New Windows Division head discusses why Windows interface was overhauled, more


Julie Larson-Green has given one of her first major interviews after a month at the helm of the Windows Division.

It's been more than a month since Steven Sinofsky left Microsoft, and now his replacement at the top of Microsoft's Windows Division is speaking out in one of her first major interviews.

Julie Larson-Green, the woman who is now in charge of Windows, spoke with MIT Technology Review on a wide range of topics in a new interview. Among the topics discussed were Sinofsky's departure and why Microsoft decided to overhaul its tradition interface with Windows 8.

On the latter topic, Larson-Green said the new interface is a product of a changing environment. The traditional Windows interface has been largely static for the past 25 years, she said, and the new interface provides information in a quicker manner. Larson-Green specifically touted the fact that previous versions of Windows were about launching from one window to the next, whereas Windows 8 eliminates the need for opening some applications at all.

"... with Windows 8, all the different things that you might want to do are there at a glance with the Live Tiles," she said. "Instead of having to find many little rocks to look underneath, you see a kind of dashboard of everything that’s going on and everything you care about all at once. It puts you closer to what you’re trying to get done."

Larson-Green later added that touch will be a very important factor in the PC market going forward, saying she can't "imagine a computer without touch anymore" and that it'd be hard to go back to a computer that lacks touch input.

On the topic of the polarizing response to the new Windows 8 interface, Larson-Green said Microsoft is "going for the over time impression rather than the first 20 minutes out of the box." She emphasized that it would be hard for people who are very invested in "the old way" to transition to the new interface, but that in two days to two weeks people would adjust to the new interface.

To read the entire interview, click here.

Source: MIT Technology Review via The Verge | Image via Microsoft

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

IE mouse tracking claims may have had alternative motives

Next Story

Nokia Lumia "Juggernaut" photo leaked

80 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

I do not mind the replacement of Start Menu with Start Screen. However I am terribly missing the Task Bar. I heavily multitask in windows and I need to see what else is open / unning at all times without any gestures.. This entire debate about Start Screen has taken everyones eyes off the real issue - the missing Task Bar.

It's all about pushing the same UI to all devices. The ultimate goal was to up the sales of windows phone, and tablet devices. In order to get those sales up they forced the windows phone UI on their other two branches, windows desktop and xbox gaming. Also with the hope that it would help on the tablet front too.

I know that if I had three branches of a successful business I would take the look of the poorest selling one and force it onto the other two far more successful ones. That's got to be a great move.....

margrave said,
It's all about pushing the same UI to all devices. The ultimate goal was to up the sales of windows phone, and tablet devices. In order to get those sales up they forced the windows phone UI on their other two branches, windows desktop and xbox gaming. Also with the hope that it would help on the tablet front too.

I know that if I had three branches of a successful business I would take the look of the poorest selling one and force it onto the other two far more successful ones. That's got to be a great move.....

Except that Windows Phone 7 was actually based on the Windows 8 UI, not the other way around. It was released to their smallest market first as a minimal-risk test, and when it received the overwhelmingly positive reaction that it did, it was pushed to other platforms.

Apparently Ms. Larsen-Green has forgotten "Active Desktop". We all know what a great success that was.

If you ask me Windows 8 is a knee jerk reaction to the fear that M$ will become irrelevant to the touch and swipe, smart phone generation. It would have made more sense to incorporate a traditional interface as an option instead of forcing people to seek a fix or alternative. They have sort of fixed something that wasn't necessarily broken.

Mr Byte said,
Apparently Ms. Larsen-Green has forgotten "Active Desktop". We all know what a great success that was.

If you ask me Windows 8 is a knee jerk reaction to the fear that M$ will become irrelevant to the touch and swipe, smart phone generation. It would have made more sense to incorporate a traditional interface as an option instead of forcing people to seek a fix or alternative. They have sort of fixed something that wasn't necessarily broken.

Active Desktop was the precursor to Widgets/Gadgets with live internet information that is alive today on Windows 8 as Tiles are an evolution of the same 'Active/Live' information interface.

Active Desktop was underrated because people didn't understand the potential back in the 90s.

Just because you don't see the evolution or the 'vision' they have of the future, doesn't mean they are wrong. I hope you do get it or you will be lost to the previous generation of usability constraints.

