Nokia loves the Snapdragon S4 chip and melting butter

The launch of the Windows Phone 8 later this year is a boost for Qualcomm, which has its Snapdragon processors inside current and upcoming Windows Phone devices. That includes the upcoming Lumia 920 and 820 smartphones.

In a new post on the official Nokia blog, the company offers up a list of seven features that it says the Snapdragon S4 processor brings to the Lumia 920. One of them is lower battery use. Nokia says:

The Snapdragon S4 processor has been transitioned to a 28nm process (from 45nm), which makes it smallest in the industry, yet it still packs in more transistors. This new process also reduces leakage so that the chip consumes very little energy, helping your smartphone battery last all day.

The blog also links to a Qualcomm video where testers at the processor maker actually places sticks of butter on a smartphone with the Snapdragon S4, along with two other unnamed competitors, and shows how the butter melts much faster on the two other phones compared to the Snapdragon S4.

Other features mentioned in the Nokia blog include better security, higher resolution screens, and support for 4G LTE networks that won't drain the battery as much as previous smartphones with LTE wireless hardware.

Source: Nokia Conversations blog | Image via Qualcomm

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Windows 8 digital graffiti artists wanted by Microsoft

Next Story

Windows Phone Dev Center offers translation feature

22 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

The thing is, unless we're able to identify the competitors clearly this test would be somewhat useless.

For all I know they could be using phones with competitor processors from older generations, with different semiconductor manufacturing processes. For example, it'd be interesting to compare the S4 (28nm) with an OMAP5 (also 28nm). OMAP4 was built using a 45nm technology, which makes it not a fair contestant to the other one I believe. Same for the Tegra line, although there are no 28nm processors there yet. Also, knowing clock speed, core numbers, etc. would be useful too.

And even then, we're supposed to believe they're using the same application. If I were Qualcomm I'd show some transparency in the test and maybe use different ways of comparing. They make microprocessors, not phones, so doing the same test with bare chipsets and microprocessors would be more interesting.

Nashy said,
That looks like a Galaxy S2 yes? So old tech compared to new tech? Good stuff.

Well new tech to Nokia, Android devices have been using Snapdragon 4 for several months now...Welcome to yesterday Nokia!

well tbh whether the s4 runs hotter or not i think the polycarbonate shell shields the user from heat really well anyway. Its not some crappy bit of plastic its what bike helmets are made from to keeping ppl from cracking there heads open when they fall off. its got alot of resistance.

i wont scratch to easy and looks good which i think is one of the best looking smartphones out. simple design, solid and durable colour baked in if you choose it. all round another great product from nokia. ive got lumia 800 15 montsh left on contract but ill defo be checking out luming 920 and other wp8 in shops also checking out iphone 5 (which there aint much to se). already seen the galaxy s3 which is a really good smartphone tbh. so yah

FMH said,
Can anyone recognize the Competitor A and B?

Competitor A looks like a Motorola Droid RAZR - it has a TI OMAP 4430 chipset inside. Can't tell what B is from the butter picture, but it could be a Samsung Galaxy S II if it's the same as the thermal heat map image

I have a bunch of 24bit Audio files. And they never say if it runs these music files without down converting. I'm a big fan of hdtracks.com

Mike, I have never used a ST-Ericsson before so I don't even know how good or bad they are, I did see that Samsung is using them on some phones and Lenovo as well but like I said I have no Idea if this is good or bad.

Gibbyhome said,
Mike, I have never used a ST-Ericsson before so I don't even know how good or bad they are, I did see that Samsung is using them on some phones and Lenovo as well but like I said I have no Idea if this is good or bad.

To be honest I wasn't aware of them either until pointed out. I am sure they provided the chips for their older phones N95 etc.

I guess in the end they didn't manage to come through with a good enough processor.

here found a good link indicating troubles at ST http://www.eetimes.com/electro...-plans-production-stoppages

Gibbyhome said,
Mike, I have never used a ST-Ericsson before so I don't even know how good or bad they are, I did see that Samsung is using them on some phones and Lenovo as well but like I said I have no Idea if this is good or bad.

They provide the chips for almost all the Sony Xperia phones (NovaThor 8500 -> Dual-Core A9 with Mali 400 graphics).

V9s said,

They provide the chips for almost all the Sony Xperia phones (NovaThor 8500 -> Dual-Core A9 with Mali 400 graphics).

Good to know! I hope they don't go out of business! Competition is needed.

Enill said,
Now i want to eat some toasts... or popcorn.

After reading your comment, I'm going to make some toasts (and tea) for me. Thank you!

Hmmm, I wonder what ever happened to the ST-Ericsson Chips that was going to go into the Nokia phones ? I remember reading when MS and Nokia made the agreement that ST-Ericsson was stocking up for a windows launch ? not much about them since than...

Gibbyhome said,
Hmmm, I wonder what ever happened to the ST-Ericsson Chips that was going to go into the Nokia phones ? I remember reading when MS and Nokia made the agreement that ST-Ericsson was stocking up for a windows launch ? not much about them since than...

There was a retraction by ST-Ericsson saying something along the lines that it will be for future devices instead. (Meaning wp8 etc) But just like you I wonder on what happened to them.