New York police department is testing Google Glass

The New York Police Department is reported to be testing Google Glass in order to realize the potential of using wearable computers in the role of law enforcement. The department is understood to be interested in using Glass primarily because of its built-in camera which could be used to record live video of incidents or to gather evidence for cases.

They are also interested in a new app that entered beta testing for Google Glass earlier this week. Called NameTag, it can photograph a person and then attempt to automatically identify them by scouring photos on popular social networks and attempting to find a match for the suspect. If Glass was adopted by the police then they would likely set up a similar app allowing officers to search databases for known offenders whilst still on the beat.

Google confirmed that they are not working with the New York City law enforcement team and that the NYPD just registered itself on the beta testing program for the product, called Glass Explorer, at a cost of $1,500 per customer. An official from the NYPD said in a statement given to the news website VentureBeat: 'We signed up, got a few pairs of the Google glasses, and we're trying them out, seeing if they have any values in investigations, mostly for patrol purposes. We're looking at them, you know, seeing how they work.'

Widespread adoption of Glass by police forces would be a costly process, however, with the NYPD alone employing 34,500 staff and whereas it is unlikely that we will be seeing bobbies on the street wearing the headsets any time soon, who knows what the future holds for Glass and law enforcement?

Source: The Daily Telegraph | Image via TechRadar

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13 Comments

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Seen enough cops who are a******s, not a stretch for them to be gla******s as well.

So does this mean they will not be able to arrest civilians who're wearing these things?

Actually, this is more about Accountability then it is "Spying on the Public". If EVERY interaction an officer has is recorded for posterity, then officers can't LIE about what they said, did, or saw.

Much like Dash Cams brought about a level of accountability for patrol cars.

Xionanx said,
Actually, this is more about Accountability then it is "Spying on the Public". If EVERY interaction an officer has is recorded for posterity, then officers can't LIE about what they said, did, or saw.
except that how many officers are going o wear
Much like Dash Cams brought about a level of accountability for patrol cars.

for that to work, all officer with GG would have to be prohibited from taking them off during their shift. I just can't see that happening

timster said,

for that to work, all officer with GG would have to be prohibited from taking them off during their shift. I just can't see that happening

Maybe not during their shift, but they should be prohibited from taking them off during an interaction...

Not only that, but people are less likely to be complete idiots if they know they're being filmed. I had a friend of mine tell everyone in her family that she wasn't really drunk, and that she couldn't walk the line because of her high heels. In the videotape from the car though, the officer clearly asks her to remove her high heels before walking the line... which left her red in the face.

They just wanted to see the following on their Google Glass, so they will feel like they are Robocop.

1. SERVE THE PUBLIC TRUST
2. PROTECT THE INNOCENT
3.UPHOLD THE LAW
4.[CLASSIFIED]

RommelS said,
They just wanted to see the following on their Google Glass, so they will feel like they are Robocop.

1. SERVE THE PUBLIC TRUST
2. PROTECT THE INNOCENT
3.UPHOLD THE LAW
4.[CLASSIFIED]


Apparently they have lot's of my tax monies to spare on a beta product. WTF! and even worse to spy on us. Perhaps there's a google fanboi in the police department.

nickcruz said,
Apparently they have lot's of my tax monies to spare on a beta product. WTF! and even worse to spy on us. Perhaps there's a google fanboi in the police department.

They maybe trying to see the benefit of wearing this product. It is not guarantee that they will adopt it. At $1,500 a piece is not worth it at the moment. Hopefully the price can go down as cheap as $299 a piece in the future.

nickcruz said,
Apparently they have lot's of my tax monies to spare on a beta product. WTF! and even worse to spy on us. Perhaps there's a google fanboi in the police department.

Or maybe there is no fanboy and you know, they may actually find a use for this product.

techbeck said,

Or maybe there is no fanboy and you know, they may actually find a use for this product.

except that paying 1500 dollars for a few units on an unproven device does not put my taxes to work for my benefit. I don't pay taxes for them to be doing test on unproven technology.