New Windows 8 Store screenshots emerge

Today some new screenshots have emerged that show the Windows Store that will be present and working in the Windows 8 Consumer Preview. The screenshots allegedly come from Windows 8 build 8250, which has previously been rumoured to be the very same build that will be used for the Consumer Preview.

The screenshots come from PCBeta (if you couldn’t already tell from the enormous watermarks) and show not only the layout of apps in the store, but also some of the apps that will be available, the app information page and the update system. Below are the screenshots, and we have tried our best to translate the Chinese.

The above image shows the Windows Store home screen. Note the inclusion of “Xbox LIVE Games” which would suggest that Xbox LIVE gaming is coming to Windows 8 in the same way that it is supported on Windows Phone 7. Title reads “Application Store” with a subheading of “Spotlight”; the heading to the right reads “Games” with genre tiles below.

Here is the Windows Store games (the title reads “Games”) section, with just a small amount of games showing such as Cut The Rope.

Next we have the app installation screen, which looks very similar to the way the Windows Phone Marketplace updates apps. The small text 主页 to the bottom of the title in every screenshot translates to “Home”.

It isn’t entirely clear what this screenshot is showing but it could possibly be a screen that shows applications from a certain category.

The above image shows the app information page for the new SkyDrive app. The left hand side shows the icon, rating and price along with an installation button and the right side has the screenshots and information. Above the images read the tabs “Outline”, “Detailed Information” and “Comments”.

These Windows Store screenshots should tide us over until we get to actually play with it when the Consumer Preview lands on Wednesday February 29 after a press event at MWC in Barcelona.

Thanks to FaiKee for the tip via the forums!

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What possibly ordinary user could find in Windows Store? PC is not a giant smart phone, it almost comes down to the fact that ordinary user has same app on his phone really not needed for desktop.

PC Application base is so big that Windows Store is pretty useless. Like i want to try some free app written by Joe Doe to **** through my Windows Registry. Thanks, No. This is not gonna work for PC. For example if i need 7zip to download i will go to

http://www.7-zip.org/ and get it from there. PC itself is huge entertainment box with limitless posibilities that one Windows Store is not needed to make your experience richer.

Edited by techguy77, Feb 22 2012, 7:32pm :

App stores are not aimed at power users who already know where to go for trustworthy software; they are aimed at everyday users who need a safe and convenient way of getting the apps they want in a couple of clicks.

As for your registry concern that's a non-issue because all Metro style apps are sandboxed. They cannot touch the registry, and access to user data types and hardware features must be specifically requested by the app (as on mobile platforms). Anything the app doesn't specifically ask for access to is completely invisible to it. This is inherently more secure than the old model where a program could request overall administrator access and then do whatever it wanted.

g0dlike said,
Windows 3.1, here we go again.

I don't understand these comments. This looks nothing like Windows 3.1. I'm not saying it looks good, but comparing it to any previous version of Windows is nonsense.

I don't like the direction Microsoft is taking Metro. They really need to look back at WMC and Zune. Those were elegant, while this is boring at best, and with all the stupid bright colored boxes, ugly at worst.

My main gripe is the total lack of shading. Our eyes are used to using subtle shading cues to help guide them. Here's a quick mockup I did that shows how a little shading can go a long way to making something look much, much better: http://t.co/QsBAX4d7

translation:

pic #
1. appstore
got a brand new PC but don't know where to start?
install these must-have apps
to the right: action, adventure, arcade

2. Games, 7 apps

3. installing

4. got a brand new PC but don't----------4 apps
main page
windows store provides/offers
quick, use these apps to fill up your start screen! these apps are for everyone, with some of them that will improve the way you play or work.

5. main page > productivity
summary, details, feedback

2 votes
free
install
when you install, you agree to the terms of use
this apps is allowed to use:
your internet connection

If these are real, I do hope that isn't a merging of Mail, Calendar, People (and whatever else) into one "application," like Windows Live Essentials has always been. I would prefer them to be separate applications, like Microsoft Skydrive appears to be.

This screenshot appears to confirm rumours that Windows Live Skydrive will now just be named Microsoft Skydrive, and I do hope that removal of the Windows Live brand is reflected in the naming of Mail, Calendar, People, the photo-related app, and Messenger.

I haven't ever liked the grouping of calendar apps with mail apps

Callum said,
If these are real, I do hope that isn't a merging of Mail, Calendar, People (and whatever else) into one "application," like Windows Live Essentials has always been. I would prefer them to be separate applications, like Microsoft Skydrive appears to be.

