NPD: Chromebooks now claim 20-25 percent of sub-$300 US laptop sales

A couple of months ago, a report from Digitimes claimed that sales of Chromebooks had totaled just 500,000 units in the first 21 months since the first Chrome OS laptop went on sale. But has that situation changed? A new report from the NPD research firm suggests that sales of Chromebooks are doing better than expected.

In an interview with ZDNet, Stephen Baker, NPD's Vice President of Industry Analysis for Consumer Technology, claims that Chromebooks that have prices below $300 have now claimed 20 to 25 percent of the US markets for laptops in that price region in the last eight month. In fact, Baker claims that sales of Chromebooks in general now make up five percent of the total PC market in the US.

Part of the reason for the upswing in sales is that Chromebooks in general have improved in terms of hardware. While the first generation of these laptops were hard to use without an Internet connection, the current versions can now handle more offline activities. Yet another reason is that Google has been pushing Chromebooks hard in terms of marketing and promotion, particularly with their "For Everyone" TV ads.

The good news for Microsoft? Baker says that NPD has seen sales growth for Windows 8 notebooks in that same sub-$300 price point as well. He stated, "There's a trend towards aggressively priced PCs. These PCs are filling in the space left where the netbook used to be."

Source: ZDNet | Image via Google

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Dutchie64 said,
I see people complain all the time about 24h internet connection.....
Doesn't the Chomebooks need this to function at all?
If you have no internet, a Chtromebook is basically an expensive paperweight. This doesn't make any sense at all.

My Windows Laptop is a bigger paperweight than a Chromebook without an Internet connection. I can get my email for work, I can't get my up to date calendar, I can't work with ArcGIS .

In general, I would say you can do much more offline with a windows pc than a chromebook. Personally, I am able to get my work email and calendar just fine, so I'm not sure what blocks you from doing so.

Anyway, Chromebooks have a useful niche to fill. They are basically tablets in a pc-like for factor, which means they can be cheaper than most laptops and offer the simplicity of a tablet that many people want (as a consumption device). Anyone that just has basic needs like email and internet, they work fine. It also helps if you are completely tied to Google services. Like any OS today, your experience is better if your in their ecosystem of services. Win 8/WP is better with MS services, Macs and iOS is better with Apple services, and Android/Chromebook is better with Google services.

trooper11 said,
In general, I would say you can do much more offline with a windows pc than a chromebook. Personally, I am able to get my work email and calendar just fine, so I'm not sure what blocks you from doing so.

I work remotely. So my laptop needs an Internet connection. Tell me how do I access a license for my AutoDesk and ArcGIS product that is shared on a server. My laptop is a paperweight.

The Internet argument against the Chromebook has become the only argument against buying it when most people who use computer use it for the web. Yeah sounds very stupid so how are they getting the web in the first place? This argument baffles my mind.

You know what's wrong with a desktop machine? It needs power, so if you don't have power you are essentially having a box in your room taking up needles space. Don't buy desktop because it requires power.

I like my Chromebook. It's the perfect university companion for writing and surfing the web. Also, if you use Google Services heavily, you have pretty much everything with you, always.

causa45 said,
I like my Chromebook. It's the perfect university companion for writing and surfing the web. Also, if you use Google Services heavily, you have pretty much everything with you, always.

Ditto. I love my Chromebook as well. Trolls feel threatened. I don't know why. You still need a traditional PC.

Maybe because after the collapse of netbooks Chromebooks will be one of the few sub-300 laptops still available? The rest has been replaced, or is in the progress of being replaced, by tablets.

I have the latest Samsung ChromeBook too, I and my wife use it to browse the internet, and connect remotely to the Windows Desktop (VM) using Chrome Remote Desktop, the remote desktop is pretty fast and works just from anywhere regardless of the ip addresses.

The Good things:

No viruses, no formats, no maintenance, fast boot, no heat, long battery life, very nice to browse the internet, watch YouTube, write some documents (although I prefer Word), very light, can connect to a Windows or a Mac pc from anywhere for free, easy video conference, and much more.

