New tech could lead to much bigger hard drives

Researchers from Toshiba and Tohoku University in Japan have announced a new method of creating magnetic read heads that could boost hard drive storage density from the current record for a shipping product of 178.8Gb per square inch to beyond the 1Tb mark. The proposed next-generation technology would utilize Nanocontact Magnetic Resistance to boost the magnetoresistance of the drive head. Drive prototypes have demonstrated a magnetoresistance ratio that's twice as large as current read heads (140% at room temperature), as well as decreased resistances that should allow for further miniaturization of drive read heads. Toshiba doesn't expect to debut new drives based on the NC-MR design for another five years.

News source: Ars Technica

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now if we could only get programers to to do their jobs properly and and stop using extra code for bug fixing and tighten it up windows vista would only take up the same amount of space as windows 98se if we didnt have so much code bloat we wouldn't need such huge Hdd's personaly i cant wait for bio stroage imagine if you will all those dead people having there brains removed to be used as storage for pc's unlimited volume size and access times that make the fastest of solid state look like a wind up toy kinda like pushbike versus F1

I have a friend... his family has 6 computers. Between all the computers, over 4tb of storage, and they only have about 15% of that free. They do a LOT fo movie editing, and take nearly 10,000 photos a YEAR.

bigger is of course better...cuz files are getting bigger too...computer is getting more powerful...which means that we are able to run higher quality stuff on our computer...those stuff usually use more space...high def videos...high quality sounds...high quality pictures...high quality video games...windows vista...and so on...they all require more space...also, today's world is getting more and more informative than ever before...data will only increase...not decrease...

anyway, for me, space is not that important...i concern more about data security...it will be nice if they can also develop new hard drives that can resist shocks...this is a big disadvantage of hard drive...otherwise i will have to go with flash memory in the future...

Ya know, for all these news stories about new tech to make HDD's bigger (I feel like we get one of these about every other week), it seems that 500GB has been the upper limit for the mainstream market for quite a long while (obviously with larger options available, but those seem far less popular).

-Spenser

Yawn... can we please forget about HDD based storage and move to solid state, please? No need to defragment, no noise, much faster performance than any HDD (look at Gigabyte's I-RAM chips - especially demonstrations on YouTube showing how fast it is!)
Intel's latest mobos are getting rid of the IDE channels, so let's make mini-boards of 2,4,8,16,32,etc GB RAM sticks designed to run an OS and store files.

I have 2x160GB HDDs. I use the first one to only store my OS and Program Files which comes to 1.45 GB in total. Having this defragmented with UltimateDefrag places all of that at the beginning of the disk (outer track - only about 1/3 of it). Even when files fragment, it's still on the outer track so performance isn't affected anywhere remotely close to where a human being would notice it.
I would like to have 4 HDDs: OS, Program Files, Games, Storage.
But I would like even more to have 4x160GB RAM sticks (or some futuristic form of solid state storage that's extremely fast and does not fragment!)

Cheers.

Jeremy of Many said,
I would like to have 4 HDDs: OS, Program Files, Games, Storage.
But I would like even more to have 4x160GB RAM sticks (or some futuristic form of solid state storage that's extremely fast and does not fragment!)

Cheers.

If you can't wait, Dell has 32GB solid state ATA drives for sale. For the low price of $500 each.

http://accessories.us.dell.com/sna/product...p;c=us&l=en

There are 64GB models due out any day now. But I guess it's going to be another year at the minimum until any of them become affordable.

Still, it's going to be interesting to finally see the end of mechanical HDs. It's like the end of vinyl records or something.

I agree that research should be directed towards better storage solutions rather than milking the last drop out of old ones. The HDD is still one of the slowest components in any computer due to its mechanical nature. I truly hope that we will be all using affordable solid-state hard disks soon, at least for storing the OS and programs.

Bigger hard drives are great and everything, but you need large media to back the stuff that you put on them. Sure you can get blueray but even that only gives you 50 gigs a disc for a 1,024 gig drive. I like 250 gigs that a good amout and cheap enough so I can buy 2, being the other one is to backup the first one.

a larger hard drive is just means you can loose that much more stuff in a single drive failure

That's why raid was invented, but really, I have 4 drives that are over 4 years old and haven't even hinted at failing and they all run 24/7 so is disk failure really that big of a problem for you all? I guess it would be a real beech if they did fail but these Western Digital's seem to last forever.

Foxxx428 said,
That's why raid was invented, but really, I have 4 drives that are over 4 years old and haven't even hinted at failing and they all run 24/7 so is disk failure really that big of a problem for you all? I guess it would be a real beech if they did fail but these Western Digital's seem to last forever.

Yeah, I too have never had a disk failure that's resulted in the loss of unrecoverable data. But really, if you have a 1TB drive, how much of that data is actually really valuable to you?

Really, all you need to backup are your documents, your work and I suppose your game saves. 99% of people wont require more than 25Gb of space for all that, with only really the video editing people requiring so much.

I like 250 gigs that a good amout and cheap enough so I can buy 2, being the other one is to backup the first one.

This doesn't make sense to me. Pretty soon now, when a 1 TB drive will be as cheap as yesterday's 250 GB drive, why would one opt for 250 GB? It'll be just as easy to RAID two 1 TB drives. 250 GB's will probably even stop being produced, like 25 GB drives aren't made today. It's just the regular progress of technology, and people will probably always find something to fill the drives with too -- they always did in the past at least. :P

Foxxx428 said,
That's why raid was invented, but really, I have 4 drives that are over 4 years old and haven't even hinted at failing and they all run 24/7 so is disk failure really that big of a problem for you all? I guess it would be a real beech if they did fail but these Western Digital's seem to last forever.

I wouldn't call raid a "backup solution." More like, a downtime prevention mechanism. If you are relying on raid for your backup schemes, then your data must not be worth that much to you.

Kushan said,

Yeah, I too have never had a disk failure that's resulted in the loss of unrecoverable data. But really, if you have a 1TB drive, how much of that data is actually really valuable to you?

Really, all you need to backup are your documents, your work and I suppose your game saves. 99% of people wont require more than 25Gb of space for all that, with only really the video editing people requiring so much.

I disagree, cause i got 850GB total hdd space (3 hdd's, 250GB - 200GB - 400GB) and even though it aint full, it's getting somewhat close and ill admit there is a moderate amount i could delete if i had to but i would say at least half of what i got on there now (or more) i would want to keep there... mainly speaking about XviD movies primarily.... and im sure theres LOTS of people like me in this sence so that "99percent" comment i dont think is true.

warwagon said,
Bigger hard drives are great and everything, but you need large media to back the stuff that you put on them.

Like a similar hard drive?

CD/DVDs/even HD/BluRay discs have never kept up with hard drive capacity, so what I've been doing for a long time now is leave my old hard drives in my older systems, and use them to backup the important stuff on my primary PC. A weekly batch file invoking xcopy with the proper flags works fine, robocopy (from the Windows 2000 resource kit) is even better to avoid copying identical files. Takes me half an hour to sync the important files on my primary PC with the backup, across a 100mbps LAN...typically much less, if only a few files have changed.

I don't like tapes because they're slow and inconvenient. Didn't mean to delete a file? A simple drag and drop across a share on my LAN will take care of that.

For bigger disaster recovery, I use Acronis once a month to backup my OS partition--I also put that file (<30GB) on my backup machine. I keep the OS and data files as part of different backup sets.

Then once every two months I'll back that up to tape, but I've yet to have a reason to use it.