This screenshot appears to confirm rumours that Windows Live Skydrive will now just be named Microsoft Skydrive, and I do hope that removal of the Windows Live brand is reflected in the naming of Mail, Calendar, People, the photo-related app, and Messenger.

I haven't ever liked the grouping of calendar apps with mail apps


The Windows Live Essentials installer lets you pick what apps you want. I have photo gallery and movie maker but don't have anything else on my laptop.

This may just mean that the new Essentials equivalent is listed as a single app on the store but then unpacks into multiple apps, each with its own tile. Having a single app do multiple unrelated tasks would contradict Metro's task-centric goals.

stevehoot said,

The Windows Live Essentials installer lets you pick what apps you want. I have photo gallery and movie maker but don't have anything else on my laptop.

I understand that, but they're still bundled together in that package, and I don't like the idea of each app being given that lower level of 'importance'. I believe every app should have a different entry in the Window Store and be a different download. Further, currently, email, calendar, and RSS feeds are included within the same app (Windows Live Mail)

To anyone reading this, I'm not assuming anything here; I'm just stating what I'd like to see based on what we currently have with Windows Live Essentials

Arkose said,
This may just mean that the new Essentials equivalent is listed as a single app on the store but then unpacks into multiple apps, each with its own tile. Having a single app do multiple unrelated tasks would contradict Metro's task-centric goals.

I think that does appear to be the case. I would rather each of those apps be given the same status as other apps, though, by having their own place in the Windows Store. Luckily, as you suggest, it appears as if Mail and Calendar will at least finally be separate.

dont like it.. cant even read it and who thought it would be a good idea to have a big black bar across it.................. ......... /s

Jose_49 said,
What I love of all of this is the word "Free" on some of this pictures

That's what I thought! Compared to the AppStore from Apple where most stuff is $0.99.

I have a suspicion that Windows 8 retail will be drastically cheaper than previous versions - I suspect that Microsoft hopes that it can get far more revenue this way by driving app purchases (it certainly works for Apple). That would fit with their bold claims about how many devices will be available for developers to target. The last thing Microsoft wants is to price out too many users and stall the store. I don't think it will be OS X cheap, that's probably too much of a psychological price cut - it makes sense for OS X since people feel they're getting a premium product cos of the Mac itself - let's say £50 for Windows 8 at retail.

The other neat thing to do would be to unify the editions, baking some of the enterprise stuff in like domain join (for simplicity) and putting other features as free or paid for downloads in the store. With some enterprise purchase scheme for buying them in bulk.

singularity87 said,
I have a suspicion that Windows 8 retail will be drastically cheaper than previous versions - I suspect that Microsoft hopes that it can get far more revenue this way by driving app purchases (it certainly works for Apple). That would fit with their bold claims about how many devices will be available for developers to target. The last thing Microsoft wants is to price out too many users and stall the store. I don't think it will be OS X cheap, that's probably too much of a psychological price cut - it makes sense for OS X since people feel they're getting a premium product cos of the Mac itself - let's say £50 for Windows 8 at retail.

The other neat thing to do would be to unify the editions, baking some of the enterprise stuff in like domain join (for simplicity) and putting other features as free or paid for downloads in the store. With some enterprise purchase scheme for buying them in bulk.

except microsoft only gets profits from metro apps, 99% of which will be sold on tablets, where a windows cd is useless. As far as i know, they don't get profits from the desktop store as they're not actually hosting the apps on their servers.

TrOjAn. said,
Looks a bit like the chrome web store.

Really, The chrome store looks nice compared to this! Those screenshots look so awful and boring! Still hate Metro!

TrOjAn. said,
Looks a bit like the chrome web store.

What? Are you kidding? If you missed the Google copied the style Metro. The store Chrome was totally different before Microsoft launched Metro.

TrOjAn. said,
Looks a bit like the chrome web store.

it lookst exactly like the zune marketplace, and it looks a bit like chrome market cause Google copied it just done a bad job as always when it comes to designing

mjedi7 said,

Really, The chrome store looks nice compared to this! Those screenshots look so awful and boring! Still hate Metro!

You hate chinese because you can't read the text, not metro.

The OS better be cheap. I'm not buying the OS for $350 and then those pieces of software that should be part of the OS from the get go.

ozgeek said,
The OS better be cheap. I'm not buying the OS for $350 and then those pieces of software that should be part of the OS from the get go.

what are you talking about?
all the apps (features) windows had until now (like media player etc.) will still be included and WIndows Store won't be just for Microsoft apps you know...

legally they can not have the software pre-installed, that's why its FREE to download yourself.
Also never pay full retail price for windows, so many ways to get it cheap and sometimes free (legally)

ozgeek said,
The OS better be cheap. I'm not buying the OS for $350 and then those pieces of software that should be part of the OS from the get go.