(Reminds me of people hating Win95 and being angry that programs defaulted to using a Document folder or tried to move people away from a hierarchical and application based metaphor to a docu-centric model. A lot of people never did truly get why this was foist upon them, and to this day still turn Explorer into a glorified File Manager, sadly wasting their time.)

Some where along the line, I'm sure her job title is engineer and we all know their jobs are to screw stuff up!!

That desktop in Windows 8 is about as stupid as stupid can get!! I've already had to downgrade half a dozen computers to Windows 7 because those people were complaining about how dumb that crap is!! We all know also that the customer is always right, so I'll gladly take those people's money to do a downgrade!!

cork1958 said,
We all know also that the customer is always right, so I'll gladly take those people's money to do a downgrade!!

Personally, I think you're doing those people a disservice. If you took half an hour to educate those users about keyboard shortcuts, tile grouping, etc etc, then those users would be better off in the long run.

it would be hard for people who are very invested in "the old way" to transition to the new interface

Sure, circular wheels on the cars are so old school. It would be hard for people who are very invested in "the old way" to transition to the new square ones.

As I've said before, "the old way" - keyboard and mouse is ergonomically superior to touch screen and it can be proven by using science. It looks like new wave of Microsoft managers live in some delusional fantasy bubble and they never did serious work with computers. It is not very hard to see who is going to loose in Microsoft vs Reality battle.

EJocys said,

Sure, circular wheels on the cars are so old school. It would be hard for people who are very invested in "the old way" to transition to the new square ones.

As I've said before, "the old way" - keyboard and mouse is ergonomically superior to touch screen and it can be proven by using science. It looks like new wave of Microsoft managers live in some delusional fantasy bubble and they never did serious work with computers. It is not very hard to see who is going to loose in Microsoft vs Reality battle.

You realize we had this SAME set of debate in the early 90s, except then it was CLI and keyboard users proclaiming that a character based UI and a keyboard was SUPERIOR to a GUI and a mouse?

This is kind of funny that people see the mouse as superior today, when 20 years ago it was seen as a pointless device for idiots by the people then that 'did not get it'...

Welcome to the 'do not get it' crowd of 2012.

You are forgetting something. Mouse didn't replaced keyboard. Touch won't replace anything ether. Only fans who never did serious job on computers belong to 'do not get it' crowd. Crowd which can't understand why keyboards have cushioned buttons and why mouse have form as it is. Touch interface still requires hands for data input and for any sane person it must be obvious that keyboard and mouse is tailored for hands better than flat surface (for example with high sensitivity mouse I don't even have to move my hand to move cursor from one side of the screen to another, because only slight swing of the wrist is enough. My hands also laying down comfortably on the desk and my fingertips pushing soft buttons on keyboard while I am typing this text. Try doing this on high resolution large touch screen all day and I guaranty that you are going to claim "touch" workstation disability benefits pretty soon. "Touch" is only good where you can't have desks.

Windows 7 had a pointless UI re-design that put me off of using it. Even using classic shell, 7+ taskbar tweaker and modding the UI to appear like Vista, it still isn't enough to revert the awful changes they made which only decreased my efficiency and increased my frustration with using the OS.

Windows 8 I am not even going to comment on.

Chances are, I will be with Vista until a new OS comes out that is a worthy replacement if I cannot find any deeper mods that really revert the terrible changes not covered by the mods I've already found.

Come on Valve, push Linux and generate more competition in the OS market.

It seems clear that business-oriented data entry productivity was not the highest priority for Windows-8. Oh well. It is fine to pander to the fickle consumer market, but at the expense of the business community...a very risky move.

This Woman surely is stu..., I cannot imaging someone playing a FPS with a touch controller, or even worst standing up from my couch to control my HTPC. She had a lobotomy or she wants us all very very slim and fit. And what about the fingerprints in a 52" display. I cleaned once a month and I hate doing it, just think in cleaning it everyday is nightmare.
Please MS hire better personal or at least some people with full brain.

> "Instead of having to find many little rocks to look underneath, you see a kind of dashboard of everything that's going on and everything you care about all at once. It puts you closer to what you're trying to get done."

So they want to present everything as a dashboard...finally, that clarifies what it is they're trying to do.

That being said--I can see it for a tablet, but not a full-blown desktop machine.

Windows 7 had touch, I bought one of the first 23inch touch screens for Win7, the touch was not that good and the screen was not good either, but it had touch

I am using the new UI and Windows 8 for 2 month by now, and yesterday I moved back one of the computers to Windows 777777777

Yes Windows 8 and faster, and have some good features, but Windows 8 and Office 13 are damn uglyyyyyyyy, Windows 8 removed the animations and glass interface to save battery and office 13 added the animation, wow, good job.

