Firefox may get a big boost in users very soon"

Or it may see a dip due to a lot of people choosing to stop using FireFox due to their new CEO's hateful bigoted history, opinions, and donations.

or attracting the opposite crowd...which outnumbers them by quite a bit. Chick Filet was a great example of that, profits soared after Christians showed up to support them. This was just another stupid over-reaction from the politically correct/gay crowd. Look into it, it's nothing. Firefox is a great browser to me, nothing else offers the extensions I now depend on. Chrome and Google in general are building some pretty serious negativity lately and eventually it catches up.

I still prefer how Firefox handles many open tabs at once over Chrome....with as many tabs as I normally run, using Chrome is completely impractical for me.

All Chrome needs is a larger minimum tab size....Firefox can only show about 16-17 tabs along the top (and is scrollable with the scroll wheel), but I can see the favicon and part of the title of the site, with Chrome, they shrink so small you can only see the favicon and therefore cannot make out which tab is the one you want when more than one goes to the same website.

I tried it once before and it is much nicer, but there's no way to scroll through then like Firefox, you have to click on the tiny portion of the stacked tabs or use hotkeys to switch.

With Firefox you can scroll left and right through the tabs and simply click the full sized tab you want to switch to.....it's honestly the only thing keeping me on Firefox....tried tons of Chrome extensions too and none really duplicated this functionality.

I suppose Firefox is simply more tab-junky friendly.

Looks like Firefox is stuck between a rock and a hard place. With the new enterprise mode in IE11 that they just demoed lots of those IE8 installs which are probably for business can now upgrade off of that, so IE11 will just keep growing at this point.

Depends on the company doing the metering. Net Applications extrapolates by population and doing that makes countries like China weigh a lot harder, pushing up IE.

Others just use data directly, meaning they represent the actual amount of users on the sites monitored. Chrome has been topping those for a while. As a web developer those are probably more relevant if you're targeting people in your region anyway.

Ambroos said,
Depends on the company doing the metering. Net Applications extrapolates by population and doing that makes countries like China weigh a lot harder, pushing up IE.

Others just use data directly, meaning they represent the actual amount of users on the sites monitored. Chrome has been topping those for a while. As a web developer those are probably more relevant if you're targeting people in your region anyway.

Correction: the actual amout of views, not users.

statcounter also counts browsers with pre-cache like chrome as actual visits, even if you don't go to the page. making chrome seem bigger than it is.

the only number that matters: actual users is something google/msft/and Mozilla know. neither will reveal it because they fear it.