Windows has never been $350. Even the most expensive Ultimate edition with no upgrade discount was $319 for Windows 7. The "normal" edition of the OS would be Home Premium, which was $199 full or $119 upgrade, and cheaper for OEMs. Methinks you're exaggerating. Anyway, given that Windows is the most mission-critical piece of software you buy for any computer, given the high level of complexity underneath and given the gargantuan numbers of man hours it takes to test, refine, develop and secure it on hundreds of millions of combinations of hardware, wouldn't you say it was worth paying a few dollars for? I would.

ozgeek said,
The OS better be cheap. I'm not buying the OS for $350 and then those pieces of software that should be part of the OS from the get go.

"those pieces of software" arent built in because of regulation issues. And they're mostly free.

dafin0 said,
legally they can not have the software pre-installed, that's why its FREE to download yourself.
Also never pay full retail price for windows, so many ways to get it cheap and sometimes free (legally)

Free... Well, i got server editions of Windows as part of DreamSpark when I was in college but other than that, I have bever heard of a free alternative for Consumer versions. Or am I missing something!!!

in Australia a lot of schools (well both schools and TAFES iv been to have) have MSDNA accounts so you can get it free there. but yeah for 'every day people' you have to pay. but even then its easy to get a OEM copy or a cheap upgrade copy

Timble said,

Windows has never been $350. Even the most expensive Ultimate edition with no upgrade discount was $319 for Windows 7. The "normal" edition of the OS would be Home Premium, which was $199 full or $119 upgrade, and cheaper for OEMs. Methinks you're exaggerating. Anyway, given that Windows is the most mission-critical piece of software you buy for any computer, given the high level of complexity underneath and given the gargantuan numbers of man hours it takes to test, refine, develop and secure it on hundreds of millions of combinations of hardware, wouldn't you say it was worth paying a few dollars for? I would.

Vista Ultimate at retail was $399 and Windows 7 Ultimate was $319. OEM copies are cheap but they are tied to one PC, you can't transfer them to another PC. Upgrade copies don't officially let you clean install. Best way is to get retail from eBay etc.

xpclient said,

Vista Ultimate at retail was $399 and Windows 7 Ultimate was $319. OEM copies are cheap but they are tied to one PC, you can't transfer them to another PC. Upgrade copies don't officially let you clean install. Best way is to get retail from eBay etc.

Upgrades do let you do a fresh install as long as you can prove to the installer you have an older version present. (e.g. media)

For £60 you can buy it OEM. So what if you can't transfer it to another PC. It's £60 man! How often do you buy a machine that doesn't come with Windows and that you want to move Windows from the old to the new one?!

ozgeek said,
The OS better be cheap. I'm not buying the OS for $350 and then those pieces of software that should be part of the OS from the get go.

hat to break it to you but you've never once payed 350 bucks for windows when you buy a new pc. more like 50.

ozgeek said,
The OS better be cheap. I'm not buying the OS for $350 and then those pieces of software that should be part of the OS from the get go.

Think of it this way: You get a cleaner, cruft-free installation that you can then shape into what you want it to be... and as another poster pointed out, most of those MS apps are free.

Morden said,
what, the store? it should have been done ages ago

For Metro apps yes, but for desktop apps, no...

Will they have desktop apps on the Win8 market place as well? I just think that might cause a lot of third-party apps to lose market share, since they'll be forced to promote on the Windows store.

Breakthrough said,

For Metro apps yes, but for desktop apps, no...

Will they have desktop apps on the Win8 market place as well? I just think that might cause a lot of third-party apps to lose market share, since they'll be forced to promote on the Windows store.

It worked out well for the developers and the mac app store as we remember. So if anything, the developers are winning. As they can sell the apps through microsoft - a trusted source (you'd hope so anyway)

Breakthrough said,

For Metro apps yes, but for desktop apps, no...

Will they have desktop apps on the Win8 market place as well? I just think that might cause a lot of third-party apps to lose market share, since they'll be forced to promote on the Windows store.


You'll only be able to buy and download metro apps through the store. Classic apps can be listed, but will just be links to the developer/publisher's own website or download service.

Breakthrough said,

For Metro apps yes, but for desktop apps, no...

Will they have desktop apps on the Win8 market place as well? I just think that might cause a lot of third-party apps to lose market share, since they'll be forced to promote on the Windows store.

You can list your desktop apps on the store as well with a download link to it since only metro apps will be on MS store servers and managed by it.

In the end desktop apps benefit from the listing just the same, people want a central place to browse for stuff not have to hunt things down all over the net.