Net Applications: Windows 8 keeps gaining market share

For the month of December, Net Applications said that its data showed that Windows 8 was running on 1.64 percent of all PCs worldwide, two months after its launch. Now, new data taken just over two weeks later shows a big growth in the use of Windows 8.

The new data, taken from the week of January 16, shows Windows 8 running on 2.25 percent on all PCs, with two offshoots (Windows 8 Touch and Windows 8 RT Touch) adding another 0.08 percent to that marketshare. Windows 8 is now closing in on Mac OS 10.8, which currently has a 2.43 percent share of the PC OS market.

Windows 7 still has the highest market share with 45.35 percent, followed by the quickly dwindling Windows XP with 38.71 percent. Windows Vista is third with 5.06 percent.

We will likely see a big market share boost for Windows 8 for all of January, thanks in part to the fact that Microsoft will allow its current $39.99 upgrade price for the OS to expire on January 31. After that date, the Windows 8 upgrade for older Windows PCs will be priced at $119.99 and the Windows 8 Pro upgrade will cost $199.99.

Source: Net Applications | Image via Net Applications

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Well, it would be bad for Microsoft if it would come to a halt/decline. I also like how much market share XP has still.

Is Vista already is rapid decline? Can we at least now agree on that it was a disaster?

The real, real life of the OS is half a year by now? A bit less? And in this half a year almost 3%?

There are no many half years out there, at this speed by the time Windows 9 is there, Windows 8 may be installed on 10 to 15% of the computers? Who knows?

"at this speed by the time Windows 9 is there, Windows 8 may be installed on 10 to 15% of the computers? Who knows?"

Which will be 500% of the Mac installed base and a million billion trillion percent of Linux. Spot the Fail.

Didn't know that 2 months and 10 days are the same as 6 months (these numbers are from 1 January 2013). Anyway, whit this, it's much more popular than Mac OS X and Linux, together.

john.smith_2084 said,
The real, real life of the OS is half a year by now? A bit less? And in this half a year almost 3%?

Six months of limited availability only to volume license customers and MSDN subscribers.

It's only had three months of general availability.

At a ridiculously lower price than previous MS OSes.....
Not that I dislike it but if you want to analyze sales you have to consider all the factors.

Rather impressive considering how Windows 8 is a hybrid and a part of the usage can't be registered due to the use of modern apps. So worse case scenario and Windows 8 is 'only' at 2,25%. People said it would fail like Vista and considering how Vista was a financial succes I hope it does 'fail' like Vista.

However Vista's failure was due to it being technically unimpressive with its many driver issues and just being an all-round slowpoke. Windows 8 is technically impressive, everything works flawlessly and it is incredibly fast. Its issue is entirely different than Vista. Its aesthetically different and if it doesnt appeal then it could fail horribly. Not fail like Vista but actually be a failure like Windows Me.

So far it seems this isnt the case, enough people are openminded enough to try it out and give it its innitial marketshare. Word of mouth will do the rest. It's just a matter of time before actual user experiences hold more weight then the senseless hate it received from long before release.

Ronnet said,
It's just a matter of time before actual user experiences hold more weight then the senseless hate it received from long before release.

Uh...most of the criticism surrounding Windows 8 that I've read (or found to be true myself) is exactly about the actual user experience.

CSharp. said,

Uh...most of the criticism surrounding Windows 8 that I've read (or found to be true myself) is exactly about the actual user experience.

Of course not all user experiences can be positive. We all have different needs and tastes so there will be plenty of people who dont like Windows 8. However there are also plenty of people who do like Windows 8. These actual user reviews are now becomming the word of mouth. Instead of the pre-release hatred based on preconceived notions of how a PC is supposed to work.

But it does take some getting used to and you see people being negative innitially and more positive later on. This is clear when reading reviews of apps in the store. Where people innitially dont understand the charms and claim an app is missing search and that W8 is terrible. To later alter their review, say they learned to use the search charms and that W8 is actually great.

you gotta also remember that these numbers are skewed because windows 8 has apps that don't get registered in net applications' stats.

provided they are tracking these sites,using apps like Netflix,hulu,etc... wont register hits,and in turn lets the score be lower than what it really is.

Its gonna get worst when the price hike kicks in, still impressive the gains Windows 8 has made when you take into consideration that Mac OS X 10.8 has been out since July of 2012 and Windows 8 has been generally available since October 2012. A lot more persons would upgrade, but the installation for many has been buggy.

bviktor said,
Uh, rest assured, it's not the price or bugs, it's the lack of a "Windows 8 Loader by Daz".

Nailed it try on the spot.

I like Statcounter's metrics better. They have a much larger sample size and don't weight their samples based on outdated CIA data from 2009.

As of yesterday they had Windows 8 at 2.90%.... including iOS and Android. If you look at just desktop/laptop OSs (Windows, Mac, Linux) it's at 3.09%

Also, be careful about reporting on Net Applications data on Monday.... they tend to adjust their numbers as the week goes on. I've seen the weekly numbers change as late as Wednesday.

Of course it will keep gaining marketshare. Especially in the personal/home computing market when people buy new systems.

With more and more of the newer touch hybrid devices starting to finally come out we'll see it's share keep growing as people look to get new hardware.

What's the likelihood of MS extending the promotional pricing period for Windows 8 as a "surprise" marketing strategy?

Kyang said,
What's the likelihood of MS extending the promotional pricing period for Windows 8 as a "surprise" marketing strategy?

zero

Kalint said,

zero

I wouldn't be too sure about that. They brought back the family pack pricing for Windows 7 in 2010. The $40 upgrade is almost the same thing. We might see it again during the 2013 holidays.

damn. Less then 6 months and Windows 8 will already surpass Linux and Mac OS. I thought gabe said once windows 8 comes out everyone will rage quit and go to Linux / Mac ?

Colin McGregor said,
damn. Less then 6 months and Windows 8 will already surpass Linux and Mac OS. I thought gabe said once windows 8 comes out everyone will rage quit and go to Linux / Mac ?

Probably because once they rage quit to those OSs they're like "Oh wait, I can't do diddly **** on these OS's. Microsoft HERE I COME!!!!".

pantera9 said,
The holy grail of terminals is included with Win8 - PowerShell 3

(and it's awesome in case you wondered)

Whats that for?

Kalint said,

Whats that for?

It is for scripting and happens to be the most powerful scripting shell available on any platform. Version 3.0 is particularly amazing!

ingramator said,

It is for scripting and happens to be the most powerful scripting shell available on any platform. Version 3.0 is particularly amazing!

I see I see, thats probably more for system admins probably?

Kalint said,
I see I see, thats probably more for system admins probably?

For anyone who wants to automate repetitive tasks.
I have three powershell scripts to manage my uTorrent client / long term storage / content renaming.

That's just for personal use.
At work, any repeatable task is put into a powershell function or commandlet. Like, when we get a new employee, we have a script to run on their PC that will set up their development environment for our group's usage. This alone frees up the sysadmins to do better things, while giving our workgroup the control of the system we need. It's a win/win.

One great thing about powershell is it's built upon the .NET framework. This means it's a truly object oriented shell.

When you ask (done using get-* commandlets) what you get returned are Object representations.
When you use get-childItem (aka, Dir || ls) on the filesystem, you get filesystem objects back. When you run the same command in Active Directory, or the registry, you get those object types back. (while this is not 'technically true', it serves an an example)

With some clever knowledge of the underlying Windows subystems, you can transform one to the other with very little issue.

There is a great MS blog called Hey scripting guy, which used to be VBScript, etc. Now mainly powershell.