Netflix now allows users to change video quality

It's now a known fact that in the US, the single biggest source for broadband traffic comes from customers streaming videos of movies and TV shows from the Netflix service. It's also a known fact that more and more Internet providers are putting in place broadband caps, some of which will certainly be broken by customers who do a lot of Netflix streaming. Now Netflix has quetly put in a tool that should help customers with managing their data usage.

According to DSLReports.com Netflix customers can now change the video quality of the videos being streamed via the official Netflix web site. According to the site, "We offer 3 video quality settings to help you manage your data usage. No matter what level you choose, your Netflix membership price will remain the same."

The lowest setting offers up video at 625 kbps and audio at 64 kbps. Using this setting will allow a customer to stream 30 hours of video with a data download of 9 GB a month. The medium setting increases the video to 1300 kbps with audio raised to 192 kpbs. This level lets customers download about 20 GB of data for the same 30 hours of streaming video. The maximum quality setting will allow Netflix customers to have up to 4800 kbps for video (that's enough to support 1080p TV resolutions) and 384 kbps for audio, but the amount of data used at that setting jumps up drastically to 67 GB for 30 hours of video.

In the past Netflix has tried to prove that broadband caps imposed by some ISPs are just money grabs, claiming that the amount of data used by customers is far more affordable than what Internet service providers have claimed.

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I just read this on Netflix BLOG:WARNING: NETFLIX is next target of ANONYMOUS and LULZSEC. This is what happens when you don't listen to your customers.

UR CREDIT CARD DATA WILL BE EXPOSED:
Users, close any credit cards in their system.


^^**** YOU LULZSEC GO **** A STEER BUNCH OF FAGS YOU ARE BUNCH OF WORTHLESS LOW LIVES I BET THEY RENT BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN LIKE SOME ****ING HOLIDAY!

TsMkLg068426 said,
I just read this on Netflix BLOG:WARNING: NETFLIX is next target of ANONYMOUS and LULZSEC. This is what happens when you don't listen to your customers.

UR CREDIT CARD DATA WILL BE EXPOSED:
Users, close any credit cards in their system.


^^**** YOU LULZSEC GO **** A STEER BUNCH OF FAGS YOU ARE BUNCH OF WORTHLESS LOW LIVES I BET THEY RENT BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN LIKE SOME ****ING HOLIDAY!

1) How has Netflix not listened to their customers? If this was HULU I could make a good argument, but don't see the uprising or outrage at Netflix.

2) Why would the hackers sexuality have anything to do with this, and why are you interesting in their sexuality? If you need someone to talk to, there are a lot of people online and free health clinics that you can visit if you are questioning your sexuality.

TsMkLg068426 said,
I just read this on Netflix BLOG:WARNING: NETFLIX is next target of ANONYMOUS and LULZSEC. This is what happens when you don't listen to your customers.

UR CREDIT CARD DATA WILL BE EXPOSED:
Users, close any credit cards in their system.


^^**** YOU LULZSEC GO **** A STEER BUNCH OF FAGS YOU ARE BUNCH OF WORTHLESS LOW LIVES I BET THEY RENT BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN LIKE SOME ****ING HOLIDAY!

To put it bluntly you're full of manure up to your eyeballs.

There is no such statement on http://blog.netflix.com which is THE Netflix blog.

Go back to your bridge.

Mountain Dew said,

To put it bluntly you're full of manure up to your eyeballs.

There is no such statement on http://blog.netflix.com which is THE Netflix blog.

Go back to your bridge.

You are a retard try this: http://blog.netflix.com/2011/0...removal-of-sony-movies.html

Blog Topic: "Temporary Removal of Sony Movies through StarzPlay"

Do a little research before talking **** noob.

It is still up there learn to also read comments, please tell me you know how to use the internet right?

thenetavenger said,

1) How has Netflix not listened to their customers? If this was HULU I could make a good argument, but don't see the uprising or outrage at Netflix.

2) Why would the hackers sexuality have anything to do with this, and why are you interesting in their sexuality? If you need someone to talk to, there are a lot of people online and free health clinics that you can visit if you are questioning your sexuality.


LulzSec sexuality is a question because their actions are really gay and pathetic.

nekrosoft13 said,
"The maximum quality setting will allow Netflix customers to have up to 4800 kbps"

for 1080p that is pathetic

Um, no...

It would be pathetic for 1080P MPEG2, but this isn't 1992 or 1999.

When using VC1 or H.264, 4.5-5mbps is the same quality as a 30mbps MPEG2 BluRay or other MPEG2 stream for 1080p content. VC1 and H.264 can also do 720p in 1.5-2 mbps, bringing 720p HD to DSL users.

If you want full uncompressed 1080p, you would need about 2.5-3gbps - which is not something you can fit on a BluRay Disc or stream.

People get caught in the MPEG2 bandwidth thinking, and also don't understand what 1080p means either.

