OCZ Acquires PC Power & Cooling

OCZ has announced it has acquired American supplier of power supply units PC Power & Cooling. Originally founded in 1985, PC Power & Cooling has been a frontrunner in ultra high-performance power supplies and cooling solutions for the enthusiast. OCZ aims to expand its product line through the acquisition, increase its R&D resources, and establish the organization as the leading provider of power-supply solutions. OCZ plans to combine the current product lines of both companies immediately after the acquisition is complete and make PC Power & Cooling's products available worldwide through its distribution channels. PCP&C's current line of power supply units will become the new line of high-end OCZ power supplies. Despite the acquisition, the power supplies will still maintain their PCP&C branding.

The acquisition will also result in a change in management for OCZ. The founder of PCP&C, Doug Dodson will move into the position of Chief Technology Officer at OCZ which was previously jointly filled by OCZ CEO Ryan Peterson and OCZ vice president of technology development Michael Schuette. Regarding his new position, Doug Dodson said "In my new role as Chief Technology Officer, I will focus on maintaining PC Power's lead in proven ultra high-performance with the Turbo-Cool line, and in value and quiet computing with the Silencer line, as well as provide guidance for the continuing improvement of OCZ's power management solutions."

News source: DailyTech

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I just read someone said Zalman make the second best PSU behind PC & Cooling... so anyone have a list of top 10 PSU manufacturer or similar? I always thought seasonic comes in second...

The biggest issue with PCP&C PSUs isn't their cost (with the sole exception of the Turbo-Cool 1kW-SR) but their *availability*. Unless you buy e-tail (and most people, when they need a replacement PSU for a computer, need it NOW, and therefore mostly buy retail) a PCP&C PSU can be tough, if not impossible, to find in a large part of North America (for example, I live in the eastern US, and since there are no Fry's Electronics locations here, the only retailer that carries *any* PCP&C products is MicroCenter, and they no longer stock the Silencer 750 Quad). In addition, the Silencer 750 Quad is SLI Certified (not many PSUs, from anybody, are both CrossFire *and* SLI Certified; they tend to be one or the other). I'm actually hoping for the increased availability (especially retail) without sacrificing quality. Modularity I could, in fact, care less about: one feature that I like about PCP&C PSUs is the large single rail (not just for new builds, but for replacement PSUs, such as the aforementioned Silencer 750 Quad).

PC Power and Cooling create their own power supplies; however, they did fabricate the Silencer 750W PSU and sent the specifications to SeaSonic to manufacture (source). They may have done this with other models, I'm not sure.

I thought they were American-made, which probably meant they were own-made.

I hope they don't get any stupid ideas. PCP&C was never seen as anything but a gold standard for quality in the industry, and it would be a disaster to repurpose it.

Nienor said,
I hope it will reduce the costs.
PCP&C are using Seasonic parts but they cost way more right now...

Really? They don't make their own?

Blaine said,

Really? They don't make their own?

I was stunned by that statement as well, so I googled and couldn't find anything other than
PCPower&Cooling, design and build all their PSU's and the Turbo-Cool series is almost entirely fabricated in-house

Then I found this page and this page that claim PCP&C manufacture their own. But after 20 minutes of searching, I couldn't find a single statement anywhere on any site to corroborate Nienor's claim. I could be looking in all the wrong places, but I doubt it.

And you can use the UL tool to find who exactly manufactured your PSU.