Office for Mac 2011 screenshots, hands-on

BGR has an exclusive hands on with Microsoft Office for Mac 2011, with a nice gallery to boot. They take special notice of the general overhaul Microsoft gave the UI for this iteration, making people less dependent on the toolbar, and better incorporating the ribbon (introduced in Office 2007) into the new UI. Other functionalities, like macros for Excel, toolbox integration with multimedia tools like iPhoto, iTunes, Photo Booth, and Garage Band, are lauded. 

Image courtesy of BGR

The biggest problem with new suite is Outlook, according to BGR. While they believe that Outlook for Mac is the most robust email client for overall use, Microsoft did not score points in the user-friendly department. 

"It's definitely the best and most powerful email client we’ve ever used on OS X, but after using it for 10 minutes we honestly gave up on it. Why? Because it simply requires more work to get simple tasks done than on the Windows version. It sucks to say it, but given the choice between using the new Outlook for Mac and virtualizing Outlook for Windows, we’d go with the latter any day."

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41 Comments

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sopharine said,
Is this the first time ever Office on Windows actually looks better than on Mac?

Do you mean the opposite? Because Office on the Mac has always been crap to me. I never really used it, I booted it up in Parallels instead.

sopharine said,
Is this the first time ever Office on Windows actually looks better than on Mac?

Have you see Office 2010? it is a massive leap ahead of Office 2007. When Wave 4 of Live Essentials are released, along with other vendors have updated and Windows 7'ised their software, Windows 7 will as pretty as Mac OS X

rawr_boy81 said,
Windows 7 will as pretty as Mac OS X

Except for all those windows scattered throughout Windows 7 that still look like they come from Windows 2000, only now with an Aero border around it. Not to mention that most third-party developers couldn't care less about what their apps look like on Windows. I'm also enjoying those amazing 2 bit dotted lines Windows 7 uses for selections.

Edited by .Neo, Apr 24 2010, 12:17pm :

.Neo said,

Except for all those windows scattered throughout Windows 7 that still look like they come from Windows 2000, only now with an Aero border around it. Not to mention that most third-party developers couldn't care less about what their apps look like on Windows. I'm also enjoying those amazing 2 bit dotted lines Windows 7 uses for selections.

Meh, I'm caring less and less these days about look when you consider the lack of software optimised fully for Mac OS X; Flash 10.1 being the best example of half assed, half baked crap being pushed off as Mac OS X compatible software or the shoddy rubbish called Office 2008 whose only high not was the fact that it is Intel native. When you've put up with those issues for over 9 years, Windows 7 with all its faults looks very desirable.

Kudos to Microsoft and their devoted Mac development team.

Instead of forcing users to use MS technology or be 'windows minded' they go the extra mile to make a great Mac product once again.

Apart from the one failed shared code version of Mac Office from the 90s, Microsoft's Mac team are true Mac users and it shows in understanding the OS X platform and creating software made for a Mac.

It is both a good thing and a bit weird that there are Mac Office features and platform integration that can even make Windows users envious.

thenetavenger said,
Kudos to Microsoft and their devoted Mac development team.

Instead of forcing users to use MS technology or be 'windows minded' they go the extra mile to make a great Mac product once again.

Apart from the one failed shared code version of Mac Office from the 90s, Microsoft's Mac team are true Mac users and it shows in understanding the OS X platform and creating software made for a Mac.

It is both a good thing and a bit weird that there are Mac Office features and platform integration that can even make Windows users envious.

From what I understand the move to Mac OS X and the updating of the code base for Microsoft Office has allowed a lot more code to be shared between the Windows and Mac Office teams which hopefully will mean more or less feature parity.

Mac OS X and Windows are becoming more and more comparable to the point that before one could come up with legitimate list of benefits and weakness but the list is pretty short now with the only real reason to go for one over another would be personal taste rather than something objective.

