Office 2010 CTP and "Click to run" released to more testers

Today, more invitation e-mails were sent out to Microsoft Connect members for the Microsoft Office 2010 Technical Preview - a early look into the latest and greatest version of Microsoft Office. 32-bit and 64-bit versions of all programs are available.

Available for download from the connect site are:

    Microsoft Office Professional 2010
    Microsoft Word 2010
    Microsoft Excel 2010
    Microsoft PowerPoint 2010
    Microsoft OneNote 2010
    Microsoft Outlook 2010
    Microsoft Publisher 2010
    Microsoft Access 2010
    Microsoft Visio 2010
    Microsoft SharePointDesigner 2010
    Microsoft InfoPath 2010
    Microsoft SharePoint Workspace 2010
    Business Contact Manager for Microsoft Outlook 2010
    Microsoft Outlook Connector
    Microsoft Office Language Pack 2010 - English
    Microsoft Office Language Pack 2010 - Japanese
    Business Contact Manager for Microsoft Outlook 2010 Language Pack - Japanese
    Business Contact Manager for Microsoft Outlook 2010 Database Tool

Upgrades are available for the matching architecture - 32-bit Office 2007 can be upgraded to Office 2010, but Office 2007 running on a 64-bit Operating system cannot be upgraded to Office 2010 - you must uninstall Office 2007 first.

Hardware and software requirements are listed as:

    500 MHz processor or higher
    256 megabytes (MB) of RAM or higher
    2 gigabytes (GB). A part of this disk space is free after installation if the original download package is removed from the hard disk.
    CD-ROM drive or DVD drive
    1024 x 768 or higher-resolution monitor

Operating Systems supported are Windows XP with SP3 (32-Bit Only), Windows Vista SP1 (32-bit or 64-bit), Windows Server 2003 R2 with SP2 (32-bit or 64-bit), Windows Server 2008 with SP1 (32-bit or 64-bit) and Windows 7 (32-bit or 64-bit).

Microsoft has also sent out invites to the "Click-to-run" technical preview, which is a "streaming" version of Office 2010. The program runs once, and streams Microsoft Office "bits" to the users PC. Streaming only needs to happen once, and the programs remain on the computer afterward - the connect site explains:

"The program provides a first look at the future of Internet application deployment. It delivers the products rapidly to the computer via streaming over the Internet. The following Office 2010 desktop applications are included: Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook and OneNote" - could this be the start of a subscription based model?


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24 Comments

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I thought it was a cool idea until about a week into it the damn thing decided I 'Had no internet connection' and refused to run even after a reboot and reinstall. Screw it, I'll get the version that I actually install and works fine....

Whats the diference between this one and the one released on July 14???

And If I have the invitation for the technical preview, I have this one too? or what?

This may be a stupid question, but has anyone found any explanation of what features may have been added in the 2010 version? I'm particularly interested in what's new in Access... I have looked all over and haven't been able to find out anything. I'm sure more information will come out as it gets closer to release, but I'm rather curious.

The only thing I've noticed so far is that they've added the ribbon interface to outlook's main window, and completely redone the "file" menu (aka the office button or something) on all office programs. However, I haven't used anything apart from word, excel and outlook very much.

I am member of Microsoft Connect, and got and inivataion through connect. So far I ahve used Word,Excel and Powerpoint and the preview looks great. I like the BackOffice Concept. One things nice about this technical Preview is that if you like a feature you can send a smile, and if you don't liek a feature or something is missing you can send a frown with the screen shot. This version of Office Looks better than 2007. Excel and Word handeled my large documetns better, and onenote, though this is my first time use of it, its great. Now to check Access 2010. One thing I am really going to check is how easy it is to crack the VBA password.

Owenw said,
It is particularly strange - it broke my laptop and I had to do a painful >1hr long system restore.

Oh my... That doesn't sound good at all... I sure hope that's fixed before release...

He's simply saying that there's a possibility that a leaked copy COULD have malware embedded, there's no need to be hostile.

I don't know for certain, but the likelihood is that given that the leaked preview was released quite a while ago, some things will have changed.

It's faster - x64 can handle 2x the throughput that 32-bit can handle. Also, 64-bit is good for situations where you have more than 3GB of RAM on your machine - if you have a 32-bit host it will only recognize between 3.25 and 4GB of RAM on 32-bit

If you have a 64-bit machine, take advantage of it now, as in the future, everything will be 64-bit only

Owenw said,
It's faster - x64 can handle 2x the throughput that 32-bit can handle. Also, 64-bit is good for situations where you have more than 3GB of RAM on your machine - if you have a 32-bit host it will only recognize between 3.25 and 4GB of RAM on 32-bit

If you have a 64-bit machine, take advantage of it now, as in the future, everything will be 64-bit only :)


That's not the point and isn't true either. 64bit addressing isn't 32 bits * 2.

MMaster23 said,


That's not the point and isn't true either. 64bit addressing isn't 32 bits * 2.


However, Office 2010 x64 is markedly faster than Office 2007 (x32) on the same setup (including Word and Outlook, the two least-likely Office applications to show improvement). If you tackle large documents or lots of e-mail, Office 2010 x64 is the Office you've been waiting for.