Netherlands Adopts Open-Source Software

The Dutch government has set a soft deadline of April 2008 for its agencies to start using open-source software - freely distributed programs that anyone can modify - the Netherlands Economic Affairs Ministry said Thursday. Government organizations will still be able to use proprietary software and formats but will have to justify it under the new policy, ministry spokesman Edwin van Scherrenburg said. Van Scherrenburg said the plan was approved unanimously at a meeting of two parliamentary commissions on Wednesday. Many governments worldwide have begun testing open-source software to cut costs and eliminate dependency on individual companies such as Microsoft Corp.

The government estimates it would save $8.8 million a year on city housing registers alone after switching to open source. Microsoft has raced to achieve "open source" certification for its Open Office XML standard, but has so far failed to receive endorsement from the International Standards Organization, the certifying authority recognized by the Dutch government. Microsoft Netherlands spokesman Hans Bos noted that its Word documents were still allowed as equal alternatives for the moment and said he expects the company to receive approval soon for its Open Office XML to qualify as open source.

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well ... i do support the idea of open source to cut costs. hell with that money they could implement housing or some enviromently firnedly technologies ... good for them

This article stinks. Too much confusion on the part of the original journalist between "open source" and "open standards". One can have a closed source app use open standards for file interchange (which this article specifically confused on Microsofts OOXML).

Open Standards for a government is a no-brainer, in my opinion. Open source (as much as I support it), is much less relevant - unless cost savings can be achieved.

good to hear the less governments spend on software and stuff the better imo hope the uk follow suit , then again the IT in the uk government level is a laughing stock