Net Applications: IE10 browser share up to 9.26 percent

Internet Explorer 10, Microsoft's latest addition to its web browser family, is making slow but steady progress among PC users. New data from Net Applications shows that in May, IE10 was used by 9.26 of all PC browser users, up from 6.02 percent in April. IE10 is only available for Windows 7 and Windows 8 users.

Net Applications's new numbers show that IE8 is still the most used web browser worldwide with 22.99 percent of the market share in May, down from 23.08 percent in April. IE9 was second with 15.39 percent in May, a big drop compared to 18.17 percent in April.

n terms of overall web browsers, regardless of their version number, the data from Net Applications claims that the Internet Explorer family controlled 55.99 percent of the market share in May, up from 55.81 percent in April. Mozilla's Firefox was number two in May with 20.63, up from  20.30 percent in April. Google's Chrome is third with 15.74 percent in May, down from 16.35 in April.

This week, Microsoft confirmed that it will release Internet Explorer 11 as part of the free Windows 8.1 OS upgrade later this year. While this new version of IE will be launched in a faster fashion compared to previous releases, Microsoft still has not adopted the quick update timeline that Chrome and Firefox now employ, where new versions are released weeks apart and the public can download early beta builds.

Source: Net Applications | Image via Net Applications

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13 Comments

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That's easy for you to say but at work, I'm stuck on IE8 because my OS is Windows XP. I bet that the vast majority of the 22.99% IE8 browsers are running on XP. Microsoft, in their effort to try and move people onto newer OS versions, has chosen not to support XP users with anything past IE8. This strategy has always been a bad move in my opinion.

Funny that if you compare the numbers of several counters (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Usage_share_of_web_browsers) they all more or less agree on the numbers for Firefox, Safari and Opera, but Net Applications is the only one that not only switches the numbers for IE and Chrome but is the only one that has numbers over 50%. That immediately makes me suspicious about their methodologies, and indeed there seems to be some controversy about their weighing of numbers.

quintesse said,
Funny that if you compare the numbers of several counters (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Usage_share_of_web_browsers) they all more or less agree on the numbers for Firefox, Safari and Opera, but Net Applications is the only one that not only switches the numbers for IE and Chrome but is the only one that has numbers over 50%. That immediately makes me suspicious about their methodologies, and indeed there seems to be some controversy about their weighing of numbers.
Fact is that Net Applications does count marketshare, and not which browser has the most pageviews (wich gives a wrong image with technologies as infinite scroll under Chrome and Firefox: every time you scroll is 1 page). Also, in StatCounter, China will affect the statistics on the same level as Belgium, but in China there are over a billion people, while in Belgium only 11 million. Net Applications does count 11 million as 11 million, and a billion as a billion. That's the reason that Net Applications gives other numbers: they do count marketshare, and not something else.

Crimson Rain said,
It says two things:
- chrome's pre-fetch
- and/or chrome users browse lot more pages than others.

Agreed, Net Applications filters out pre-fetch and is careful to uniquely count users. People argue with their weighing and data filtering but everything I've read about their methodology makes sense.

I use IE10 for general purpose and complex sites since Trident is wicked fast at rendering DOMs.
Firefox's Gecko has really fallen behind at things like CSS animations.

cetla said,
I use IE10 for general purpose and complex sites since Trident is wicked fast at rendering DOMs.
...

Why wicked?

Choto Cheeta said,
Funny... In my website, IE shares are not even close to what Chrome and FireFox has..

your website is probably targeted at a specific audience, which is more prone to be using an alternate browser other than the default, or not even using Windows.

I hope Microsoft will never start using this fast development cycle. However, I don't call 3% more a 'slow' progress. That's a big difference compared to what IE9 did.

Studio384 said,
I hope Microsoft will never start using this fast development cycle. However, I don't call 3% more a 'slow' progress. That's a big difference compared to what IE9 did.

Fast for IE looks to be once a year now. IE11 isn't coming till Win8.1 does and that's probably in the fall, Oct-Nov.