New Ethernet standard aims for between 400Gbps and 1Tbps

The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers announced Monday the formation of the IEEE 802.3 Industry Connections Higher Speed Ethernet Consensus group, the goal of which is to develop the next generation of Ethernet technology with far greater speeds than today's current standards.

IEEE's research concluded that core networking bandwidth was observed to double every 18 months, on average, according to an IEEE Ethernet bandwidth assessment published in July (PDF). "For 2015, we expect the bandwidth that needs to be supported to be 10 times what it was in 2010, and in 2020, 100 times what it was in 2010," said John D'Ambrosia, chair of the new consensus group. New Ethernet standards with higher bandwidth capabilities will be required to keep up with this growth.

Currently, members of the IEEE consensus group are figuring out whether 400 gigabits per second or 1 terabit per second is the way to go for the next generation of Ethernet.

While the higher bandwidth of 1 Tbps sounds like the obvious winner, there are other factors to consider aside from just speed. For example, terabit-speed hardware is not as practical economically for both hardware manufacturers and their customers, the users of the hardware. Additionally, the 80 connections required for two-way terabit data transfer speeds would make for a cable of huge, unwieldy proportions.

Either way, laying the groundwork for the next generation of Ethernet is an important step, because it will make the process of future upgrades faster. While there is currently no set date for the new standard, D'Ambrosia told CNET that he "suspect(s) this is going to be a very fast-moving project."

Source: CNET

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xpclient said,
It will land up in server hardware right away and will probably take a hundreds years to reach end users.

Still waiting for 10GbE to be affordable for our customers, the enterprise is where this is at!

Wowza. Will they make it look modern though? thats my only gripe with Fibre, everything looks so darn old and grey

Enron said,
Make it orange and it will scream!

Aren't fibre-optic "patch" cables (not sure what they are called) usually orange, yellow or some other bright colors?

torrentthief said,
meh, can we just make 10gb ethernet ports standard on routers, pc's and laptops first?

Why not skip straight to better speeds?

Pupik said,

Why not skip straight to better speeds?

Are we all forgetting switches here? most people are still buying cheap and nasty 10/100Mbps switches for home and even businesses are lagging as far as Gigabit is concerned (look at the prices for a decent 48 port Gigabit switch compared to the same model in 10/100). Now go googling for a 10Gigabit switch and a network card and watch in horror as the price hits you like a tonne of bricks!

duddit2 said,

Are we all forgetting switches here? most people are still buying cheap and nasty 10/100Mbps switches for home and even businesses are lagging as far as Gigabit is concerned (look at the prices for a decent 48 port Gigabit switch compared to the same model in 10/100). Now go googling for a 10Gigabit switch and a network card and watch in horror as the price hits you like a tonne of bricks!

http://www.lambda-tek.com/DXS-...T-10GIGABIT-SFP-~cs/B895648

duddit2 said,

Are we all forgetting switches here? most people are still buying cheap and nasty 10/100Mbps switches for home and even businesses are lagging as far as Gigabit is concerned (look at the prices for a decent 48 port Gigabit switch compared to the same model in 10/100). Now go googling for a 10Gigabit switch and a network card and watch in horror as the price hits you like a tonne of bricks!


Does the average computer hobo need 1gbit? Barely anyone's internet is even over 20mbps, let alone like they constantly share very large files over the network... And 100mbps is more then plenty for multiple streaming services.
Cooperate networks might benefit from it, But usually they'll have enough with 1gbit connections.
Besides, considering just a few people are on SSD's, 1gbit is already overkill for almost everyone's hardrive anyways. PC cant cope with 1gbit, let alone 10gbit or 400gbit...

Shadowzz said,

Does the average computer hobo need 1gbit? Barely anyone's internet is even over 20mbps, let alone like they constantly share very large files over the network... And 100mbps is more then plenty for multiple streaming services.
Cooperate networks might benefit from it, But usually they'll have enough with 1gbit connections.
Besides, considering just a few people are on SSD's, 1gbit is already overkill for almost everyone's hardrive anyways. PC cant cope with 1gbit, let alone 10gbit or 400gbit...

Forgive me, but you must not know a lot about networking or have misread this article. At my house, with a 24 port Gb switch 1Gb NICs and CAT6 cabling, backing up my business content (mostly wedding photos and videos) from our computers to other devices such as SANs and servers), can take awhile to transfer... I'd be happy with 10Gb if the price were to drop.

