Nokia CEO talks more about Windows Phone 7 launch

Nokia is still keeping things close to the vest in terms of its plans to launch its first smartphones with Microsoft's Windows Phone 7 operating system running inside. Today, however, Nokia's CEO Stephen Elop gave some more info about what the company is doing to prepare for the launch of the products that could be a "make it or break it" situation for the financially troubled Nokia. According to a ZDNet report, Elop revealed this info during a speech in China.

Nokia's working relationship with Microsoft on Windows Phone 7 is different than other smartphone makers, such as HTC and Samsung, that also make phones with Microsoft's operating system. Elop said that Microsoft has given Nokia access to all of Windows Phone 7's source code which is something that the other smartphone makers don't have. That should allow Nokia, in theory, to offer phones that will have unique features that won't be available on other Windows Phone 7 based devices. Elop also said that there is a new focus at Nokia to enable a "more aggressive decision making" policy that should allow for more innovation to be fostered at the company.

Other smartphone makers have also started to launch tablet products. Elop said that the company is "aware of the need" for such devices but stopped short of saying that the company would release some kind of tablet product.

Elop also dismissed rumors that Microsoft would eventually purchase Nokia, much like how Google is proposing to purchase one of its Android smartphone makers, Motorola Mobility. He states, "It creates a great deal of uncertainty for the Android ecosystem. I’m sure it is of great concern for many of the Android participants."

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Microsoft tablet strategy in not dependant on Nokia. Smartphone's success is however tied together.

I wonder who writes Mr. Elop statements:

Referring to Google buying Motorola he stated:

"It creates a great deal of uncertainty for the Android ecosystem. I'm sure it is of great concern for many of the Android participants."

but right before he also said:

"Nokia's working relationship with Microsoft on Windows Phone 7 is different than other smartphone makers, such as HTC and Samsung, that also make phones with Microsoft's operating system. Microsoft has given Nokia access to all of Windows Phone 7's source code which is something that the other smartphone makers don't have."

Now words are...... words so everything could change but Google stated that Motorola will not have any preferential access to Androi OS, Elop says the opposite about the Nokia/MS deal and then comments about how Android OEMs should be wary...... but what about MS partners?

Again I am not questioning the deals just the poor wording coming from a CEO.

FMH said,

With the most expensive ring ever made. It costs $12.5 billion.

Yea right

But why is it written "proposing" when the deal is almost done?

Mohitster said,

Yea right

But why is it written "proposing" when the deal is almost done?


Hardly. It has to go through a lot of processes and is expected to complete by some time in 2012.

well all i can say is MS give them a billion dollar deal i HIGHLY doubt nokia would fill it with bloat ware that angers WP customers alienating them from nokia cus MS would be really ****ed off. Id imagine it would be more on the lines of customization BUT even nokia would have the same guidelines as far as tiles etc i would assume

Nokia can't fork windows phone 7 like Android because Microsoft owns the code. A forked windows phone os can't be called windows phone os because it's not.

If Nokia has full access to the source code then I don't want it. I already have enough bloated "features" to deal with on Android.

bjoswald said,
If Nokia has full access to the source code then I don't want it. I already have enough bloated "features" to deal with on Android.

It doesn't necessarily have to be a negative. Just wait and see what they do before you judge.

bjoswald said,
If Nokia has full access to the source code then I don't want it. I already have enough bloated "features" to deal with on Android.

I don't think they will change much. Imagine what pain they would go through to update if they did that.

bjoswald said,
If Nokia has full access to the source code then I don't want it. I already have enough bloated "features" to deal with on Android.

Far too early to judge what those words mean. Having access to the source code and being able to fork the code are two different animals.

For example, as a .NET developer I have access to the .NET Framework's source code. This doesn't mean I have the ability to fork .NET and create a new version though as the license doesn't allow that.

See: http://referencesource.microsoft.com/netframework.aspx

bjoswald said,
If Nokia has full access to the source code then I don't want it. I already have enough bloated "features" to deal with on Android.

From what Microsoft and Nokia has said, it sounds more like a partnership, where Nokia will be working with Microsoft on features in future versions of WP7 than rolling their own version...

"Microsoft has given Nokia access to all of Windows Phone 7's source code"
This makes me NOT want to buy a Nokia phone. What guarentee do I have if I buy a Nokia phone that some time in the future I won't get a bastardized version of Windows Phone 7? How is this any different to Android? A hope and a dream and a pocket full of wishes that Nokia won't do anything bad, they promise, truly they do.

BrentNewbury said,
"Microsoft has given Nokia access to all of Windows Phone 7's source code"
This makes me NOT want to buy a Nokia phone. What guarentee do I have if I buy a Nokia phone that some time in the future I won't get a bastardized version of Windows Phone 7? How is this any different to Android? A hope and a dream and a pocket full of wishes that Nokia won't do anything bad, they promise, truly they do.

Why does everyone on this forum argue with me on this point? Nokia will most definitely have something different then the other manufacturers that have WP7. Of this I am sure. And it is this point that will make WP7 very much like Android. Finally somebody on this forum sees this.

BrentNewbury said,
"Microsoft has given Nokia access to all of Windows Phone 7's source code"
This makes me NOT want to buy a Nokia phone. What guarentee do I have if I buy a Nokia phone that some time in the future I won't get a bastardized version of Windows Phone 7? How is this any different to Android? A hope and a dream and a pocket full of wishes that Nokia won't do anything bad, they promise, truly they do.

What guarantee do you have? The fact Elop is not an idiot, and knows very well that forking WP7 would be a bad idea. Oh, and, the fact he said so several times in public.

Aethec said,

What guarantee do you have? The fact Elop is not an idiot, and knows very well that forking WP7 would be a bad idea. Oh, and, the fact he said so several times in public.
So, like I said, a hope dream and a and a pocket full of wishes. Elop may not, but his successors might. As long as its similar to what Frazell said (being similar to how the .net source, then it's all fine and dandy.

BrentNewbury said,
"Microsoft has given Nokia access to all of Windows Phone 7's source code"
This makes me NOT want to buy a Nokia phone. What guarentee do I have if I buy a Nokia phone that some time in the future I won't get a bastardized version of Windows Phone 7? How is this any different to Android? A hope and a dream and a pocket full of wishes that Nokia won't do anything bad, they promise, truly they do.

"Access to source code" doesn't mean "right to modyfy the code and distribute changed it".

I actually like Microsoft to get rid of "Windows" in Windows Phone and just call it Phone x.xx.

Xbox, Office both stand on their own, so I don't see why their mobile department couldn't either. Slapping Windows on their phone isn't a good idea...but too late.