The over the air HD in the US (ATSC) uses MPEG2, so it requires a lot of bandwidth, but compression technology moved forward from MPEG2 that is over 20 years old, which is why we have VC1 and H.264 that can give us the same quality but requires far less storage space and bandwidth. This is also why the ATSC added H.264 in 2009, but is not yet widely used.

As for streaming or storing 1080p, we don't even need BluRay, as true 1080p content can fit on a dual-layer DVD, which Microsoft tried to get the world to realize over 10 years ago, but at that time, they were still stuck on MPEG2 concepts and bandwidth needs. (There was a version of T2 released on a dual-layer DVD, that was the same 1080p quality we get today, and it used VC1(WMV).) - Also go look up BD9, it is 1080p HD on a regular DVD.

The other thing people get confused with is 1080p and they don't realize that Films/Movies are converted to 1080p 24fps, so it is not 1080p 60fps like most people think. Even TV programs are only 1080p 24fps or 1080i 60fps. (Both of which use about the same bandwidth due to the FPS differences, with 1080i actually using more 'bandwidth' especially when the compression technology is considered.)

So using VC1 or H.264, 4800 kbps is really good quality 1080p content, as Netflix is streaming 24fps movies or 1080i 60pfs converted TV shows.

Netflix also uses a more buffered variation of 'smooth stream' developed by Microsoft, which is why Netflix uses Silverlight and Microsoft video technologies. This allows HD content to ramp up and also gracefully fluctuate based on the connection quality without the horrid 'buffering...' crap that you get with other video streaming technologies. This method also allows them to buffer and stuff even higher quality content into the stream beyond 4800 kbps if the content is there and the user has the bandwidth.

So I disagree, this is what 1080p HD content should be and essentially is for most people. There are some newer exceptions as Avatar was converted and released as 1080p 60fps and the 3D versions of it and other movies take more bandwidth, but Netflix isn't doing this yet.

Here is a good example of smooth streaming and also shows 1080p in the bandwidth that Netflix is using. http://www.iis.net/media/experiencesmoothstreaming1080p

thenetavenger said,
It would be pathetic for 1080P MPEG2, but this isn't 1992 or 1999.

When using VC1 or H.264, 4.5-5mbps is the same quality as a 30mbps MPEG2 BluRay or other MPEG2 stream for 1080p content. VC1 and H.264 can also do 720p in 1.5-2 mbps, bringing 720p HD to DSL users.

Sorry, but this is insane. 4.8Mbps is subpar for TRUE 1080p detail, no matter the codec. It's been proven again and again that the best looking Blu-rays in AVC usually have bitrates in the range of 25-35Mbps. Blu-rays that use low bitrate VC-1, like "Superman Returns", "Troy", and "Batman Begins" have terrible banding issues and soft detail and their minimum bitrates are still TWICE what Netflix is offering at a *maximum*.

Netflix on a 40" plus HDTV looks like really good DVD.

FMH said,
We could be greener if everyone reduced their video quality.

Would be greener if we stopped watching videos and planted trees as well, but its not happening with my bad ass HDTV

shakey said,

Would be greener if we stopped watching videos and planted trees as well, but its not happening with my bad ass HDTV

hell yeah

Pushed mine up to Best - the hell with Comcast and their cap.. I'll push it all the way to 250 per month EVERY month!!!!

I say I wish they didn't put this feature in. Now all this does is allows the ISP's to get away with keeping their caps. If every company started utilizing the Internet more than the ISP's would be forced to remove or raise the caps. Having caps, IMO, limits growth.

notta said,
I say I wish they didn't put this feature in. Now all this does is allows the ISP's to get away with keeping their caps. If every company started utilizing the Internet more than the ISP's would be forced to remove or raise the caps. Having caps, IMO, limits growth.

^This 100%!

"In the past Netflix has tried to prove that broadband caps imposed by some ISPs are just money grabs, claiming that the amount of data used by customers is far more affordable than what Internet service providers have claimed."
...and most of us would agree completely. It's a naked cash grab by the ISPs, as well as a move to block customers from using a service that competes against their own overpriced offerings.

NoLiMiT06 said,
That's great, now they need that feature on the consoles as well and we will be set

Umm this is done on the website so any client connecting using the account will get whatever speeds that are set.

SHoTTa35 said,

Umm this is done on the website so any client connecting using the account will get whatever speeds that are set.

Has that been confirmed to work though for the consoles? If so, that is really cool.

I don't see why it wouldn't, the client just asks for data - not for specific bandwidth and all that. The server then checks it's settings and says ok this account streams at "Good" and starts sending "Good" quality down the pipe.

SHoTTa35 said,
I don't see why it wouldn't, the client just asks for data - not for specific bandwidth and all that. The server then checks it's settings and says ok this account streams at "Good" and starts sending "Good" quality down the pipe.

There seems to be some confusion here. To clarify, the bandwidth settings are set through the account management page when you log in to netflix.com, not while you are watching a movie or through configuration settings in the game consoles.