Nick White, Microsoft Product Manager, talks Vista SP1

Microsoft seems to want to emphasize that Windows Vista SP1, slated for release to manufacturing in the first quarter of 2008, is not meant to be about new features, but about already existing components gaining new functionality. Over at Geek.com, Brian Osborne explains what he has learned about the first major update to the software giant's latest OS. Apart from performance, security and reliability, including all previously released updates, SP1 will incorporate additional support for hardware and standards including an Extensible Firmware Interface (EFI) and an Extended File Allocation Table (exFAT).

In SP1, BitLocker Drive Encryption will be able to encrypt other local volumes besides the C drive. Disk Defragmenter will give administrators the ability to control which volume the program defragments. The Network Diagnostics tool has been expanded to help diagnose common file sharing problems and issues associated with printing to local printers from a Windows Terminal Services session. Group Policy tools are also being updated in SP1 to simplify policy management. Nick White, Microsoft Product Manager, also notes that laptop users will be happy to know that SP1 will offer a number of performance improvements, including: "optimization to improve power consumption when the display is not changing by managing the processor so it consumes less energy; single sign-on (SSO) for authenticated wired networks; and improvements in the method used to determine which network interface to use (e.g., should a laptop use wireless or wired networking when both are available)."

Many believe that service packs for Vista won't be as indispensable as they were for previous Microsoft operating systems. This is due to the fact that the company is taking full advantage of the Windows Update client in Vista to push patches and enhancements. "Users looking to deploy Windows Vista are best served by not making their deployment schedules contingent upon SP1 availability," said White. And yet, SP1 may open the door for adoption of Windows Vista by more enterprises since many make it a point not to roll out a new version of Windows until the first service pack is released. Following the current Vista SP1 closed beta, a pre-release of SP1 will be available to MSDN and TechNet subscribers.

News source: Geek.com

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

HD DVD vendors drop prices

Next Story

Prank Starts 25 Years of Security Woes

14 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

quoting from pure legends wiki link

According to Ron Minnich, the lead developer for LinuxBIOS, one of the stated goals of EFI is to "protect hardware vendors' intellectual property". This raises security concerns and notably makes creating a free software implementation impossible. EFI could be used to create a "DRM BIOS", thus letting vendors build computers which limit what the user can do.[17]

Well, it "could be" used to do that yeah, because EFI can load up before the OS and connect to the internet and check itself and so on and so on. But they've been saying stuff like this for years. Anyways, right now, EFI is what locks OSX to Mac's, and is why you have to emulate it to run OSX on generic PC. Also, the version of EFI used on Macs is different than the one they'll be using for PCs I think. Maybe someone can double check that though.

GP007 said,
Well, it "could be" used to do that yeah, because EFI can load up before the OS and connect to the internet and check itself and so on and so on. But they've been saying stuff like this for years. Anyways, right now, EFI is what locks OSX to Mac's, and is why you have to emulate it to run OSX on generic PC. Also, the version of EFI used on Macs is different than the one they'll be using for PCs I think. Maybe someone can double check that though.

I would say that it does conform to the specification but they've added a bit (where they can customise) which identifies itself as a Mac to the installer - and thus the installer continues.

As for DRM, it could be done using the existing BIOS, there is nothing stopping it being done today, yesterday or into the future. Yes, it would be nicer if the world were using OpenBoot but the reality is, its not going to happen.

billyea said,
Does that mean Boot Camp won't have to translate BIOS calls for Vista SP1 anymore?

It means you won't need bootcamp at all. If you can just boot up Vista normally with EFI support, then it's just like runing OSX