New video shows Microsoft's Surface Pro 3 at work at Seattle Children's Hospital

Even though the first units of Microsoft's Surface Pro 3 won't get into the hands of regular consumers until June 20th, the company has already lined up some big businesses like Coca-Cola and BMW to purchase the 12 inch tablet. Today, Microsoft has announced that the Seattle Children's Hospital is the latest large organization that has committed to using the Surface Pro 3.

In both a new blog post and in a YouTube video, Microsoft goes over how the Surface Pro 3 is attracting more business and enterprise users. In the case of the Seattle Children's Hospital, the video shows employees stating that it was a "no brainer" to pick Microsoft's tablet as their laptop replacement. The video shows how the Surface Pro 3 could be used to show more medical data at once to doctors using its larger 12 inch screen. Using the tablet with the optional Surface Pen also allows physicians to take written notes quickly.

The blog post also has a quick Q&A with Jim Scholefield, the Chief Technology Officer, for Coca-Cola. When asked why he picked the Surface Pro 3 for the company to use at this early stage, Scholefield said, "With personal productivity platforms converging between PC’s and tablets we want to be able to leverage new form factors to enable our workforce to use devices that are highly mobile, easy to operate and provide the capability of a traditional PC." Hopefully this kind of attitude will spread among more businesses who want a mobile touchscreen device that can still be used as a powerful laptop.

Source: Microsoft

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23 Comments

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although they have a day of charge, roughly i can't wait for some kind of improved wireless charging environment, so when walking through a hospital/business/etc you no longer have to really worry about power. This isn't a dig at the surface as all portable devices need charging and have a battery, it was just seeing the video with the staff walk around, you can't help think "hurry up wireless charging"

REM2000 said,
although they have a day of charge, roughly i can't wait for some kind of improved wireless charging environment, so when walking through a hospital/business/etc you no longer have to really worry about power.

For now docking station would suffice. It might be implemented on SP4 if majority of the people wants it.

TsarNikky said,
Undoubtedly, it is a nice supplement to using laptops/desktops. It does have its niche uses. A viable replacement? Hardly.

I think it depends on who's desktop/laptop it's replacing. I am an IT manager, I although I have a full desktop on my desk, there is no doubt in my mind that I could do the same thing that I do on my desktop with a Surface. As a matter of fact, 80 percent of our engineers have already replaced their laptops with Surface Pro 2s.

That was a very powerful infomercial/commercial.

It may not be a viable replacement for you, but for increasingly many it is. Hopefully, Surface Pro 4 and 5 can continue going beyond that.

Quikboy said,
It may not be a viable replacement for you, but for increasingly many it is. Hopefully, Surface Pro 4 and 5 can continue going beyond that.

Funny you should say that, because in my office it actually is viable for as you put it "Increasingly many". I'm using an increased number of engineers in our office switching up at an increasing rate. I'm using them as real world proof. Where does you "increasingly many" come from? People that aren't going to buy it anyway complaining on the internet?

TCLN Ryster said,
They appear to have a rather meaty server room for just a hospital, I wouldn't have expected that.

Yeah man, some of the larger hospital has huge server rooms. There is a huge amount of data being generated by hospitals on a daily basis, and by law they have to maintain medical history for about 7 years (I think that's the federal standard).

Wondering if surface pro 3 can get virus... is this version of windows vulnerable to Virus? so an antivirus is mandatory?

acido00 said,
Wondering if surface pro 3 can get virus... is this version of windows vulnerable to Virus? so an antivirus is mandatory?

Any operating system can get malware, without exception. But yes, it runs Windows just like the desktops, you can still mess up and get something naughty.

acido00 said,
Wondering if surface pro 3 can get virus... is this version of windows vulnerable to Virus? so an antivirus is mandatory?

It runs full windows 8.1. Whatever virus can run on other windows pc can run on the surface pro 3.

Windows 8.x has anti-virus/anti-malware built in ("Windows Defender"), so an extra 3rd party anti-virus package isn't required like it was with all previous version of Windows.

link6155 said,

It runs full windows 8.1. Whatever virus can run on other windows pc can run on the surface pro 3.


viruses use exploits that usually patched with updates or stop working on new versions of windows, so your statement is inaccurate. Windows 8.1 also comes with solid built-in anti-virus and is very secure. You have to try to really mess up the system.

acido00 said,
Wondering if surface pro 3 can get virus... is this version of windows vulnerable to Virus? so an antivirus is mandatory?

Its full windows so its no different from an os perspective than any of the other choices these people have. You cant run full software on an arm tablet.

x.iso said,

viruses use exploits that usually patched with updates or stop working on new versions of windows, so your statement is inaccurate. Windows 8.1 also comes with solid built-in anti-virus and is very secure. You have to try to really mess up the system.
Not all malicious applications uses exploits. For example, many scamware are just simple registry hacks. A virus on a computer could be anything with a malicious intent, from keylogging to a mere prank even. While windows 8 does come with an anti-virus, that doesn't mean it's completely safe from viruses at all.

link6155 said,
Not all malicious applications uses exploits. For example, many scamware are just simple registry hacks. A virus on a computer could be anything with a malicious intent, from keylogging to a mere prank even. While windows 8 does come with an anti-virus, that doesn't mean it's completely safe from viruses at all.

Even for virus to be able to modify registry there are obviously protection layers in place, so it has to use exploits or social engineering to make people press ok when windows promts for changes to apply.

I guess the connection between what you said (20% increase) and the single time price of a device (guess what, if it was not this device it would be the other) is somehow connected to you? If so, not much I can say.

elenarie said,
Not bad. The guy didn't sound much convincing, though.

He couldn't be more convincing... setting examples, giving proper reason for productivity, etc.