Office 2010 optimized for Windows 7

Since a technical preview version of Office 2010 leaked barely a day ago it seems to have spread to anyone and everyone, despite a limited official technical preview scheduled for July. We already knew that Office 2010 will ship in both 32-bit and 64-bit versions (and the technical preview was leaked in both these flavours) and earlier this week it was confirmed that it will run on Windows XP SP3, Windows Vista and Windows 7 as well.

Robert McLaws is one of the many who has downloaded and installed the leaked build on Windows 7, and has discovered that parts of the Office suite have been optimised for Windows 7 by utilising the new jump lists feature. Here you can see Outlook 2010 taking advantage of it by using a jump list to provide a list of useful tasks.


[Image source: Robert McLaws]

The jump list will surely come in handy by providing quick links to Outlook's four main functions - your email, calendar, contacts and tasks - and to create a new message or entry for each of these tools. By dragging a file from the jump list of another application onto the navigation pane in Outlook it automatically opens the compose email window with that file as an attachment. The taskbar icon for Outlook also shows you when you have have a new email message as you can see in this image, taken recently at the TechEd 2009 keynote.

[Image source: TechRadar]

From what we can tell, the jump lists of other programs in the Office 2010 will offer the usual list of recent and pinned files. If you are tempted to try out the leaked Office 2010 Technical Preview version then be aware: we've been tipped off that the build won't run as well as it should as it is still an earlier version of the code that will be used in the official Technical Preview which should be available in July.

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I need help. Does anyone run Hotmail in Outlook 2010? It needs that connector but it works only with 2007 Any ideas how to make it work?

Apps seem to have a fully completely customizable ribbon with any command addable/removable. ultimately putting to rest any menus/toolbars vs ribbon issues. 64-bit even has 64-bit VBA!! In 64-bit, Office Document Imaging/Scanning are missing (dunno about 32-bit), Visual Studio components are 32-bit. 2 new themes besides the one in the screenshot are there but only will be available beta 2 onwards. The Office menu button takes you to a different world that contains a glorified UI for newbies. PowerPoint has got cool modern looking transitions and effects. Outlook and PowerPoint starts up the slowest. As already known, every app including the underdog Publisher has been ribbonized. The 64-bit version also seems to have dropped the legacy Script Editor, Research Explorer bar for IE, Office Web Components etc stuff. VSTO 4.0 runtime is installed along with Office (finally!, thank you MS). There seems to be some "Office Sync Center" and "Business Connectivity Services" (for ppl to build OBAs). A smart tag for IM addresses is new. InfoPath seems to be split into 2 components (Designer and Editor-my guess is Editor will be free). Conditional sum wizard, lookup wizard are gone from Excel. Documentation is not yet in place. File formats can be blocked and unblocked from the UI (instead of registry).

Damn, the startup time is amazingly fast, much faster than Office 2007. But the UI is kinda disappointing, hope they will fix it later.

Totally agree , the startup is super-duper-bluper fast on my Windows 7 .

Using x64 Version of Office on my X64 Win 7 RC

Optimized? tats not called optimized. optimization means speed, no hangin, smooth ..,. blah blah blah, anyone can put jump list, in their own apps. how tuff is tat.

prabir said,
Optimized? tats not called optimized. optimization means speed, no hangin, smooth ..,. blah blah blah, anyone can put jump list, in their own apps. how tuff is tat.

It actually is optimized, the startup speed compared to office 2007 is a lot quicker.

From what we can tell, the jump lists of other programs in the Office 2010 will offer the usual list of recent and pinned files. If you are tempted to try out the leaked Office 2010 Technical Preview version then be aware: we've been tipped off that the [leaked] build won't run as well as it should as it is still an earlier version of the code that will be used in the official Technical Preview which should be available in July.

Quoted from the article with a minor change for clarification.

It runs slower than the official tech preview? Good! The leaked copy is already so much faster than 2007 on old processors. :P

At least for OneNote. It's awesome.

Does your Outlook 2010 have the feature where it recognizes names in an email and when you hover over them it shows the contact info??? I've seen that in screenshots but it's not in the leaked version

The title should read "Office 2010 takes advantage of Windows 7 new features"...

However, I'm sure Microsoft will optimize many things like performance and other things when run in Windows 7.

ajua said,
However, I'm sure Microsoft will optimize many things like performance and other things when run in Windows 7.


They should!, Powepoint is an example, I'm still dreaming with a Powerpoint using WPF or something similar.

I agree that this isn't really 'optimised' for Windows 7.
When I read the article title I thought that Office 2010 had better performance on Windows 7 than on Vista or XP.

