Notepad++ 6.4.3

Notepad++ is a free (as in "free speech" and also as in "free beer") source code editor and Notepad replacement that supports several languages. Running in the MS Windows environment, its use is governed by GPL License.

Based on the powerful editing component Scintilla, Notepad++ is written in C++ and uses pure Win32 API and STL which ensures a higher execution speed and smaller program size. By optimizing as many routines as possible without losing user friendliness, Notepad++ is trying to reduce the world carbon dioxide emissions. When using less CPU power, the PC can throttle down and reduce power consumption, resulting in a greener environment.

What's new in Notepad++ 6.4.3:

  • Fix a crash issue while using Function list.
  • Enhance delimiter selection (Ctrl + Mouse Double Click) - add GUI settings in Preferences dialog.
  • Add open session in the new instance capacity.
  • Add new command line argument "-openSession" for opening a session file.
  • Add multi-instance option.
  • Fix regression -systemtray command line option not working properly.
  • Fix begin/end selection bug after the text modification between the begin and end position.
  • Add localization command line option -LlangCode where langCode is browser language code.

Download setup: Notepad++ 6.4.3 | 7.1 MB (Open Source)
Download portable: Notepad++ 6.4.3 | 4.2 MB
View: Notepad++ Home page

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18 Comments

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Dot Matrix said,
Really like N++, but just can't get past it's horrible UI.

Considering that you see metro interface as the pinnacle of everything I say... you live in a completely different reality than many of us that prefer efficiency before looks.

Arceles said,

Considering that you see metro interface as the pinnacle of everything I say... you live in a completely different reality than many of us that prefer efficiency before looks.

N++ isn't even efficient. The UI doesn't conform to any Microsoft design guidelines, which causes users much trouble. For example, the God-awful question mark used for the Help menu.

Dot Matrix said,

N++ isn't even efficient. The UI doesn't conform to any Microsoft design guidelines, which causes users much trouble. For example, the God-awful question mark used for the Help menu.

Yeah because every application needs to comply with almighty Microsoft's style...
And you clearly don't know what "efficient" means...

Not sure why such a simple app is so difficult for you, but it works great for me.

Astra.Xtreme said,

Yeah because every application needs to comply with almighty Microsoft's style...
And you clearly don't know what "efficient" means...

Not sure why such a simple app is so difficult for you, but it works great for me.


I have no issues with Notepad++, but I've been using it for many years.

But it is sometimes annoying it ignores most of the Windows desktop GUI guidelines, while its a Windows only program, would've been nice if they followed the basic design principles.

But its obvious this is written by and for coders

I use N++ for an awful lot, but it certainly has its frustrations. Throwing a hissy fit because someone doesn't wholeheartedly accept something on grounds you don't connect with doesn't exactly make you an attractive person, but I digress.

N++ could make a lot of improvements with regard to feature discoverability. It also wouldn't be the end of the world if it let you open a second window in some intuitive way (impossible from the Windows taskbar for no good reason) other than dragging a tab outside of the current view.

And I wouldn't mind being able to open extremely large text files (such as logs). It seems to buckle under a few hundred megs.

Otherwise, it's a champ for my purposes. Though for all the language syntax recognition, it'd be neat if it offered a way to auto-format code. It's possible it already does, but again, feature discoverability is not N++'s strong point.

Joshie said,

N++ could make a lot of improvements with regard to feature discoverability. It also wouldn't be the end of the world if it let you open a second window in some intuitive way (impossible from the Windows taskbar for no good reason) other than dragging a tab outside of the current view.

They actually just added multi-instance options. If you go in the preferences, you can tell it to always run in multi-instance mode.

Astra.Xtreme said,

They actually just added multi-instance options. If you go in the preferences, you can tell it to always run in multi-instance mode.


Ah hah, setting it to always lets me middle click its taskbar icon to open a new window. Thanks for that! It's too bad it doesn't offer something closer to the behavior of other applications, though.

Sitting in Excel and web browsers all day, I'm used to a distinct type of behavior. A new tab in an existing window is opened by default, but a second instance can be started by relaunching the app from the taskbar if desired. This seems pretty standard for all web browsers and a great deal of productivity software. I don't really understand why N++ has trouble implementing it.

Joshie said,

Ah hah, setting it to always lets me middle click its taskbar icon to open a new window. Thanks for that! It's too bad it doesn't offer something closer to the behavior of other applications, though.

Sitting in Excel and web browsers all day, I'm used to a distinct type of behavior. A new tab in an existing window is opened by default, but a second instance can be started by relaunching the app from the taskbar if desired. This seems pretty standard for all web browsers and a great deal of productivity software. I don't really understand why N++ has trouble implementing it.

Yeah they're making baby steps it seems.

Dot Matrix said,

N++ isn't even efficient. The UI doesn't conform to any Microsoft design guidelines, which causes users much trouble. For example, the God-awful question mark used for the Help menu.

Whats wrong with using a question mark to represent "Help .. I have a question" ..seems pretty self explanatory. Could be worse, they could hide most of the UI.

warwagon said,

Whats wrong with using a question mark to represent "Help .. I have a question" ..seems pretty self explanatory. Could be worse, they could hide most of the UI.

It doesn't conform to set UI guidelines. Windows isn't Linux, it isn't a horror show of mix-matched junk. User friendliness and functionality are key, that's why Microsoft makes these guidelines.

And what if they did hide most of the UI? The UI doesn't need to be constantly shown to get work done.

Dot Matrix said,

It doesn't conform to set UI guidelines. Windows isn't Linux, it isn't a horror show of mix-matched junk. User friendliness and functionality are key, that's why Microsoft makes these guidelines.

And what if they did hide most of the UI? The UI doesn't need to be constantly shown to get work done.


Visibility is generally less important than discoverability and accessibility. You could make an app where every single function has a dedicated icon on the default toolbar, and it would be awful--one big visual tl;dr. You could make it freely customizable, but then you'd just be a lazy designer, putting the task of usability onto the user.

Better to have a mix of customizability and out-of-the-box usability, and that means understanding the best features to bring forward and the best way to present them. 'Advanced' users will kick and scream about this kind of "dumbing down" of UI, but as far as I'm concerned, that's just more of the same old exclusionary "RTFM" attitude that deservedly buried Linux's desktop dreams.