Office 2010 UK pricing announced, some editions 35% more expensive than U.S.

Microsoft has unveiled the UK pricing for Office 2010 today and it's not good news for Brits wanting to get their hands on a copy of Microsoft's latest and greatest.

Pricing for some versions of Office 2010 in the UK is 35% more than prices in the US. Office Home and Business will be priced at £239.99 in the UK and $279 (£176) in the US. Although the US prices do not include local Taxes, the hike in prices is still substantial.

IT Pro questioned Office Product Manager Chris Adams over the prices. "There are different market dynamics - channel margins, for example, local market conditions, foreign exchange - that we need to take on board," he said.

Boxed copies of Office 2010 in the UK will be available at the following prices:

  • Office Home and Student - £109.99
  • Office Home and Business - £239.99
  • Office Professional - £429.99

Microsoft also said it will be offering Product Key Cards for customers who purchase new PCs from retailers. The Key Cards unlock a trial version of Office 2010 that is pre-loaded by OEMs onto PCs. Product Key Cards for Office 2010 in the UK will be available at the following prices:

  • Office Home and Student Key Card - £89.99
  • Office Home and Business Key Card - £189.99
  • Office Professional Key Card - £299.99

Microsoft revealed last month that customers who purchase Office 2007 between March 5, 2010 and September 30, 2010 will receive a free upgrade copy to Office 2010. Check out Neowin's top new features in Office 2010. Microsoft Office 2010 is expected to be generally available on June 15.

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J400uk said,
Is it not cheaper to buy Office 2007 in March then pick up the free upgrade to 2010? I can see Home and Student 2007 for £59.99 on Amazon.co.uk, thats nearly half the RRP of the equivelent 2010 SKU.

You can bet everything that during the 'upgrade' timeframe the prices will mysteriously inflate :(

With all the suing going on and restrictions/edits the UK and other countries demand from MS, it makes sense its more expensive.

Islander said,
So what, that's what it costs to translate the software.

Oh wait...

Well, the UK software is partially translated (e.g. color --> colour). :)

Kirkburn said,
Well, the UK software is partially translated (e.g. color --> colour). :)

ye, realy...

Edited by xn--bya, Feb 17 2010, 7:46pm :

still1 said,
Nice.....sad sometime brits has to pay extra for MS software.

Sometimes? Since when do we ever pay the same?

Almost all of MS operational costs, cost MORE in UK. Yet you are all astounded at how this evil US corporation would be so bold as to pass that cost off onto you.

Higher taxes, higher cost of advertisement, higher wages to pay for people who support MS operations in UK, higher level of government regulation of businesses (to enforce things that you like such as good return policies)... the list goes on...

You expect MS to just eat these costs? Get Real!

>Higher taxes, higher cost of advertisement, higher wages to pay for people who support MS operations in UK, higher level of government regulation of businesses (to enforce things that you like such as good return policies)... the list goes on...

And maybe MS is paying taxes in UK in the range of 50%....

kingco said,
>Higher taxes, higher cost of advertisement, higher wages to pay for people who support MS operations in UK, higher level of government regulation of businesses (to enforce things that you like such as good return policies)... the list goes on...

And maybe MS is paying taxes in UK in the range of 50%....

Exactly. There are all these hidden costs when doing business in any country. The price of the product has to reflect that. It is very likely that even though it is 35% more expensive than US, and they still make less of a profit from the UK market.

Guess I'll just use OpenOffice instead, don't need many of Office's features. I actually use Google Docs more than anything else atm.

hotdog963al said,
Guess I'll just use OpenOffice instead, don't need many of Office's features. I actually use Google Docs more than anything else atm.

At least for SpreadSheet, it is to far inferior to Excel.

bbfc_uk said,
Will Home and Student include Outlook instead of that pointless OneNote?!
I've never used it personally, but I've heard a lot of people swear by OneNote.

Outlook isn't really appropriate for Home and Students, because they generally do perfectly fine with free email clients.

People in the UK have to undertsand - you elected TWO socialist governments - one in Westminster and the other in Brussels. Socialist governments hammer businesses for tax revenues. Businesses then pass on teh costs to consumers. If you want socialism you're going to have to pay for it.

Get used to it. Or better, get rid of your socialist governments. There is no free lunch (or health service).

Historically prices have been high in Britain no matter which party is in power. Politics, as they say, is the entertainment division of industry. One difference between Brits and Americans is that Brits are apt to moan about prices where Americans - "The customer is king" - are apt to complain and lobby. Just trying haggling over price in the UK or asking if you can get a bulk discount!

British Prices include tax, so if you average out US sales tax at 10% (it varies from state to state) you get a clearer picture - but keep in mind that not all states charge sales tax.

When the Canon 7D DSLR first came out you had the absurd situation of Brits flying across to NY and buying it there, the pound was at that time a bit stronger against the dollar and the difference in price payed a large chunk of their return flight, a cheap holiday. That is of course illegal because they are avoiding paying her majesty's import duty, something they should be declaring on their customs forms on their return to Britain. I remember British consumers anger at the 7D pricing. Though prices of new technology drop, the difference is additionally compounded by a voucher/cash back culture in the US that Britain has only the flimsiest equivalent of.

Today, the price of the new and cheaper Canon 550D/Rebel T2i model with kit lens in the US is $899. The price in the UK is set to be £899! I am not making this up. Go and check. Adding 10% sales tax to the US price you get $988.99. Assuming dishonesty is rampant and people avoid customs tax, that price is great for the tourist industry in American but lousy for the British economy.

Technically, if you're a university student I would bet they'll be putting the 2010 version on "The Ultimate Steal" - www.theultimatesteal.co.uk

You can get a legal, full, professional copy of Office from there for like £40, so no point buying the student edition for £100 when you don't even get half the software.

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