It's still pretty sweet tho, I hope more developers take advantage of this...

Well it makes sense for Microsoft to optimise their software for the latest version of Windows. The final RTM build of Windows 7 will be out to the public by the time Office 2010 is released.

LiquidSolstice said,
Um.

Just because Vista doesn't have jumplists doesn't mean 2010 will perform worse on it.

Fail


True. Who said it would perform worse in Windows Vista? Simply because it's optimized for Windows 7 doesn't mean it'll perform better (as in faster). It means it'll make use of features in Windows 7 that aren't in Windows Vista or Windows XP. And one of those features is jump-lists.

artzm said,
@LiquidSolstice
It's definitely optimized to use features of Windows 7.

Yes, but it also works just as well as any previous Microsoft Office suite on Windows XP (SP3) and Windows Vista. It may even run faster on those operating systems for all anyone knows...

artzm said,
@LiquidSolstice
It's definitely optimized to use features of Windows 7.
Um.
Fail?

Unless you can point out how said optimization makes it work worse on Vista he's right.

Yea Outlook confuses me right now.

Oh, does your Outlook 2010 have the feature where it recognizes names in an email and when you click on them it shows the contact info??? I've seen that in screenshots but it's not in the leaked version

is "optmised" the word here? that's like saying that office 2007 is "opmitised" on vista because it uses aero. it's just the jumplists!!

Yes, it is the right word. You can't find jump-lists in Windows Vista or Windows XP. It's a feature unique to Windows 7. Office 2010 is "optimized" for Windows 7 because it's getting the most out of Windows 7. As for Aero in Windows Vista, that's merely a theme.

Brandon Live said,
I think they're referring to custom jump lists (with tasks like New Appointment, etc).


It's still not really optimisation, more taking advantage of features in a new OS and quite frankly, shouldn't we expect it to? I really don't see how this is news unless we're going see other programs being "optimised" for windows 7 on here..

Julius Caro said,
is "optmised" the word here? that's like saying that office 2007 is "opmitised" on vista because it uses aero. it's just the jumplists!!

Yes, the new jump list alone doesn't make it optimised.
However, it's only a Tech Preview, so there may come more, actual optimisations for Win7.

Mike said,
It's still not really optimisation, more taking advantage of features in a new OS and quite frankly, shouldn't we expect it to? I really don't see how this is news unless we're going see other programs being "optimised" for windows 7 on here..

It's news because it's new; something which hasn't been done in Office suite before. Isn't that one of the definitions of news? - something which is new and hasn't been done before? I think it is...

Calum said,
It's news because it's new; something which hasn't been done in Office suite before. Isn't that one of the definitions of news? - something which is new and hasn't been done before? I think it is...


Optimizations for a specific version of Windows are far from being new for Office; in fact, *every* version of Office for Windows has optimizations specific to the *flagship* flavor of Windows at the time. (This has, in fact, nearly gotten Microsoft in hot water more than once with the Justice Department; Microsoft's Information Worker business unit [which is directly responsible for Office] had been accused of using undocumented system calls in Office to execute those optimizations. That case fell apart when it was pointed out that not only were the system calls that Office used extremely well-documented, but that Microsoft didn't even wholly own the Foundation Classes on which the calls were based [back then, as is the case today, Microsoft is simply one party that has rights to the Windows Foundation Classes].) So it *has* been done before, and in Office; in fact, it's actually quite typical for Office.

Mike said,
It's still not really optimisation, more taking advantage of features in a new OS and quite frankly, shouldn't we expect it to? I really don't see how this is news unless we're going see other programs being "optimised" for windows 7 on here..

Aye! Look up the definition of "optimized". :P

Julius Caro said,
is "optmised" the word here? that's like saying that office 2007 is "opmitised" on vista because it uses aero. it's just the jumplists!!

isnt optimize "make better"? such a small feature doesnt necessarily make it better. "adapted to windows 7" or something like that is what im talking about. when I read "office 2010 optimized for windows 7" i understand that it runs better on windows 7, but i doubt that is the case. and by reading other comments i think some people agree with me.

PGHammer said,
Optimizations for a specific version of Windows are far from being new for Office...

I meant Microsoft Office has not taken advantage of the jump lists in Windows 7 before. It hasn't, right?

That's what I mean when I say this is news, because it is new and has never been done before.

Julius Caro said,
isnt optimize "make better"? such a small feature doesnt necessarily make it better. "adapted to windows 7" or something like that is what im talking about. when I read "office 2010 optimized for windows 7" i understand that it runs better on windows 7, but i doubt that is the case. and by reading other comments i think some people agree with me.

