New details emerge on quad-core HTC Edge phone

Jaws dropped, eyebrows were raised, and gasps were, er, gasped yesterday, as news emerged of HTC’s Edge, a handset powerhouse packing a 1.5GHz quad-core processor and 4.7” display. More details have now surfaced of the new device, and it sounds like it’s going to be an absolute beast.

So what do we know now that we didn’t know yesterday? Let’s start with the display. The 4.7” screen will be of the S-LCD variety with HD (1280x720) resolution. BGR reports that the display will include optical lamination, a feature included on high-end devices such as the iPhone 4/4S that bonds the external glass of the handset to the display panel itself. Also known as optical bonding, this process eliminates the presence of dust between the two layers and helps to reduce glare, making the screen easier to view in most lighting conditions.

We knew yesterday that the Edge would include an 8MP camera; we now know that it will be capable of 1080p Full HD video recording, along with a backlit sensor to improve performance in low light. Interestingly, the front-facing camera will be HD too, capable of streaming and recording video at 720p – a lot better than the VGA or 1.3MP cameras found on the front of many smartphones today.

The handset itself, with its sleek, tapered design, is an aluminium unibody, just 8.8mm thick at its chunkiest point. As reported yesterday, there’s 1GB of RAM on board, along with 32GB of storage, although with no microSD card slot, that 32GB will be the limit.

The Edge will also include Bluetooth 4.0, NFC and Beats Audio, along with an 1800mAh battery (although with these specs, it’s anyone’s guess how long it’ll last in use), as well as a microSIM card slot. Count on Android 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich) running the show when this baby arrives in early 2012.

HTC is clearly determined to give Samsung’s recently announced Galaxy Nexus a run for its money, with a spec sheet that’s certainly competitive with that of its rival. The ferocious quad-core 1.5GHz Tegra 3 processor - formerly known as 'Kal-El', and officially announced by NVIDIA today - may just give the HTC the edge over its rival to be the new king of the Android hill.

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I agree with Lorddresefer, I think quad core phone are abit pointless for the time being, cant see anything taking advantage of the power, unless you were to hook it up to ur tv for HD viewing? or whatever..i dunno...tablets having quad seems more reasonable

I understand that some people would prefer a Samsung to an HTC, but why are people nuthugging the Galaxy Nexus when the GS2 is still a much superior phone? :0

Im surprised that the actual batteries have not improved by now. Why dont they use stronger batteries? 1800 mAh on the battery still?

not so sure quad core is what we need yet. dual cores SHOULD be enough to play hardcore mobile games (remember when computers first went dual core?) Also why does every HTC android device look the same? I'd much rather have a galaxy nexus even if it "only" has 2 cores. should be plenty, especially with ICS performance tweaks. quad core tablets I could understand a bit better but the line is being severely blurred between phones and tablets. Really hoping ICS really utilizes dual cores as much as they say. just waiting for the cyanogen ICS rom for my optimus v! XD

Count on Android 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich) running the show when this baby arrives in early 2012.

I guarantee you that it won't look much different than Gingerbread Sense based phone. The Sense Framework is heavily integrated into the HTC phones that it will be difficult to distinguish the two. Is that a problem? NO! For people that love Sense, they will get this phone. For people that want a stock experience, they will get the SGN.

Quad core?

Android's Dalvik is managing the threads, with little support from the Linux kernel, and is already having trouble getting performance out of dual-core phones/tablets.

This is good marketing, but for actual performance seems like it will be more of a battery drain, especially with the limited ability to suspend core states that Android incorporates.

Even if it wasn't Android with the Dalvik JVM, Linux itself starts having overhead on quad core/cpu systems where management of threads and processes starts decreasing performance gains from the extra cores.

Dumping out more high end Android phones seems like a bit of overly optimistic OEMs that are hoping Google will magically learn how to build a proper OS that can extend to support newer technologies. Either that, or they are using it as pure marketing and a test bed for upcoming WP8 and/or Windows 8 tablets.

People that doubt Android's inherent problems of scalability need to spend time studying OS models.

