No Java, Flash for iPhone this Christmas

There is still a little time left, but it doesn't look like Apple iPhone users will see Adobe Systems and Sun Microsystems get Flash and Java up and running on Apple's handheld device by Christmas.

Although both Sun and Adobe have expressed a desire to back the iPhone for nearly a year, neither the Flash Player nor Java Virtual Machine run on the device. And it appears that little to no progress is being made. Sun and Adobe, the chief proponents of the Java and Flash platforms, respectively, repeat what they've said all year: that they are still working to get their software platforms running on the trendy phone. Apple, for its part, did not respond to numerous inquiries about the iPhone from InfoWorld.

Enabling Flash and Java to run on the iPhone would expand the volume of applications that could run on the device. But no one seems to know why Flash and Java aren't available for the iPhone. By comparison, the mobile Flash Lite does run on the Symbian OS, an Android version is in the works, and the forthcoming Windows Mobile version will support it. The Java VM or its mobile cousin J2ME run on the Android, Symbian, and Windows Mobile OSes.

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May I be the 1st non Apple Fanboy to say...
WHO CARES?!?!?!?!!?!?
If apple added the Smell-o-phone option... I would call both of you and FART on it...

But dont click this

This article has been festering for 22 hours and I sacrificed myself to respond

The iPhone is the main topic of tech conversation these days. It isn't my fault that Apple released such an exciting product.

When will you be getting one?

Are you serious? Exciting? It is a phone?
How can you get excited over a phone?
#1 Internet - any computer is better than tapping on something the size of a pop-tart
#2 movies - "Hey Honey, lets watch Ironman on my iphone?" mmmm-nah
#3 chat capabilities - apple must have that on the phone, just about every phone has that. Nah, I prefer to use the phone for it's intended design: calling and talking.
#4 it will be sitting in a charger 98.23222% of the time. I cannot justify paying a premium price for it's most common use

When will I get one?
Hold your breath, I'll let you know


Like Steve Jobs said
"I build machines specifically built for stupid people. My goal is to program every one of my users to just buy more of my stuff. If I can take 2 or 3 things and put it together and put an Apple logo on and people blindly go buy it, I accomplished enough in my life. Consumers are like chimps and I am the man with the bananas and organ grinder."

Take care and god bless

atari800 said,
Are you serious? Exciting? It is a phone?
How can you get excited over a phone?
#1 Internet - any computer is better than tapping on something the size of a pop-tart
#2 movies - "Hey Honey, lets watch Ironman on my iphone?" mmmm-nah
#3 chat capabilities - apple must have that on the phone, just about every phone has that. Nah, I prefer to use the phone for it's intended design: calling and talking.
#4 it will be sitting in a charger 98.23222% of the time. I cannot justify paying a premium price for it's most common use

When will I get one?
Hold your breath, I'll let you know


Like Steve Jobs said
"I build machines specifically built for stupid people. My goal is to program every one of my users to just buy more of my stuff. If I can take 2 or 3 things and put it together and put an Apple logo on and people blindly go buy it, I accomplished enough in my life. Consumers are like chimps and I am the man with the bananas and organ grinder."

Take care and god bless


So . . . is it difficult to decide what kind of string you need to attach to the two tin cans you'll be calling people with?

Enabling other platforms to run on the iPhone is precisely what Apple is trying to avoid. It is both a business and a usability decision to restrict the iPhone to running new applications only from the iTunes App Store, and naturally it has positive and negative consequences, depending on your perspective. Restricting iPhone applications to the iTunes App Store and Apple's Cocoa programming language ensures Apple gets to control the entire application process from start to finish (for better and worse), and it provides a great outlet for third party developers to get apps in front of users. Apple of course makes money from developer fees and each transaction, but developers also don't have to bother with hosting and financial management.

Apple also gets to ensure a more seamless experience of finding, installing, and updating applications, but that means blocking out third-party application platforms from running on the device. Java and Flash applications would invariably not adhere to the behavior and UI rules that Apple enforces for iPhone apps, and there is also a much higher potential for malicious software to spread across what is now the best selling phone in the US.

Don't expect Java or Flash to show up on the iPhone anytime soon, no matter what the competition is adopting. It makes absolutely no sense considering the rampant success Apple has already achieved with the iPhone 2.0 platform in barely 6 months.

David Chartier said,
Enabling other platforms to run on the iPhone is precisely what Apple is trying to avoid. It is both a business and a usability decision to restrict the iPhone to running new applications only from the iTunes App Store, and naturally it has positive and negative consequences, depending on your perspective. Restricting iPhone applications to the iTunes App Store and Apple's Cocoa programming language ensures Apple gets to control the entire application process from start to finish (for better and worse), and it provides a great outlet for third party developers to get apps in front of users. Apple of course makes money from developer fees and each transaction, but developers also don't have to bother with hosting and financial management.

Apple also gets to ensure a more seamless experience of finding, installing, and updating applications, but that means blocking out third-party application platforms from running on the device. Java and Flash applications would invariably not adhere to the behavior and UI rules that Apple enforces for iPhone apps, and there is also a much higher potential for malicious software to spread across what is now the best selling phone in the US.

Don't expect Java or Flash to show up on the iPhone anytime soon, no matter what the competition is adopting. It makes absolutely no sense considering the rampant success Apple has already achieved with the iPhone 2.0 platform in barely 6 months.

One of the most lucid explanations I've ever come across. No illusions.