New Windows 8 web browsing features detailed

The Windows 8 Release Preview has been out publicly for over a day now and many people are trying out the last pre-release version of Microsoft's latest OS. Obviously, a big part of Windows 8 is Internet Explorer 10 and its Metro interface version. In case you haven't downloaded the new Release Preview version yet, the latest update on the official Windows 8 developer blog offers up some more information on the web browsing experience in Windows 8.

Written by Rob Mauceri, the group program manager for Internet Explorer, the blog details quite a number of changes that have been made to IE 10 for the Release Preview. One of them is how the browser handles multi-page content. Mauceri writes:

Flip ahead enables you to navigate your favorite sites like you read a magazine by replacing the need to click on links with a more natural forward swipe gesture on touch-centric devices (and forward button with mouse). Imagine flipping through a multi-page New York Times article, through product listings on Amazon or eBay, or quickly catching up on the latest news by flipping through CNN.com, all by simply swiping forward without hunting for the "Next" link on the page.

The blog post also reveals how Windows 8 Release Preview adds support for viewing videos in full screen mode with HTML5 videos, a way to adjust the default level for zooming on web pages zoom on high resolution screens, a new network troubleshooter designed for Metro and more.

Source: Windows 8 blog site | Images via Microsoft

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

New Windows 8 drivers from NVIDIA coming next week

Next Story

Apple's nano-SIM card design approved by ETSI

28 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

Windows 8 will be the biggest desktop flop in Windows history. On tablets and phones, where it makes sense, it will succeed, though.

Mark my words.

Mortis said,
Windows 8 will be the biggest desktop flop in Windows history. On tablets and phones, where it makes sense, it will succeed, though.

It's the New Coke of operating systems.

Mortis said,
Windows 8 will be the biggest desktop flop in Windows history. On tablets and phones, where it makes sense, it will succeed, though.

Mark my words.

while I agree on a certain level, i doubt it will bomb as much as Windows Me did..................

Mortis said,
Windows 8 will be the biggest desktop flop in Windows history. On tablets and phones, where it makes sense, it will succeed, though.

Mark my words.


There will quickly come small apps and hacks removing the start screen and giving back the menu etc.
So I doubt that it will fail, since it should be faster than 7 right?

I tried out the metro version of IE10 yesterday. I can see it working well on a tablet but using a browser like this on a desktop with a mouse and keyboard is just frustrating. There are no controls at all unless you hover in certain corners or edges then they pop into view covering up part of your page. So annoying.

I hate it that every time you click on a link the bottom address bar and buttons shows up and doesn't go away until the you click somewhere inside the newly loaded page.
The thing is really annoying.

Also, it appears that if you click on a link that is already loaded in a "tab" or however those squared boxes that appear at the top are called, it shows the top "tabs bar", I guess to inform you that you are "switching" tabs. Useless and distracting.

So in the end you are constantly seeing stuff appear from the top and the bottom, sweeping in and out.

What a load of ...!

Mike Frett said,
Yet another reason to let Windows 8 die already.

Why exactly? I've been using it for two days and find it much more intuitive and enjoyable to use.

ccoltmanm said,

Why exactly? I've been using it for two days and find it much more intuitive and enjoyable to use.


Than what? Than Windows 7? Oh, please...

Mortis said,

Than what? Than Windows 7? Oh, please...

Yep, and on the desktop, Windows 8 works Exactly the same as Windows 7, with one exception, there isn't a start menu. The replacement of that start menu in Windows 8 works much better and quicker then the old start menu.

sjaak327 said,

Yep, and on the desktop, Windows 8 works Exactly the same as Windows 7, with one exception, there isn't a start menu. The replacement of that start menu in Windows 8 works much better and quicker then the old start menu.

Wow my experience was totally different. I downloaded the consumer preview and tried that out when it first booted up it took me into the windows store (which wasn't working) and I couldn't figure out how to exit it as there was no tutorial as the first thing I saw was just that app full screen.

Eventually I figured out how to get out of that annoying app then I was moving around the system and honestly it felt horrible on my desktop.

On a tablet I could see its practical use but on a desktop no way in hell! I don't understand how people are praising this OS its not that its really hard to use its just unnecessarily hard to use. Doing simple things shouldn't go against my natural will the OS should be aiding what I want to do.