Or just go to a retailer like BestBuy and grab the fast Android Tablet or Phone you can find and then grab the lowest end WP7 phone, right now being the HTC Trophy. Open a few web pages or 3D applications on both, and notice that not a single Android device can keep up with the WP7 phone no matter if it is flipping between and loading applications, base UI tests (due to the GPU limitations of Android) and even pure 3D performance comparing DirectX(XNA) to OpenGL ES on Android. Even Web content can be surprising, on complex sites, the WP7 phone will be smooth, where the Android Tablets and Phones start to struggle to keep up. This is especially true of higher end HTML5/CSS web content. Run the older IETestDrive Fish example in a browser. On the WP7 device, you will get 30fps or 60fps depending on which of the first generation WP7 phones you grab. On Android getting over 25fps even on a high end Android Tablet (rendering at the same resolution) would be miraculous.

This becomes more apparent on Tablets running on Intel Atom technology, as the Android tablets are slower than the full desktop version of Windows 7, and with just as demanding RAM requirements. Which is fairly conclusive that Android's performance problems are fundamental flaws in the OS model.

Windows 8's offering a Metro Shell seems to have Google a bit concerned, yet they are still scrambling to duck tape Android, instead of address low level OS flaws that will relegate it to a passing technology, as we have seen with many trendy OS that worked in their generation but were unable to progress beyond that generation.

Seriously, Quad Core Android phone? A single Core WP7 phone is still faster, maybe fix the OS first, then move to higher end hardware if Google or anyone see Android as having a future.

thenetavenger said,
Quad core?

Android's Dalvik is managing the threads, with little support from the Linux kernel, and is already having trouble getting performance out of dual-core phones/tablets.

This is good marketing, but for actual performance seems like it will be more of a battery drain, especially with the limited ability to suspend core states that Android incorporates.

Even if it wasn't Android with the Dalvik JVM, Linux itself starts having overhead on quad core/cpu systems where management of threads and processes starts decreasing performance gains from the extra cores.

Dumping out more high end Android phones seems like a bit of overly optimistic OEMs that are hoping Google will magically learn how to build a proper OS that can extend to support newer technologies. Either that, or they are using it as pure marketing and a test bed for upcoming WP8 and/or Windows 8 tablets.

People that doubt Android's inherent problems of scalability need to spend time studying OS models.

Or just go to a retailer like BestBuy and grab the fast Android Tablet or Phone you can find and then grab the lowest end WP7 phone, right now being the HTC Trophy. Open a few web pages or 3D applications on both, and notice that not a single Android device can keep up with the WP7 phone no matter if it is flipping between and loading applications, base UI tests (due to the GPU limitations of Android) and even pure 3D performance comparing DirectX(XNA) to OpenGL ES on Android. Even Web content can be surprising, on complex sites, the WP7 phone will be smooth, where the Android Tablets and Phones start to struggle to keep up. This is especially true of higher end HTML5/CSS web content. Run the older IETestDrive Fish example in a browser. On the WP7 device, you will get 30fps or 60fps depending on which of the first generation WP7 phones you grab. On Android getting over 25fps even on a high end Android Tablet (rendering at the same resolution) would be miraculous.

This becomes more apparent on Tablets running on Intel Atom technology, as the Android tablets are slower than the full desktop version of Windows 7, and with just as demanding RAM requirements. Which is fairly conclusive that Android's performance problems are fundamental flaws in the OS model.

Windows 8's offering a Metro Shell seems to have Google a bit concerned, yet they are still scrambling to duck tape Android, instead of address low level OS flaws that will relegate it to a passing technology, as we have seen with many trendy OS that worked in their generation but were unable to progress beyond that generation.

Seriously, Quad Core Android phone? A single Core WP7 phone is still faster, maybe fix the OS first, then move to higher end hardware if Google or anyone see Android as having a future.

Bla bla bla, bla bla bla...

And why is possible that HTC Titan and Lumia 800 has the worse results in sunspider and BrowserMark?

Maybe the answer is that the test does not have IE in front?

http://thenextweb.com/microsof...otographed-and-benchmarked/

Go to tell your Windows Phone Mango lies to another site, please.

And what will happen when someone asks Microsoft to make a game like Infinity Blade II for Windows Phone?

The answer will be clear, it's not possible on a single core phone.

Pepeda said,

Bla bla bla, bla bla bla...

And why is possible that HTC Titan and Lumia 800 has the worse results in sunspider and BrowserMark?

Maybe the answer is that the test does not have IE in front?

http://thenextweb.com/microsof...otographed-and-benchmarked/

Go to tell your Windows Phone Mango lies to another site, please.

And what will happen when someone asks Microsoft to make a game like Infinity Blade II for Windows Phone?

The answer will be clear, it's not possible on a single core phone.


WP7 performs worse in javascript and html5 due to its lower specs, but IE9's rendering engine is superior to that of android's.