Although it looks really nice, unless they have a good upgrade deal from 2008 Home and Student I will probably not be upgrading.

shozilla said,
I like the splash screens with blueprint background. I wish they do that for Windows version.

splash screens are beta too Look at the office logo

Dead'Soul said,

splash screens are beta too Look at the office logo

I know they are beta. I was saying I like their splash screens. Of course I know that they may change their splash screens before the final production.

shozilla said,
I know they are beta. I was saying I like their splash screens. Of course I know that they may change their splash screens before the final production.

Yeah, I like the splash screens, it has this industrial/"this application is for real' feeling about it

The Outlook icon looks really out of place; hopefully they'll be updating the Word and Excel icon as well

Udedenkz said,
I know that Office 2008 does not support formulas. Will Office 2011 also be a cut down version of Office 2010?

Yes, it supports equations just as Office 2007 and 2010 does on the PC
That made me a happy man.

Looking forward to this just because of better exchange support. I hope they improve outlook by the time this is released.

S.T.A.L.K.E.R. said,
im seeing a huge white space.
no screenshot

It was working a moment ago, just before my first reply. Something broke.

Edit: Now its working.

Edited by Grinch, Apr 23 2010, 7:00pm :

Dead'Soul said,
i dont like the design, not macish, looks like on mac themed XP

I know, right? It's like using iTunes for Windows. Guess you'll just have to buy a PC for the superior Office suite.

I won't say how but I have been playing with it for most of the week and I must say that it is light years ahead of office 08. It is great!

BlendedFrog said,
I won't say how but I have been playing with it for most of the week and I must say that it is light years ahead of office 08. It is great!

Isn't light-years a measure of distance, not time?

DarkNovaGamer said,
Isn't light-years a measure of distance, not time?
Yes. Saying, "something is some distance ahead," is a common figure of speech.


For example: "GMail is miles ahead of Yahoo! Mail."

pickypg said,
Yes. Saying, "something is some distance ahead," is a common figure of speech.


For example: "GMail is miles ahead of Yahoo! Mail."

Guess its just different around here, I usually hear people say something like "Bing is years ahead of Google".

DarkNovaGamer said,

Guess its just different around here, I usually hear people say something like "Bing is years ahead of Google".


Years ahead because it looks more modern...

DarkNovaGamer said,

Isn't light-years a measure of distance, not time?

Do we have to get litteral on here every time someone uses a figure of speech?

BlendedFrog said,
I won't say how but I have been playing with it for most of the week and I must say that it is light years ahead of office 08. It is great!

When in a race... a winner is usually a distance ahead of the loser/2nd/3rd place etc... so using distance is perfectly acceptable.

For example: "GMail is miles ahead of Yahoo! Mail."

Isn't it interesting that we can use time for a measurement of distance ("It's about a 3-hour drive from here") but we can't do the opposite, that is, distance for time. I mean, no one can say, "Man we've been waiting for like a 150 miles."

I don't know; the whole brushed metal look of Mac apps just looks a little too late 90s-ish to me.

devHead said,

Isn't it interesting that we can use time for a measurement of distance ("It's about a 3-hour drive from here") but we can't do the opposite, that is, distance for time. I mean, no one can say, "Man we've been waiting for like a 150 miles."

I don't know; the whole brushed metal look of Mac apps just looks a little too late 90s-ish to me.

distance in time is different...... because a distance travelled usually has a speed associated with it, which translates into time...

DarkNovaGamer said,

Isn't light-years a measure of distance, not time?

Indeed. It's miles away, it's miles ahead then. Same thing. Distance.

devHead said,
I don't know; the whole brushed metal look of Mac apps just looks a little too late 90s-ish to me.

Where do you see Brush Metal in Leopard and Snow Leopard? And in Office 2011?
I think you're a few years late, mate

And... late 90's? Look at Windows 98, I bet my life that you would have preferred a Brushed Metal interface back then instead of this crappy, boring, dead, plain gray Windows interface. But it wasn't invented yet