No one mentioned an internet connection when talking about this technology and speed.

Shadowzz said,

Does the average computer hobo need 1gbit? Barely anyone's internet is even over 20mbps, let alone like they constantly share very large files over the network... And 100mbps is more then plenty for multiple streaming services.
Cooperate networks might benefit from it, But usually they'll have enough with 1gbit connections.
Besides, considering just a few people are on SSD's, 1gbit is already overkill for almost everyone's hardrive anyways. PC cant cope with 1gbit, let alone 10gbit or 400gbit...

srsly? every hard drive from the last 3-4 years has been able to churn out *at least* 100 MB/s, which is the top theoretical speed that 1Gbe can achieve (network connections use 8+2 parity bits per byte), so PC-to-PC or NAS-to-Media Center communications are already being bottlenecked by the network and not the hard drive speed.
Now get SSDs or RAID into the mix (which most high-end users around here have) and you see why 10Gbe was a needed upgrade.

Shadowzz said,

Does the average computer hobo need 1gbit? Barely anyone's internet is even over 20mbps, let alone like they constantly share very large files over the network... And 100mbps is more then plenty for multiple streaming services.
Cooperate networks might benefit from it, But usually they'll have enough with 1gbit connections.
Besides, considering just a few people are on SSD's, 1gbit is already overkill for almost everyone's hardrive anyways. PC cant cope with 1gbit, let alone 10gbit or 400gbit...

Seriously, don't bring internet speeds into a topic based on LAN technology - no one is saying this is needed for internet access, its about removing the local network bottleneck between PC's and devices.

Backups, multi device streaming, gaming, file transfers etc. can put a heavy load on a LAN. Faster speeds are always a good thing on a LAN, ALWAYS.

Put that with what others have said, how a single PC to PC transfer could saturate gigabit right now with nothing fancy - now add multiple PC's backing up to a central RAID based NAS box while at the same time streaming a movie to a console, nightmare! (agreed backups would usually run at night but that is mainly due to network congestion).

Now take a business environment, one where they are using virtual servers and want to utilise relatively cheap SAN storage base don iSCSI - 10GbE is the limit right now and is ok, depending on how many servers you have and the real time nature of them (SQL, VoiP etc.) and its clear a faster tech is needed.

Now my point was that 10GbE is way expensive right now, mainly due to everyone sticking with 10/100 gear because its good enough - which it really isn't, they just don't know it

duddit2 said,

Seriously, don't bring internet speeds into a topic based on LAN technology - no one is saying this is needed for internet access, its about removing the local network bottleneck between PC's and devices.

Backups, multi device streaming, gaming, file transfers etc. can put a heavy load on a LAN. Faster speeds are always a good thing on a LAN, ALWAYS.

Put that with what others have said, how a single PC to PC transfer could saturate gigabit right now with nothing fancy - now add multiple PC's backing up to a central RAID based NAS box while at the same time streaming a movie to a console, nightmare! (agreed backups would usually run at night but that is mainly due to network congestion).

Now take a business environment, one where they are using virtual servers and want to utilise relatively cheap SAN storage base don iSCSI - 10GbE is the limit right now and is ok, depending on how many servers you have and the real time nature of them (SQL, VoiP etc.) and its clear a faster tech is needed.

Now my point was that 10GbE is way expensive right now, mainly due to everyone sticking with 10/100 gear because its good enough - which it really isn't, they just don't know it

I agree with you that this is dealing with LAN not WAN however, how many people actually need anything beyond 100Mbit LAN connections?

Obviously there are those that work at home or that have a home business who could utilize something faster as some have pointed out here. Most do not. You can stream and transfer things just fine on a 100Mbit LAN.

The only need for a 400Gbit or a 1Tbit LAN connection is for those processing ridiculous amounts of data or maybe the god da** USS Enterprise. Data servers could use a Tb connection. Google could put it to use also. So in a way this does apply to the internet. However, a 1Tb home LAN is far beyond anything the average person needs. You need something faster? There are fairly simple ways to obtain those speeds.

Arceles said,
80 pin connectors... welcome back IDE ports

I would hate to be the poor network engineer that had to crimp this cable

Working on 25pair phone cable was bad enough, and that just terminated in to blocks