Muhammad Farrukh said,

You, sir, have absolutely nailed it.

and you have proven your a wp7 troll. why do you even bother coming in the android threads?

smooth3006 said,

and you have proven your a wp7 troll. why do you even bother coming in the android threads?

and you're an Android troll who always posts in the WP7 and Windows 8 threads. Maybe you should ask yourself that question.

NegroWatermelon said,

WP7 performs worse in javascript and html5 due to its lower specs, but IE9's rendering engine is superior to that of android's.

I can accept, discuss or search information about rendering engines, and for sure searching for same (or almost same) hardware will be a better aproach to benchamrks. Surely, IE9 and Android Browser will not be so distant with same hardware, maybe better in some areas, maybe worse in others.

In any case, will try to find some benchmarks and discuss them.

But what I cannot accept is a troll saying "The cheapest WP7 is better in ALL versus every Android Phone or Tablet".

UndergroundWire said,

But not games!


Thats why developers are not making graphically intensive games for WP, it just doesn't have the required processing capabilities to do so. GTA3 won't even be released for WP because "the current hardware lacks power".

yowan said,

Thats why developers are not making graphically intensive games for WP, it just doesn't have the required processing capabilities to do so. GTA3 won't even be released for WP because "the current hardware lacks power".

Exactly. The WP fan boys can say other wise, but not releasing these phones hold them back in hardware intensive games and applications.

Cool specs too bad they ruin it by omitting basics like microsd full size sim and pretty rubbish battery. This will maybe be first to market like the asus prime transformer tablet but it will be a damn sight far from the best of the quad core generation.

Digitalx said,
...too bad they ruin it by omitting basics like microsd full size sim...

I don't see what the big problem is. 32Gb is a lot. Hell, even the 16Gb of the Galaxy Nexus will be far enough for me. I've been running my desire with about 40Mb of spare space and an 8Gb card which is using around 1Gb maybe of space.

What the hell do people carry around with them that needs so much space? Don't tell me people actually watch movies on their phone on the bus? Ha ha, movies are for 40"+ TVs

"although with no microSD card slot"
[...]
"will include ... a microSIM card slot."
So will it have one or not?

On the inside, specs are breathtaking (except for the battery: only 1800 mAh?), on the outside on the other hand; the Edge looks just like any other HTC Android phone. Why do all HTC phones look-a-like?

I know the unibody, the four buttons on the bottom and the grill on top of the phone are their trademark, but come on... If I'd have a Sensation and I would replace it by the Edge, it would feel like replacing an iPhone 4 by an iPhone 4S

ohlordie said,
"although with no microSD card slot"
[...]
"will include ... a microSIM card slot."
So will it have one or not?

microSIM and microSD are two different things.

ohlordie said,
"although with no microSD card slot"
[...]
"will include ... a microSIM card slot."
So will it have one or not?

On the inside, specs are breathtaking (except for the battery: only 1800 mAh?), on the outside on the other hand; the Edge looks just like any other HTC Android phone. Why do all HTC phones look-a-like?

I know the unibody, the four buttons on the bottom and the grill on top of the phone are their trademark, but come on... If I'd have a Sensation and I would replace it by the Edge, it would feel like replacing an iPhone 4 by an iPhone 4S

You don't know your technology do you? MicroSD and Micro SIM are two very different things.

UndergroundWire said,

You don't know your technology do you? MicroSD and Micro SIM are two very different things.

I misread, I apologize. I do know what MicroSD and Micro SIM are...

ohlordie said,
I misread, I apologize. I do know what MicroSD and Micro SIM are...

MicroSD is what you think it is. External Storage Space. Micro SIM is for the 4G LTE. Since 4G LTE is based off GSM Technology, you will also find Micro SIM on the iPhone and other GSM phones that don't have 4G LTE as well.

UndergroundWire said,

MicroSD is what you think it is. External Storage Space. Micro SIM is for the 4G LTE. Since 4G LTE is based off GSM Technology, you will also find Micro SIM on the iPhone and other GSM phones that don't have 4G LTE as well.

He said he knows what MicroSD and MicroSIM are..

Hardcore Til I Die said,

He said he knows what MicroSD and MicroSIM are..

I don't he does or he doesn't know how to read. Before anybody else makes this foolish mistake, I put it out there. THANK YOU FOR YOUR USELESS INPUT.

Have a great day.

