NVIDIA shows off new roadmaps for graphics and mobile chips

When he wasn't praying to "Outlook God" for a Windows RT port of Outlook, NVIDIA CEO Jen-Hsun Huang was presenting some new information on Tuesday about the company's future plans for graphics and mobile processors as part of NVIDIA's annual GPU Technology Conference.

NVIDIA's blog offers up the details of the presentation. In 2014, Huang stated that Maxwell will be launched as the successor to NVIDIA's current Kepler design for its GeForce graphics chips. Huang said it will use "unified virtual memory, which makes it possible for GPU operations to see the CPU memory and vice versa."

After that comes Volta, which NVIDIA will introduce in 2015. Volta will use something called "stacked DRAM" which Huang said " ... will have DRAM on same silica sub-strate, which will carry a whole bunch of DRAMs stacked atop each other. We’ll cut a hole through the silicon and connect each layer. We’re going to achieve one terabyte per second of bandwidth."

As far as its Tegra mobile chip lineup, NVIDIA promises to bring the successor to Tegra 4, code name 'Logan', in 2014. Huang said, "It has a Kepler GPU, with full CUDA 5, and OpenGL 4.3." In 2015 we get the next version of Tegra, code named 'Parker', which will be NVIDIA's first 64-bit ARM processor and will use the Maxwell graphics design.

In 2012, NVIDIA announced the GeForce Experience, a cloud-based system that allows PC gamers to have the best graphics settings on their games based on data from NVIDIA's servers. Today, NVIDIA announced its first cloud-based server for enterprise customers, the GRID Visual Computing Appliance. It's NVIDIA's first server product and each GRID VCA has two high end Xeon processors inside, along with 16 Kepler-based GPUs. Each box can support up to 16 users.

Source: NVIDIA | Images via NVIDIA

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