The bad things:

Limited processor performance, while most of the sites are ok, Google Plus is slow from ChromeBook

I still see it as a good investment for businesses, business can write their internal apps in html (even as Offline Html Desktop Apps, Chrome calls them Packaged Apps) and run them on Chrome, there is no need for maintenance, formatting, viruses, you name it, all gone. a lot of money can be saved there by not using Windows

For home use? Well, still limited!

john.smith_2084 said,
Limited processor performance, while most of the sites are ok, Google Plus is slow from ChromeBook

I have the same Chromebook as you and Google+ runs just as well in my Chromebook as it does in my Windows Core i7 Laptop. I wonder if you have some scripts running through Tampermonkey or bad extensions that slow you down. I would look into that.

DarkNet said,

I have the same Chromebook as you and Google+ runs just as well in my Chromebook as it does in my Windows Core i7 Laptop. I wonder if you have some scripts running through Tampermonkey or bad extensions that slow you down. I would look into that.

Ahhh, we both know that is not true

john.smith_2084 said,

Ahhh, we both know that is not true

Actually if you want I can do a hangout with you from my windows machine pointing at my Chromebook and you can try to prove me wrong. In fact we can post the link here for people to see. You can also do the same and I will show you where your mistakes are.

You are saying the latest Samsung Chromebook which I have. The products are identical but the users are clearly not. So what do you say?

Spicoli said,
Is $300 some magic price barrier or did they just pick that in order to have a story?

$299 is a great price point for a lot of people. I didn't hesitate to spend $249 on my Samsung Chromebook last November. Especially considering what it does and how portable it is.

A simple Google search will show you several products with stories on $299 Price Point

http://blogs.golf.com/equipmen...umber-for-a-new-driver.html
http://www.engadget.com/2007/0...ayers-to-reach-299-in-2007/
http://www.tuaw.com/2011/08/22...rbished-ipads-now-just-299/
http://forums.macrumors.com/archive/index.php/t-1570373.html
http://www.maximumpc.com/artic...%80%93_some_models_sell_out
http://www.avsforum.com/t/5706...399-w-hd-or-299-without/240
http://www.ubergizmo.com/2012/02/emerging-market-tablets/
http://www.thecomputermagician...w-how-do-i-create-read-more
http://www.psxextreme.com/ps4-news/173.html

These stories have one thing in common. They all use the terminology "magic price" or "magic number".

So yeah it wasn't something they picked, consumers picked it.

Spicoli said,
I can give you a bigger list at sub-400. Why did they pick 300?

Never mind. You have your mind made up. Go about your day.

Spicoli said,
I can give you a bigger list at sub-400. Why did they pick 300?

Cause it's 100$ less. Maybe for evangelists 100$ is not a lot of money. But for a family of four this is often the difference between having a "laptop" for everyday tasks and not having one.

I have yet to see a Chromebook at Starbucks, McDonalds, etc. The only place I have seen them was at a chess tournament at a school in their library. They were not using them for Chrome but as remote access to their windows environment.

chromebook 0
WindowsPhone 0
Windows 8 RT 1
Surface 0
iPad too many to count
Android tablets too many to count

corrosive23 said,
I have counted over 50 on the University of Arizona campus. Surface? 0

Everybody's complaining about the Surface being priced at a premium, yet *somebody* had to go ahead and try to compare it with how a dirt-cheap laptop is doing in a "poor student" setting. Yeah, makes sense to me.

In my case, the chromebooks webpage says
"Buy a Chromebook online for just € 449."

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU

Chromebooks will always be a niche product that only diehard Scroogle users will buy. It's useless without internet connection being on 24 hours and you'll be watched by big brother Scroogle with advertising!

So in theory that % of people i know buying cheap laptops would be using a chromebook? I have never seen one, not even for sale in local shops.

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