UndergroundWire said,

I don't he does or he doesn't know how to read. Before anybody else makes this foolish mistake, I put it out there. THANK YOU FOR YOUR USELESS INPUT.

Have a great day.

PaulCabby had already mentioned that the two were different before you then repeated what he'd said. ohlordie then explained that he'd misread the text, and apologised for that; he also pointed out that he does in fact understand the distinction between the two, before you then decided to explain it anyway.

So there wasn't really a need for your explanation, but even if there had been, there was no need for the attitude. Your input in this instance has, frankly, been more useless than anyone else's.

gcaw said,

PaulCabby had already mentioned that the two were different before you then repeated what he'd said. ohlordie then explained that he'd misread the text, and apologised for that; he also pointed out that he does in fact understand the distinction between the two, before you then decided to explain it anyway.

So there wasn't really a need for your explanation, but even if there had been, there was no need for the attitude. Your input in this instance has, frankly, been more useless than anyone else's.

See my explanation above. Then STAY QUIET!

For those complaining about battery life, read up on the transformer prime. While running quad core it has a low power 5th core for general use, keeping things moving along nicely while using minimal battery. The full power is brought out for intensive tasks and regardless of how efficient battery usage/os/games are these high end tasks are going to drain the battery. It's a trade off that's simply required.

That sure is good news for Android.
Hope HTC gets it right this time
I'm not sure about that picture though.
If it is gonna run ICS wouldn't there be just three buttons?

Muhammad Farrukh said,
That sure is good news for Android.
Hope HTC gets it right this time
I'm not sure about that picture though.
If it is gonna run ICS wouldn't there be just three buttons?

Some current handsets have three or four capacitative buttons, the SGS2 has three with search being replaced with a long press on the menu button so either would work. Arguably you could ask why are there any buttons at all if its ICS based as buttons aren't necessary but HTC may either be launching this on GB or simply prefer hardware/capacitative buttons.

Muhammad Farrukh said,
That sure is good news for Android.
Hope HTC gets it right this time
I'm not sure about that picture though.
If it is gonna run ICS wouldn't there be just three buttons?

Actually there would be no buttons if it is running Stock ICS. However, most people fail to realize that when running frameworks such as Sense, TouchWiz, or Blur, then these buttons don't have to go away. You see, HTC will not reinvent Sense for ICS. So this picture can be a 100% accurate even if it is coming out with ICS.

Hollow.Droid said,

Some current handsets have three or four capacitative buttons, the SGS2 has three with search being replaced with a long press on the menu button so either would work. Arguably you could ask why are there any buttons at all if its ICS based as buttons aren't necessary but HTC may either be launching this on GB or simply prefer hardware/capacitative buttons.

Current handsets were released before ICS was announced.
But this phone here hasn't been even announced, it is only a rumor and if that picture is legit, then there is no reason why they wont have ICS on it and if they do, I dont see the need for four buttons

Muhammad Farrukh said,

Current handsets were released before ICS was announced.
But this phone here hasn't been even announced, it is only a rumor and if that picture is legit, then there is no reason why they wont have ICS on it and if they do, I dont see the need for four buttons

There isn't any NEED but the OS will work exactly the same with or without hardware/capacitative buttons. If the phone has them then the virtual ones aren't displayed, if it doesn't they are. Some manufacturers/devices will still implement them, others won't. It's just another area to give the end user more choice.

Hollow.Droid said,

There isn't any NEED but the OS will work exactly the same with or without hardware/capacitative buttons. If the phone has them then the virtual ones aren't displayed, if it doesn't they are. Some manufacturers/devices will still implement them, others won't. It's just another area to give the end user more choice.

You guys are missing the point. HTC will not reinvent SENSE because ICS sandwich is released. The hardware buttons is used for SENSE.

Look at STOCK Eclair, Froyo, Gingerbread, ICS. The UI changed.
Now look at it with Sense. The UI hasn't changed.

UndergroundWire said,

You guys are missing the point. HTC will not reinvent SENSE because ICS sandwich is released. The hardware buttons is used for SENSE.

Look at STOCK Eclair, Froyo, Gingerbread, ICS. The UI changed.
Now look at it with Sense. The UI hasn't changed.

So you've decided that HTC will ignore the option of virtual buttons simply to keep in line with sense? That's a pretty big assumption. ICS is by far the biggest leap in UI overhaul that android has seen, it's not unreasonable to think that manufacturers will implement significant changes of their own. That's not to say that sense won't retain its usual buttons/functionality but restricting themselves to capacitative buttons as a result of being stubborn/not wanting to introduce too much change is very narrow minded.

