Official Way to Use Vista without Activation 120 Days

Official Way to Install and Use Windows Vista without Activation for Free for 120 Days

By default, Windows Vista can be installed, used and run without any license, product key or the need of activation for 30 days grace period, for purpose of trial or evaluation. Although Microsoft initially stressed that users should purchase a license with valid product key before the trial period expires, or else Windows Vista will lock into Reduced Functionality Mode. However, a "rearm" method has long since been discovered to be able to extend, or reset the remaining time for activation to another fresh 30 days, for up to 3 times.

Now Microsoft has confirmed that Windows Vista can be used and run for 120 days or 4 months (3 rearms), and extending the activation grace period is not a violation of the Vista End User License Agreement (EULA). All versions of Vista include Windows Vista Ultimate allow a 30-day free period without activation, except the corporate-oriented Vista Enterprise, which supports only a three-day trial.

To extend, reset or restart the initial OOB grace period of Windows Vista to another 30 days, use the following steps:

  1. Click on Vista Start button and key in Cmd in Start Search box.
  2. Press on Ctrl-Shift-Enter to open Command Prompt with administrative credentials (equivalent to "Run as Administrator").
  3. In the Command Prompt, type the following command and press Enter when done: slmgr -rearm or you can use sysprep /generalize
  4. Reboot the computer.
  5. Rearm again when the remaining activation grace period timer counts down to 0 days.
Rearm option resets the computer's activation timer and reinitializes some activation parameters.

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26 Comments

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and extending the activation grace period is not a violation of the Vista End User License Agreement (EULA)

Is there a source to this quote?

I mean, is this really true, or is this simply a bug someone is exploiting?

I just re-armed because I was at 0 days on rc2 and my copy of ultimate is supposed to arrive within 2 days. It was tough though. I downloaded it, then had to right-click in the internet explorer windows, click "View Source", then click open in notepad to get to the file to do the re-arm, but it worked perfectly and I have another 30 days (even though I don't need that many )

Here's my question.. I have Windows Vista Business. Say that I want to run Windows Vista Ultimate. With this trick, I could clean install windows, not enter a key, choose Ultimate as my operating system, and then use Windows Vista Ultimate with full functionality for up to 4 months. After 4 months, you could just back up your system and your favorite apps, clean install Windows again with your Windows Vista Home Premium/Business, not enter a key, choose Ultimate, and have Ultimate for another 4 months!

Am I right? I think it's almost worth it. Every 4 months might be a good time to give your computer a clean install anyway. This way you get all the Ultimate features and Ultimate Extras!

Well this software is not a try before you buy thing. The article should say Grace Period instead of Trial Period in the top portion.

My machine went into reduced functionality mode and has been operating in this mode for the last two months. At first glance, the average user would think that MS really dotted their I's and crossed their T's, but you can easily circumvent the "reduced functionality" mode with some ease if you're willing to explore.

Some things I have noticed and haven't been able to remove restrictions is that in this reduced mode, the system will only acknowledge 384 MB of memory. After Windows is loaded, you don't have much memory do to do any media playing except for audio.

Second, the machine will auto log you out, interrupting anything you may be doing, in 45 mins to 1 hour after logging in under "reduced functionality", so you have to keep an eye on time if you're doing something important.

Some people may wonder why I put up with this when my copy of Vista is legal, and the simple truth is that I plan to build an entirely new system and don't want to waste an activation...

How is this a "free trial" when you have to purchase the software? Its not like if you don't like it you can return it. Most, if not all, stores will not take back open software.

RangerLG said,
How is this a "free trial" when you have to purchase the software? Its not like if you don't like it you can return it. Most, if not all, stores will not take back open software.

You need to think more laterally ...

In the case of windows you dont pay for the media or the copy of windows you pay for the licence.

Your free to borrow and install any copy of Windows from any CD including ones you have "Copied" or "borrowed" off a mate. It only becomes piracy when you enter an illegal product key or hack the product key / activation system.

Piracy

Piracy

Piracy

Piracy

Piracy

Piracy

Oh btw here is this official loophole that allows you to use our OS for 120 days without a key.

Piracy

Piracy

Piracy

I love Microsoft.

That is alright, I noticed Vista Home Premium Academic Upgrade also only has a 3 day grace period as well. However, considering how cheap it is (compared to the other versions) I'm not complaining

"extending the activation grace period is not a violation of the Vista End User License Agreement (EULA)"

If you haven't actually bought Vista, would it matter if you were violating the EULA?