What kind of drugs are they taking at Microsoft?

I would like to know who these people are that are getting relevant data from Live Tiles that they can simply just sit and stare at their Start Screen for extended periods of time.

Temperature, 2 new emails, calendar appointment, someone liked something on facebook that's about it. I'm I missing something or can you glean ALL the relative data from Live Tiles in less than 30 seconds? And then you are off into another app or into the desktop mode and the live tiles are hidden and pointless.

They could've in-cooperated them to show up as notification blurbs on timed or relevant changes and overlay over any app to bring their data to you. But no you have to go to it.

Using Windows 8 about 10 hours a day for months on end now I think I see the Start Screen a whole 2 minutes total in a day. I find myself thinking, "I should go and have a look at it just to see if it's doing something."

That and I am totally fine without a Start Menu. But they need to bring back a visual target of a Start Button. The hot corners are a total mess. Using them with multiple monitors, while better than other OS's is still a pain. The visually and movement impaired folks have a horrible time with them. It doesnt offer precision at the 10' range. It's just awful.

While I understand their focus on pushing forward, they've neglected some major design elements in regards to usability and function.

Well, for her the temperature and how many Facebook likes she got is a relevant data, but for the educated people like architects, programmers, designers, doctors, ….. is not

I agree with her. I think the future will be more "tablet" like computers (with touch) and less towers with monitors, that we have today.

I personally don't care of any touch interface, If you do then good for you, use it to your heart's content. You can put all the lipstick you want on Windows 8, but it is still a pig, nothing will change that.

I have complaints about Windows 8, and I know they'll be sorted out.

It is unfinished, and I still don't believe that Windows 9 will get it right.

People do not understand that a shell rewrite is very complex, and it's like doing a whole Operating System anew.

It's incredible that Windows 8 works like it does now. I want to know what will Windows 10 have to offer (yes, 10)

It's sad to see how the 'IT crowd' here on Neowin always has to think so black and white.
Why can't you see touch for what it is, an extra way of input. You all go up in arms because touch on a desktop must suck. It probably will if it's the only way of input, but MS has never said they want to get rid of kb/m. They want to give you the extra option. Is it so hard to embrace something new? In stead it seems like some of you are afraid of the future, and fight with all your might to stay in the year 2000. Good luck

To all the others welcome to a future with more methods of input

Their thinking is make everything now as simple and as minimal as possible instead of making the UI richer and configurable. Customization for them means changing color. Reverse interface strategy as Jakob Nielsen mentioned. That they say mouse *still* works. Nice insult MS but no thanks.

Makes sense, after using Surface for some time I keep in touching my old laptop. Things are faster and more accessible in Windows 8

I love Metro(or whatever it's now called) in concept, and I really have loved it in past iterations like Windows Media Center, Zune software (on both device and desktop), but I feel it needs a lot more refining on Windows 8 though I consider it a decent start.

The main issues with it being on Windows 8 so far is that: 1) most functionality is somewhat primative as there are only a few buttons for controls and doing stuff, 2) people want more customizing options to get the interface (as far as the Start screen goes) the way they want it, 3) the desktop and start screen really clash in lots of way and i feels more disjointed than unified, and 4) interface parity with Windows Phone (which most tech people are somewhat familiar with) also doesn't seem to be congruent in interface style and options sometimes as well as gesture for two products that "look" similar.

But I think it's a decent start. I hope that Windows Blue will bring much better refinement that the interface could really use. Windows 9 will likely be a much more evolved form of Windows 8, just as Windows 7 was to Vista, and Windows 8 is the bridge OS to get things off the ground. I still think Microsoft should have kept Aero and the Start menu at least as secondary options at least for this OS, because people have been used to it, like the look, and it's familiar with them. It's a transition period Microsoft, and the interface still needs refining b/c it still feels undone. At Windows 9 is hopefully a point where most people will have no qualms to using a Start Screen and Metro style look.

That being said, I hope I'll be able to get a Surface Pro next year

Godness... this is madness. I just want to have the option of having the start menu back, she can keep her interface but allow me to do what I want.

"She can't "imagine a computer without touch anymore""

That right there is the problem

Remember how everyone says the Modern UI isn't designed for touch first, mouse second on the desktop!?