Whether people agree with you or not is irrelevant. Look up the definition of optimized. Changing something to make use of a feature in something else amounts to optimization.

geoken said,
Whether people agree with you or not is irrelevant. Look up the definition of optimized. Changing something to make use of a feature in something else amounts to optimization.

Considering that half the comments on this article are discussing wether or not the word is correct there, I'd say it is relevant.


1. To make as perfect or effective as possible.
2. Computer Science To increase the computing speed and efficiency of (a program), as by rewriting instructions.
3. To make the most of.


for #1, you can't measure perfectness on a computer program. for #2, that's not what the article is talking about. #3 would be the only one that would fit, but it's jumplists we're talking about, hardly something that would make office on windows7 better than on other windows.

besides, if we are in a "computer science" context, there's no point in using other meanings.

Julius Caro said,
Considering that half the comments on this article are discussing wether or not the word is correct there, I'd say it is relevant.


1. To make as perfect or effective as possible.
2. Computer Science To increase the computing speed and efficiency of (a program), as by rewriting instructions.
3. To make the most of.


for #1, you can't measure perfectness on a computer program. for #2, that's not what the article is talking about. #3 would be the only one that would fit, but it's jumplists we're talking about, hardly something that would make office on windows7 better than on other windows.

besides, if we are in a "computer science" context, there's no point in using other meanings.


A lot of words have multiple definitions. The use of the word "optimized" is correct since two of the definition fits. The use of jump-lists in Windows 7 makes Office 2010 "as effective as possible." Also, Office 2010 is making the most of Windows 7 by using a feature unique to Windows 7. I could even go as far as saying that using the jump-lists feature makes Office 2010 more efficient than its Windows Vista/XP counterparts.

I really disagree with the word "optimized" as well. It's misleading as apparently, that's not how many of us view it. Optimize to us says,"It runs faster and/or more efficiently." I guess clarity doesn't exactly matter though.

Not sure why Calum is arguing about it being newsworthy. Maybe some people may not find it to be that, but if you guys want to report on it, that's fine. My only beef is how you're going about saying it. Though, I guess if the title said,"Office 2010 Makes Use of Jumplists", people would probably say, "Well, spluh..." and move along.

It's no surprise that Office 2010 is optimized for Windows 7. In fact, I would've been surprised if Microsoft didn't optimize it. I'm sure we'll see more software taking advantage of the new features in Windows 7.

Anaron said,
It's no surprise that Office 2010 is optimized for Windows 7. In fact, I would've been surprised if Microsoft didn't optimize it. I'm sure we'll see more software taking advantage of the new features in Windows 7.

Yes, this happened a lot in Vista, I'm sure history will repeat itself, except Windows 7 has many new features for programs to be optimize for.

Anaron said,
It's no surprise that Office 2010 is optimized for Windows 7. In fact, I would've been surprised if Microsoft didn't optimize it. I'm sure we'll see more software taking advantage of the new features in Windows 7.


Each version of Office for Windows was optimized for the *flagship* Windows flavor at the time (Office 95 for Windows 95, Office 97 for NT 4.0, Office 2000 for Windows 2000, etc.); all the better to encourage *tag-team* deployments of Windows and Office together. This is not even CLOSE to being the first time that betas of Office and Windows have overlapped (the first Office 95 TAP consisted entirely of Windows 95 beta-testers). Therefore, the surprising thing would have been that Office 2010 were NOT optimized for Windows 7.

PGHammer said,
Each version of Office for Windows was optimized for the *flagship* Windows flavor at the time (Office 95 for Windows 95, Office 97 for NT 4.0, Office 2000 for Windows 2000, etc.); all the better to encourage *tag-team* deployments of Windows and Office together. This is not even CLOSE to being the first time that betas of Office and Windows have overlapped (the first Office 95 TAP consisted entirely of Windows 95 beta-testers). Therefore, the surprising thing would have been that Office 2010 were NOT optimized for Windows 7.

Ah, I see. I really didn't know that. It makes sense.

Definably a added bonus, I hope other apps like Windows Live Mail will eventually be using jump lists like outlook

Rev. said,
+1 Will other apps besides MS apps be able to take advantage of the jump list?

They should be able to. Otherwise I'm sure developers will kick up a storm about it I'm sure I heard something about an API being available, though I'm not 100% on that, sorry.

gamestargrinder said,
Definably a added bonus, I hope other apps like Windows Live Mail will eventually be using jump lists like outlook

windows live messenger already does, just the added "menu" is in start menu hover over it to see it

The jump list API is open and documented, all you have to hope for is that devs aren't lazy about it and use them when win7 is out.