One year on: Windows 7 now on 93% of new PCs, 240 Million Licenses Sold

Microsoft said on Thursday that Windows 7 is running on 93% of new consumer PCs and has over 17% global OS market share.

Windows 7 was released a year ago tomorrow, on October 22, 2009. The OS originally released to manufacturing over a year ago. Microsoft announced that Windows 7 is the fastest selling operating system in history, selling over 240 million licenses to date. The company is projected to sell 300 million by the end of 2010.

Microsoft's success with Windows 7 began before the product was even widely available. Released in October 2009, the operating system has received praise from consumers, businesses and the media. In November 2009, Windows 7 managed to surpass Apple's Snow Leopard market share in just two weeks. In early February it was revealed that Windows 7 had reached 10% market share in just three months.

Windows 7 has also driven an uptake of 64-bit computing. According to ChangeBASE research, conducted with senior IT decision makers, more than 65% of businesses hoped to migrate to Windows 7 within 12 months of its release. Over 50% of those migrating will be choosing the 64-bit route. Microsoft confirmed in July that nearly half of all Windows 7 PCs run 64-bit versions.

Screenshots of a Windows 7 post-RTM build showed up on the web in February, fueling speculation that Microsoft is compiling early Windows 8 builds. The successor to Windows 7 will likely be available in 2011 as an ex-Microsoft worker penned July 2011 as the RTM date for Windows 8. Microsoft is expected to build a 'Windows Store' app store into Windows 8 and Kinect-like functionality.

Microsoft is currently readying its first Service Pack for Windows 7. A public beta version was made available recently with a final release expected in the first quarter of next year.

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I'm curious how many percent other operating systems holds. I've starting to see some manufacturers sell Linux to the general public - which I think is interesting...

Tpiom said,
I'm curious how many percent other operating systems holds. I've starting to see some manufacturers sell Linux to the general public - which I think is interesting...

Some are starting to shy away from it. I believe that HP has been having issues with it so they removed the option from their site. But you can still order computers with Ubuntuu but I think you have to call them on the phone to do it.

I wish that MS just went with 2 skus. Windows Corp & Windows Home. No upgrade, No Premium, No Ultimate. If you want extended features go to marketplace.microsoft.com and buy them. One sku to rule them all.

Ummm Microsoft Security Essentials is the free AV for Windows 7. They wont add it to the base OS for legal reasons. Sad really.

rrode74 said,
Ummm Microsoft Security Essentials is the free AV for Windows 7. They wont add it to the base OS for legal reasons. Sad really.

I know, damn anti-trust. I wish MS could combine PDF readers, anti-virus, etc.. into the OS . Because of this, I was surprised that with W7 you can burn ISOs from it without installing anything more..

Unfortunately it's necessary, as when Microsoft included technologies like Java is used an out of date version and with Internet Explorer they killed of competition in the browser market and ignored standards compliance - it severely crippled competition. Now they've stripped out Movie Maker, Messenger, Mail, etc but provide them free to anyone that wants them. Now they have to actually make people want them, instead of just relying on the fact that they're going to get used.

Like theyarecomingforyou says, it's for the best.

I actually use MSE, but I'm glad it's not included! That way you have to choose your anti-virus program - pick one that suits you, instead of just going with the default: IE is a good example of this.

I really hate when OS/games/programs include stuff you do not want, and you've to uninstall all of it later.

well i wish they add the ability to choose what to install

something like typical and custom that would suite me well

and in custom you can choose what to install and remove etc.. it will give more control

DaRkMaDnEsS said,
well i wish they add the ability to choose what to install

something like typical and custom that would suite me well

and in custom you can choose what to install and remove etc.. it will give more control

They could always add a MS Suite of tools dvd, including MSE, Windows Live and other applications.

But I think, that with the increased availability of UEFI boards, we may finally be able to ditch physical media installation (it could be available through download installation)

theyarecomingforyou said,
Unfortunately it's necessary, as when Microsoft included technologies like Java is used an out of date version and with Internet Explorer they killed of competition in the browser market and ignored standards compliance - it severely crippled competition. Now they've stripped out Movie Maker, Messenger, Mail, etc but provide them free to anyone that wants them. Now they have to actually make people want them, instead of just relying on the fact that they're going to get used.

Um, this is almost the opposite of what happened with Java. Microsoft's JVM was faster and had features Sun's didn't. It was the OS specific features and being faster that POed Sun.

Other companies also had OS specific features in their Java VM (Apple, IBM, etc), but since Microsoft was in full support behind Java with development tools for Java and the largest development community, Sun felt it was important to keep control of Java and feared Microsoft's influence would hurt the platform.

So they sued MS, won, and THAT is when the MS JVM was outdated, as they were no longer allowed to update it outside of bug fixes, and this is why Microsoft stopped installing it with Windows, which totally destroyed any hope that Java would be the success it was supposed to be. (In the Windows world there were more Java developers and Java development before the Sun v MS lawsuit than they are today.)