She pretty much just said she wants all computers to be touch based. Even desktop ones. I think she wants to see the death of the mouse and keyboard. I think she needs to leave Microsoft ASAP. Things might only get worse.

Edited by warwagon, Dec 14 2012, 3:40pm :

dtboos said,
Touch and gesture is the future of technology. Anybody who doesn't believe or see that has blinders on.

How about NO.

I don't want to control my computer by reaching across the desk and touching a 30" monitor.

warwagon said,
"She can't "imagine a computer without touch anymore""

That right there is the problem

Remember how everyone says the Modern UI isn't designed for touch first, mouse second on the desktop!?

She pretty much just said she wants all computers to be touch based. Even desktop ones. I think she wants to see the death of the mouse and keyboard. I think she needs to leave Microsoft ASAP. Things might only get worse.

The mouse was a laughing stock when it was first introduced. People simply didn't see the need for it, nor could they even understand how to use it, with some picking it up and holding it on the screen. How times have changed and people (and technology) have moved on.

As someone who trialed a touch screen in a work environment, NO.

Biggest issue is that my monitor (and mostly everyone else here for that matter) is out of reach.

I had to move the monitor closer to me, which cluttered my work desk. I then developed shoulder issues (think carpal of the shoulder according to the doctor). I moved the monitor even closer, and then my eyes started to bother me. Trip to the doctor resulted in daily saline drops because I was looking at a monitor that was too close to me straining my eyes in a manner that was drying them out.

warwagon said,
On tablets sure, laptops maybe, but I do not want to be touching my desktop monitor.

Then don't. The mouse and keyboard still works, they added a third way. When even the Verge has an article saying - Yep, we thought it would suck touching your monitor, but it actually works and Microsoft was right - then maybe it does work.

dtboos said,
Touch and gesture is the future of technology. Anybody who doesn't believe or see that has blinders on.

Not sure who is the one who has blinders on. Controlling your PC with touch is only useful for casual computing and content consumption. Any serious PC worker (architect, engineer, scientist, software developer, web/graphics designer, CAD architect/designer, etc, etc, etc, etc) does not need/want touch. I will look like a complete idiot if I was sitting here swiping around my three 24"+ monitors although it sounds like it could be quite the workout.

Nothing against women in tech but this one needs to resign yesterday and pass the torch to someone that doesn't care about colorful unicorns (which is what I expect to see every time I see a Win8 start screen; thank god for Start8 so I don't have to even look at that toys-r-us interface)

Just because an input method exists does not mean you are required to use it. However, at some point, sticking a touchscreen into a device will be cheap enough that NOT including it will be more expensive due to needing to keep separate manufacturing lines and SKUs.

Also, there are simply a few actions that make a lot more sense with touch, even on a desktop.

And man, the resistance to touch is kind of amazing. Do people not remember when the iPhone was first unveiled and people thought a touchscreen keyboard was the most idiotic thing ever (especially Blackberry users)? And now, making a phone without a touchscreen keyboard makes practically no sense in this day and age.

The solution that my co-worker and myself came to regarding touch screen monitor in a desktop environment in a workplace will require a total revamp of the monitor/keyboard/mouse layout.

I think a keyboard either attached or loosely attached to a monitor that lies on the desk with the monitor tilted up at an angle (perhaps 20 to 30 degrees) with perhaps a mouse off to the side is probably the ideal setup.

Of course in some regards, this pretty much resembles a Surface tablet with the keyboard. I think for touch to take off on desktops (custom rigs, gaming rigs, PCs needed for apps that can't run on Surface Pro), this setup should be copied.

nohone said,
Then don't. The mouse and keyboard still works, they added a third way. When even the Verge has an article saying - Yep, we thought it would suck touching your monitor, but it actually works and Microsoft was right - then maybe it does work.

Ah yes, the excitement of it being a novelty - just you wait a few months and it'll become about as useful to the average user as the thunderbolt port on the back of an iMac.

I guess you haven't seen the larger touchpads to be used instead of touching the screen itself. It is an alternative could prove better than a mouse in some cases.

warwagon said,
"She can't "imagine a computer without touch anymore""

warwagon, respectfully, read the full interview and you'll see she was responding to a question about PCs having touchscreens, not a question about Windows 8 & metro.

sagum said,

The mouse was a laughing stock when it was first introduced. People simply didn't see the need for it, nor could they even understand how to use it, with some picking it up and holding it on the screen. How times have changed and people (and technology) have moved on.

