Net neutrality supporters file lawsuit against net neutrality rules

When the Federal Communications Commission issued its net neutrality rules in their final form last week, there was an uproar from some groups. Verizon and Metro PCS both have said they will sue. However, they have been beat to it by another group already. The activist group Free Press, one of the main supporters of net neutrality, has filed a lawsuit in court, according to Ars Technica.

Free Press is suing not because the rules are too strong, but because they find them too weak. The group says that it is not fair for wireless companies to be exempted from most of the anti-discrimination policies the FCC has set up. Wireless operators cannot ban Internet sites outright, or ban apps that compete with their own services. According to Free Press, they can just do about anything else. Wired operators cannot do those things, however.

Free Press Policy Director Matt Wood stated the following:

Our challenge will show that there is no evidence in the record to justify this arbitrary distinction between wired and wireless Internet access. The disparity that the FCC's rules create is unjust and unjustified. And it's especially problematic because of the increasing popularity of wireless, along with its increasing importance for younger demographics and diverse populations who rely on mobile devices as their primary means for getting online.

The FCC should have an interesting set of battles up ahead as they fight people on both sides of the issue. It should bring to mind the phrase, "You can't keep everybody happy all the time."

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Zune expands to Canada, drops Zune Pass price in US

Next Story

New HP CEO will work for $1 a year

8 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

This is nothing more than extension of AT&T's acquisition of T-Mobile. It has already been paid for.

At times I wonder why all this bashing goes on about Socialism!. We have socialistic democracy, free press, freedom of speech, free enterprise but with only one caveat. No industry is allowed to take their clients for a ride or hijack their rights or freedoms. The government does retain control in areas where it is critical to the national security, economy and welfare of the populace.

We DO have government / city run hospitals which do not turn away any patient whatsoever without charging a penny. Where as people also have a choice of privately operated facilities paid through health insurance. I don't see anything wrong in that.

BTW we have the lowest cost mobile telephony service in the world and all operators make money.

Free Press is hardly a non-biased organization. It was founded by an avowed Socialist, Robert W. McChesney. Of course they want increased restrictions under the guise of "neutrality". That's how these types of groups operate.

Hurricane Andrew said,
Free Press is hardly a non-biased organization. It was founded by an avowed Socialist, Robert W. McChesney. Of course they want increased restrictions under the guise of "neutrality". That's how these types of groups operate.

To be fair, applying a rule for one group but not another, because of such an arbitrary variance (they're wireless carriers), doesn't make sense - regardless of the founder's background. And should therefore be brought to the courts to at least find out why they've done it like this.

Hurricane Andrew said,
Free Press is hardly a non-biased organization. It was founded by an avowed Socialist, Robert W. McChesney. Of course they want increased restrictions under the guise of "neutrality". That's how these types of groups operate.

Exactly!

It's all a game to see who can have the most control over you; the ISPs or the George Orwellian Socialist groups like Free Press.

dogmai79 said,
Why should wireless live by a different set of rules?

Because that's what the CTIA paid for. Otherwise, what would the carriers do with all that money we send them every month if they weren't paying off lobbyists and Congress? Network infrastructure upgrades to support demand growth so that net neutrality laws aren't necessary?

dogmai79 said,
Why should wireless live by a different set of rules?

I suppose the sensible answer would be because they suffer from lower bandwidth across their network. Even so, it's kind of backward to enforce net neutrality laws on some areas of providers' networks and not others.