NVIDIA announces VGX cloud-based PC graphics solution

NVIDIA has decided to put its PC graphics technology in use for cloud-based graphics solutions. The company announced this week its plans to introduce what it is calling VGX. It basically takes NVIDIA GPUs, based on its recently launched Kepler design, and puts them into cloud servers that should allow users to have high end graphics and software experiences even on low end PCs and tablets.

According to the press release:

The NVIDIA VGX platform enables up to 100 users to be served from a single server powered by one VGX board, dramatically improving user density on a single server compared with traditional virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) solutions. It sharply reduces such issues as latency, sluggish interaction and limited application support, all of which are associated with traditional VDI solutions.

The first NVIDIA VGX boards will have four GPUs along with 4 GB of frame buffer. Pricing and a release date will be revealed later this year.

NVIDIA has also announced a VGX related solution this week that will be of interest to PC gamers. It's called the GeForce GRID and NVIDIA says that streaming gaming services will be able to use the VGX technology to offer up high end PC games that can be streamed to work on low end machines. The press release states:

Featuring two Kepler architecture-based GPUs, each with its own encoder, the processors have 3,072 CUDA technology cores and 4.7 teraflops of 3D shader performance. This enables providers to render highly complex games in the cloud and encode them on the GPU, rather than the CPU, allowing their servers to simultaneously run more game streams. Server power-consumption per game stream is reduced to about one-half that of previous implementations, an important metric for data centers.

GeForce GRID already has a number of partners that will use the technology, including Gaikai.

Image via NVIDIA

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12 Comments

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Hooray, the future!
Let's sell worse products and cash in on upgrading them mediocrely from somewhere over the internet, locking them in!
The joy of cloud-based whatevers is, that someone with a calculator and the duty to create profits says when the game is over, not me, who's liking what he or she is using.

Cloud = mirroring only for me
I try to limit my dependence on cloud services as much as possible and I advice anyone with half a brain to do so, too.

You can't retro game on a server that's been closed

GS:mac

It's becoming more and more apparent that upgrading a computer is becoming more and more obsolete. All that's left is the need for a Permanent OS from Microsoft and Apple with only paid Service Packs at the EOL. Not an Issue with Linux. Eventually Microsoft will be forced to stop it's forced upgrades and OS lock-ins.

Even my 6 year old computer cam run the new star wars MMO and the recent Diablo 3. I'll probably just stop upgrading hardware after my next build, not really a need for it. I could probably go on with my current build for 6 more years if I wanted too.

Only hardcore gamers would be left and even that is less and less as more of them move to consoles and tablets. In 10-15 years we should start seeing permanent hardware and software, or less.

Mike Frett said,
It's becoming more and more apparent that upgrading a computer is becoming more and more obsolete. All that's left is the need for a Permanent OS from Microsoft and Apple with only paid Service Packs at the EOL. Not an Issue with Linux. Eventually Microsoft will be forced to stop it's forced upgrades and OS lock-ins.

Even my 6 year old computer cam run the new star wars MMO and the recent Diablo 3. I'll probably just stop upgrading hardware after my next build, not really a need for it. I could probably go on with my current build for 6 more years if I wanted too.

Only hardcore gamers would be left and even that is less and less as more of them move to consoles and tablets. In 10-15 years we should start seeing permanent hardware and software, or less.

http://cdn.memegenerator.net/instances/400x/20541194.jpg

Mike Frett said,
Only hardcore gamers would be left and even that is less and less as more of them move to consoles and tablets. In 10-15 years we should start seeing permanent hardware and software, or less.
Hardcore gamers and tablets in the same sentence? Good sir, your credibility was withstanding until that tripe.

Mike Frett said,

Even my 6 year old computer cam run the new star wars MMO and the recent Diablo 3.

Not like my computer can...

Therein lies the difference. We are still many iterations away from realtime photoreal graphics at frame rates and resolutions that would rival reality--the benchmark.

And with wall-sized televisions coming at 4xHD and higher, there is still a lot of demand to serve for some time to come.

Windows tablets can begin to encroach if they had wireless (or one wire) HD+ docking, etc.

Edited by excalpius, May 17 2012, 11:42pm :

I tried Gaikai and definitely found its latency much more bearable than Onlive. In fact playing a driving game felt like it was locally hosted. I was never one for cloud gaming but with Nvidia in their corner Gaikai could do very well.

Does this mean javascript and other client side languages are dead? Wouldnt server side language be all that counts now that the end users PC wont do any of the graphics processing?