I love Microsoft but I really don't have a good feeling about Windows 8

i really wish that IE metro had better favorites/bookmark support. my mother has maybe a 100 favorites saved right now and pinning that many sites just doesn't work out well. then again it looks like metro firefox will have better support so that is always a option to fall back on.

dafin0 said,
i really wish that IE metro had better favorites/bookmark support. my mother has maybe a 100 favorites saved right now and pinning that many sites just doesn't work out well. then again it looks like metro firefox will have better support so that is always a option to fall back on.

You don't have to pin them all to the start screen, you can just start typing in the address bar and all your favorites show up on screen iirc. I agree that there should be a better way to bring them up though, but for now that's what I remember.

GP007 said,

you can just start typing in the address bar and all your favorites show up on screen iirc. I

Yes, because TYPING is the core strength of any touch device...or ANY GUI design paradigm for that matter. 8P

excalpius said,

Yes, because TYPING is the core strength of any touch device...or ANY GUI design paradigm for that matter. 8P

I'm not saying it's the best way to do it, no need to single out one part of my statement to make it sound like I'm saying something else. I just pointed out how it works right now. I know you read the rest of what I said about agreeing that they should have a button for it as well.

Is the address bar always on the bottom of the page like that, or has that person's setup been customised?

Javik said,
Is the address bar always on the bottom of the page like that, or has that person's setup been customised?

Always at the bottom.

Xerax said,

Always at the bottom.

And can that be changed? (sorry if these seem like dumb questions, haven't installed the RP yet)

Javik said,

And can that be changed? (sorry if these seem like dumb questions, haven't installed the RP yet)


It's on the bottom because at the top you will get little screenshots of each tab and the ability to open a new tab and a little menu.
I think it would have been just fine to keep the address bar at the top and put the webpage previews at the bottom, but it's ok.

ghos said,

It's on the bottom because at the top you will get little screenshots of each tab and the ability to open a new tab and a little menu.
I think it would have been just fine to keep the address bar at the top and put the webpage previews at the bottom, but it's ok.

More specifically, its at the bottom because when you hold your tablet, this is where its easiest to "swipe & type", so to speak. Otherwise you have to move your hand off the tablet, to hit the address bar, then go back down to use the keyboard.

butilikethecookie said,

No.

Microsoft has taken a page from Apple with Metro...not realizing that the freedom to use your computer your way is one of the main reasons why OS X lost the desktop operating system war to Windows.

excalpius said,

Microsoft has taken a page from Apple with Metro...not realizing that the freedom to use your computer your way is one of the main reasons why OS X lost the desktop operating system war to Windows.

So, let me just toss this one out there, can you move the UI of any desktop apps you may use to any place you want in the window? Honestly you're mistaking "freedom to use your computer" which you still have, with the inability to just change the UI for apps how you see fit. We're talking about two different issues here.

If for some reason the metro version of IE isn't good for you then at some point in the future you'll be able to use either firefox or chrome instead, each with their own UI which I bet you won't be able to change either.

excalpius said,

Microsoft has taken a page from Apple with Metro...not realizing that the freedom to use your computer your way is one of the main reasons why OS X lost the desktop operating system war to Windows.


The vast majority of people couldn't care less about customizability, they just want somethings that works. Next to that OS X didn't loose anything since it's still around and Mac sales have never been higher. People like yourself don't seem to realize that you don't need the biggest marketshare in order to have a successful product.

.Neo said,

People like yourself don't seem to realize that you don't need the biggest marketshare in order to have a successful product.

I never said anything of the kind. What I said was that one of the reasons Windows is still used 20 to 1 over OS X in homes and businesses is that all versions of Windows (up until Windows 8) have included multiple ways to use the operating system to accomplish any given task. Whereas Apple prefers the "my way or the highway" approach to GUI design that MS is adopting here with Windows 8.

I think this is a terrible mistake by MS with regards to their legacy users on the desktop, which represents their best in class core competency with Windows 7.

PS it's "something" and "lose".

excalpius said,

I never said anything of the kind. What I said was that one of the reasons Windows is still used 20 to 1 over OS X in homes and businesses is that all versions of Windows (up until Windows 8) have included multiple ways to use the operating system to accomplish any given task. Whereas Apple prefers the "my way or the highway" approach to GUI design that MS is adopting here with Windows 8.

So, what tablet-friendly version of IE from the past were you able to customize to the level you are speaking of? If you don't like the lack of customization in Metro apps, then simply don't use Metro apps. Use the normal apps which are, for the most part, still the same.