Hollow.Droid said,

So you've decided that HTC will ignore the option of virtual buttons simply to keep in line with sense? That's a pretty big assumption. ICS is by far the biggest leap in UI overhaul that android has seen, it's not unreasonable to think that manufacturers will implement significant changes of their own. That's not to say that sense won't retain its usual buttons/functionality but restricting themselves to capacitative buttons as a result of being stubborn/not wanting to introduce too much change is very narrow minded.

Yeah, well a lot of people that buy HTC phones don't know they are buying an Android phone. Likewise, with TouchWiz and Blur. These frameworks allow these manufacturers too stand out from the rest.

From a business sense, (pardon the pun), HTC will not depart from that. They have been successful at it. I'll ask you, Why would they depart from something that has been successful? You are making assumptions then. See me in a few months when the first Sense ICS phone is released. I'll be the one laughing at people that doubted this.

UndergroundWire said,

Yeah, well a lot of people that buy HTC phones don't know they are buying an Android phone. Likewise, with TouchWiz and Blur. These frameworks allow these manufacturers too stand out from the rest.

From a business sense, (pardon the pun), HTC will not depart from that. They have been successful at it. I'll ask you, Why would they depart from something that has been successful? You are making assumptions then. See me in a few months when the first Sense ICS phone is released. I'll be the one laughing at people that doubted this.

I made no attempt at stating that the buttons will be removed, simply that HTC have a much larger arsenal of features at their disposal so limiting themselves to three buttons with very little change would be a silly move on their part. Then again so would removing it. My best guess is that they'll remain, but will hopefully introduce a larger feature set and UI overhaul. Would you purchase a HTC device if Samsung, Motorola and a host of other manufactures have a long list of devices actively taking advantage of ICS while HTC remain stagnant?

Hollow.Droid said,

I made no attempt at stating that the buttons will be removed, simply that HTC have a much larger arsenal of features at their disposal so limiting themselves to three buttons with very little change would be a silly move on their part. Then again so would removing it. My best guess is that they'll remain, but will hopefully introduce a larger feature set and UI overhaul. Would you purchase a HTC device if Samsung, Motorola and a host of other manufactures have a long list of devices actively taking advantage of ICS while HTC remain stagnant?

You're talking to a person who knows the difference with these phones. Personally I love Sense. But my last three phones have been with Sense. I am looking for a stock experience. The average consumer when looking at phones judge it by how pretty it is. HTC has done well by that and would be stupid to go a different direction.

On a side note, anybody that knows Android, knows that stock is the way to go. But I guarantee you that the SGN will not sell as well as the Droid RAZR or HTC Rezound.

We can agree to disagree for now, but in a few months, one of us will be right.

HTC of all companies really should be focusing more on battery life and less on power. Once my phone can last morning till evening without needing to plugged in, they can start with the specs again. Seriously.

chAos972 said,
HTC of all companies really should be focusing more on battery life and less on power. Once my phone can last morning till evening without needing to plugged in, they can start with the specs again. Seriously.

Quite frankly I don't care about battery life. Unlike the Droid RAZR and iPhone, the battery is removable. How long will it take to switch the battery? As far as I am concerned focus more on a better camera sensor.

chAos972 said,
HTC of all companies really should be focusing more on battery life and less on power. Once my phone can last morning till evening without needing to plugged in, they can start with the specs again. Seriously.

Using the same battery and screen, a quad-core processor will spend less battery than a dual core or single core

I know that battery should improve a lot, but more powerful processors that spend less is always good.

I bet that a better screen technology is on the priority list of manufacturers to reduce consumption.

UndergroundWire said,

Quite frankly I don't care about battery life. Unlike the Droid RAZR and iPhone, the battery is removable. How long will it take to switch the battery? As far as I am concerned focus more on a better camera sensor.

Actually, that is true, doesn't take much time to switch to a second battery. What phone companies should be doing is focusing more on this idea and maybe implementing 12 minute battery charge in the phone so you can swap a battery out. I know some laptops in the past had this feature. This saves the user from powering down the phone.

Tony. said,

Actually, that is true, doesn't take much time to switch to a second battery. What phone companies should be doing is focusing more on this idea and maybe implementing 12 minute battery charge in the phone so you can swap a battery out. I know some laptops in the past had this feature. This saves the user from powering down the phone.

That is an excellent idea.