Of course it was a laughing stock. The first mouse was badly designed and not supported. But nobody actually used that. Not anyone i know anyway.

But here we are talking about the 2nd coming of Jesus. Metro UI. The perfect creation. The messiah.

I can tell you as someone who played Doom with a keyboard extensively and used dos for many years on a 386 as far as i can remember the first time i used a mouse i tought it was the best thing since sliced bread.

Edited by LaP, Dec 14 2012, 4:35pm :

Obry said,

Nothing against women in tech but this one needs to resign yesterday and pass the torch to someone that doesn't care about colorful unicorns (which is what I expect to see every time I see a Win8 start screen; thank god for Start8 so I don't have to even look at that toys-r-us interface)

Strange you should say that about the toys-r-us interface. When Windows XP was released, I remember a lot of backlash over the new themes, with people citing it as the Fisher Price OS, yet it became one of Microsoft's most popular OS to date.
Going back, people raged so hard about windows 95 when they got rid of the program manager and introduced the start menu. People were sure at the time that it'd be the death of Windows and they'd all be moving back to Mac OS (and that was way before OS X was released, think more like System 7).

While I still have a few issues with the start screen, I don't mind the lack of the start menu anymore, but I've always been something of a power user preferring keyboard navigation rather then mouse for the most part anyway, but I don't think I could go back to using the start menu now, it'd feel quite limited.

One of the things that does annoy me most of all is the quick switch in the top left. I've always used the top left system menu in an application for double click to close so pushing my mouse into that corner for a quick way to close an application is now quite slow as I have to ensure I don't accidently move too far into the corner and bring up the switch box. It's issues like these, rather then the lack of start menu that annoys me most about Windows 8.

TheLegendOfMart said,

How about NO.

I don't want to control my computer by reaching across the desk and touching a 30" monitor.


You will on the right porn sites...

GS:mac

Obry said,

I will look like a complete idiot if I was sitting here swiping around my three 24"+ monitors although it sounds like it could be quite the workout.

Funny you should say that - I know a great many people with PC's and not one of them uses a multi-monitor setup (I mean what's the point? Just Alt-Tab if you want to see something else). Maybe that's not the way forward (well it certainly isn't the most popular way to work) so MS should not include it from now on.....


...Of course they could just leave it in for the people who do use it, y'know - kinda like the touch stuff

Windows 7 had touch, no one care about the touch, the problem is forcing developers to build only for touch, which is damn stupidity. Try to publish something on their store that does not support touch and works in desktop mode.

Pygmy_Hippo said,

Funny you should say that - I know a great many people with PC's and not one of them uses a multi-monitor setup (I mean what's the point? Just Alt-Tab if you want to see something else).

Once you go multi monitor you never go back.

I think MS needs to keep an open mind. Touch is great but comfort is even better. When it comes to full system control (right down to the minor details), the desktop is better than any current touch interface.

Im not stuck in my ways, I have happily moved from previous versions of Windows because the interface and control was better, but this time something is wrong. MS needs to remember that the mouse and keyboard provide a brilliant and detailed interface.

Touch is great for the quick stuff but it doesn't work (yet) for the detail. Maybe there is something else coming, but right now the touch interface priority results in an OS that is not as powerful as its predecessor (without customisation and contect for time periods) and thats an issue that should keep Windows Staff awake at night.

warwagon said,
"She can't "imagine a computer without touch anymore""

That right there is the problem

Remember how everyone says the Modern UI isn't designed for touch first, mouse second on the desktop!?

She pretty much just said she wants all computers to be touch based. Even desktop ones. I think she wants to see the death of the mouse and keyboard. I think she needs to leave Microsoft ASAP. Things might only get worse.

Touch will be augmenting, not replacing.

warwagon said,

Once you go multi monitor you never go back.


Same can be said about big monitors and high resolutions.

I'm rocking a 27" screen and not able to ever go for less anymore.
The added level of oversight and the added possibilities, let alone better photo editing, is unheard of.

GS:mac

Glassed Silver said,

Same can be said about big monitors and high resolutions.

I'm rocking a 27" screen and not able to ever go for less anymore.
The added level of oversight and the added possibilities, let alone better photo editing, is unheard of.

