NVIDIA Geforce GTX 680 video shows off new features

If you have a PC gaming rig, chances are you want to get the fastest and most powerful dedicated graphics card you can afford to be installed inside it. Today, NVIDIA is announcing its latest and greatest PC graphics chip, the GeForce GTX 680. In a newly leaked video from NVIDIA, the company shows off some of the card's new features.

One of those new additions is being called GPU Boost. Basically, it increases the graphics card's clock speed when it is being used by graphically intensive PC games. The video uses Battlefield 3 as its example and it seems to show that the instant and automatic increase in the card's clock speed results in a big framerate boost in Battlefield 3.

Another new feature is TXAA, which is a new form of anti-aliasing. NVIDIA claims that using TXAA in games will result in far less "jaggies" while playing a PC game without impacting the frame rate.

The GeForce GTX 680 will also allow for games to support more realistic game physics via PhysX. The video shows an example of that where columns are being destroyed in real time without the use of pre-deterimned animation.

Finally, the video shows that game character designers can use the power of the GTX 680 to create more realistic fur on, say, a gorilla-like creature. The video shows this fur support in action, claiming that the demo shows 100,000 individual fur hairs on the creature.

The GeForce GTX 680 can also support up to four total screens running on one card. In addition, up to three of those cards can be used for playing games via 3D Vision support.

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So is this the card that can run the "Samaritan" demo on a single GPU? Pricing in the Uk doesn't seem too bad compared to the AMD competition, I'll probably wait a bit though, see what the companies like Gigabyte will come out with given time. Will probably wait for a mid card like the GTX560 also

Looks excellent! I'm waiting for the 660 (MSRP at around $320 I believe) to replace my current card.

I'm really impressed with GPU Boost, it's about time one of the big two implemented this feature.

BoneyardBrew said,
Looks excellent! I'm waiting for the 660 (MSRP at around $320 I believe) to replace my current card.

I'm really impressed with GPU Boost, it's about time one of the big two implemented this feature.

GPU Boost reads like on-demand overclocking. Obviously guaranteed to work until the threshold. According to nVidia the base clock can be still overclocked, but it's not clear whether the GPU Boost threshold will be overclockable too? Also what happens if you raise the base clock above the GPU Boost threshold? Anyway, we'll find out soon enough.

Looking impressive. If the GTX 670 ends up being roughly the same price as the GTX 570 currently is (around £220 over at Scan), then count me in.

They shouldn't use skyrim as an example of surround, Skyrim is no where near fully supporting it. Never mind the fact it's a very CPU heavy game.

A good evolutionary step.

Someone needs to come up with a unifying Physics engine which unite all game elements under one simulation.

Then we can create realistic worlds.

I say six more NVidia iterations coupled with DirectX 15.
Perhaps AMD can do something about it.

dotf said,
A good evolutionary step.

Someone needs to come up with a unifying Physics engine which unite all game elements under one simulation.

Then we can create realistic worlds.

I say six more NVidia iterations coupled with DirectX 15.
Perhaps AMD can do something about it.

They kinda do, OpenCL (http://www.khronos.org/opencl/), DirectCompute (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DirectCompute) but not seen either used in games, just alternate gpu processing non-game stuff. Both nvidia and amd support these standards.

Snake89 said,

game developers can use the bullet physics engine if they wanted to. Since it's used in some games an a ton of movies.

I use it in the game we are creating, good engine, awefull documentation. Compared to physx engine .... kind of mixed, but imho physx is ahead of bullet.

dotf said,
A good evolutionary step.

Someone needs to come up with a unifying Physics engine which unite all game elements under one simulation.

Then we can create realistic worlds.

Not really sure I like that idea (all games having the same or similar sort of physics-feel to them).