GS:mac

For Xmas I ordered myself a dell 30 inch IPS display. Plus its deductable.
Going to arrive monday

Edited by warwagon, Dec 15 2012, 1:28am :

warwagon said,

For Xmas I ordered myself a dell 30 inch IPS display. Plus its deductable.
Going to arrive monday


Dell IPS displays are a great choice.

Grats on the purchase, you'll love it I bet!

GS:mac

On the topic of the polarizing response to the new Windows 8 interface, Larson-Green said Microsoft is "going for the over time impression rather than the first 20 minutes out of the box." She emphasized that it would be hard for people who are very invested in "the old way" to transition to the new interface, but that in two days to two weeks people would adjust to the new interface.

This as nothing to do with the old way and bla bla bla. The new interface works very well for touchscreen tablets. I used the Asus Vivo Tab RT and it works very well. But to work the desktop remains better.

I must agree that I somewhat miss the Start menu button, but I bypassed the problem by pinning my most used applications in the taskbar instead.

Personally i dont miss the start menu at all. I would just like to have the ability to stay in desktop mode always. And i don't understand why we don't have this option for desktop. Cause i have to disagree with her. Touchscreen is not the future of desktop. Not even close to it. Why not give us the ability to run metro app and panel encapsulated in a windows and boot directly to the desktop and stay there always even when running metro app ???

Breach said,
I'm surprised that they didn't ask her about the start button in the desktop experience ;-)

No need to read the "people didn't use it" joke again.

GS:ios

Let's see a video of her doing actual WORK with a large monitor on her desk using exclusively touch for more than a few minutes.

It seems to be the only way this technological retard is ever going to figure out what the hell everyone is complaining about.

W8 is fine for portable devices and phones, but Microsoft's 95% market share end-users work (and even play) on desks with monitors far beyond arm's reach. Touch is useless to them, and therefore W8 makes using their computers LESS intuitive in every way.

If they don't fix this with Windows Blue, she should be the next to go.

Let's see a video of her doing actual WORK with a large monitor on her desk using exclusively touch for more than a few minutes.

Since the majority of work on a computer would involve typing, and since she was explicitly talking about touchscreen LAPTOPS, I'm not exactly sure if you're being serious or not. On the other hand, Windows 8 works fine with a mouse, and since 98% of desktops don't even have touchscreens, I don't know why you're even bring this into the conversation.

Perhaps you should do something about that log in your eye, it's really messing with you.

excalpius said,
If they don't fix this with Windows Blue, she should be the next to go.

There is already a fix, it's called Windows 7.

Captain555 said,

There is already a fix, it's called Windows 7.


Wrong, an older version of something is never a fix.

If you follow that philosophy, some folks would still be stuck on XP... Oh wait... -.-

Glassed Silver:mac

Glassed Silver said,

Wrong, an older version of something is never a fix.

If you follow that philosophy, some folks would still be stuck on XP... Oh wait... -.-

Glassed Silver:mac


I disagree with this to a point. So since I'm a programmer if I release a crappy bugged version of my program people are supposed to stick with it as opposed to backtracking just because it's new? That is flawed. I can think of many different examples of why an older version of different things not limited to just computers would've been a good thing.

sathenzar said,

I disagree with this to a point. So since I'm a programmer if I release a crappy bugged version of my program people are supposed to stick with it as opposed to backtracking just because it's new? That is flawed. I can think of many different examples of why an older version of different things not limited to just computers would've been a good thing.

Well, for temporary fixing, yes, that's the sensible route, however Windows 7 will not be the foundation Microsoft will proceed from on in future.
So it's a dead end.

It's a pure "enjoy it while it lasts".
(updates, new software being compatible, hardware being compatible, it being fast enough, getting new technologies)

Your analogy raises a good point, however it's not directly related.

GS:mac

Glassed Silver said,

Well, for temporary fixing, yes, that's the sensible route, however Windows 7 will not be the foundation Microsoft will proceed from on in future.
So it's a dead end.

It's a pure "enjoy it while it lasts".
(updates, new software being compatible, hardware being compatible, it being fast enough, getting new technologies)

Your analogy raises a good point, however it's not directly related.

GS:mac


Well I respect your opinion. Thank you for respecting my thoughts as well +1 for you

sathenzar said,

Well I respect your opinion. Thank you for respecting my thoughts as well +1 for you

Haha, no problem.
I try to keep my cool and stay positive and happy.

On some days I'm really in a very bad mood and not particularly good at controlling myself.
Obviously today seems to be a rather good day.

GS:mac