Also the thing about IE standards, that is really not the case as well. IE came from a time when Netscape 3.0 ruled the earth and people were using dial up modems. IE 4 was a success because it didn't strictly ENFORCE html rules, and when the page came up with a missing end table tag, it went ahead a displayed the table anyway. So users on crap connections and people viewing poorly designed websites still got to see the content, where Netscape users saw a blank page.

Web standards are NOT as simple as people think, and most of the even the ones 'accepted' as standard are not finalized or standard yet even today. IE was designed with proposed standards, and some of them were not accepted. People forget that a lot of Web standards were designed by the IE team, and Microsoft employees. Instead they focus on the proposed standards in IE that were rejected.

It wasn't until later with IE6 and IE7 that Microsoft failed to implement a lot of the trends of web content and standards that reall did suck and hurt the web.

rrode74 said,
Ummm Microsoft Security Essentials is the free AV for Windows 7. They wont add it to the base OS for legal reasons. Sad really.

I tend to side with the Paul Thurrott opinion on MSE: fundamental OS security features, including recognition and prevention of malware, should be a part of the operating system. That it's the job of the OS to be secure, and having malware detection software is far more effective than patches on MS Update.

It should not be considered anti-competitive for an OS developer to add security features to their OS, and if that means destroying the anti-virus market in the process, we'll just have to deal with it, because keeping the two markets separate is bad for users and bad for the internet.

thenetavenger said,

Um, this is almost the opposite of what happened with Java. Microsoft's JVM was faster and had features Sun's didn't. It was the OS specific features and being faster that POed Sun.

Other companies also had OS specific features in their Java VM (Apple, IBM, etc), but since Microsoft was in full support behind Java with development tools for Java and the largest development community, Sun felt it was important to keep control of Java and feared Microsoft's influence would hurt the platform.

So they sued MS, won, and THAT is when the MS JVM was outdated, as they were no longer allowed to update it outside of bug fixes, and this is why Microsoft stopped installing it with Windows, which totally destroyed any hope that Java would be the success it was supposed to be. (In the Windows world there were more Java developers and Java development before the Sun v MS lawsuit than they are today.)

Also the thing about IE standards, that is really not the case as well. IE came from a time when Netscape 3.0 ruled the earth and people were using dial up modems. IE 4 was a success because it didn't strictly ENFORCE html rules, and when the page came up with a missing end table tag, it went ahead a displayed the table anyway. So users on crap connections and people viewing poorly designed websites still got to see the content, where Netscape users saw a blank page.

Web standards are NOT as simple as people think, and most of the even the ones 'accepted' as standard are not finalized or standard yet even today. IE was designed with proposed standards, and some of them were not accepted. People forget that a lot of Web standards were designed by the IE team, and Microsoft employees. Instead they focus on the proposed standards in IE that were rejected.

It wasn't until later with IE6 and IE7 that Microsoft failed to implement a lot of the trends of web content and standards that reall did suck and hurt the web.

^this!

Microsoft should add a ballot screen for antivirus when the user starts Windows 8 for the first time. Slightly annoying, but I think this would be a good way to kinda minimize malware spread. That's just wishful thinking, though. Everyone's busy fighting the browser wars. :\

Pharos said,
Microsoft should add a ballot screen for antivirus when the user starts Windows 8 for the first time. Slightly annoying, but I think this would be a good way to kinda minimize malware spread. That's just wishful thinking, though. Everyone's busy fighting the browser wars. :\

Malware prevention should not be a competitive market. If anything needs to be 'open' and have a standardized, globally maintained database, it's AV software. Screw ballot screens; integrate MSE and push for a massive community maintained malware database.

Pharos said,
Microsoft should add a ballot screen for antivirus when the user starts Windows 8 for the first time. Slightly annoying, but I think this would be a good way to kinda minimize malware spread. That's just wishful thinking, though. Everyone's busy fighting the browser wars. :\

I think this is an excellent idea, allow 3rd part AV providers to add their product to the list - app store style, and give the user a decision to make, which also includes the free options (MSE, AVG etc.).

The trouble with this is the deals OEM's have with big AV vendors, they wouldn't like to be in a list when a user starts, especially a list containing a free option!

If MS do this then there'll be trouble a brewin somewhere....

I'm just wishing that MS get into the slate game and set free a more multitouch friendly Win7 version so HP or others give us a slate, but I think that is more likely that happens with win8.

Windows 8 being due what feels like so soon before mass adoption corporately of Windows 7 seems like a mistake. Also, personally I don't want to update again so soon

osm0sis said,
Windows 8 being due what feels like so soon before mass adoption corporately of Windows 7 seems like a mistake. Also, personally I don't want to update again so soon

give the guys that still left out with Vista/xp a chance to upgrade

240 mil? What of the other 6 BILLION people of Earth?. To be precise, that's even less than the population of the United States. I'm not impressed.

Mike Frett said,
240 mil? What of the other 6 BILLION people of Earth?. To be precise, that's even less than the population of the United States. I'm not impressed.

What do you find impressive, Mac's 3% market share after 10 years? Linux's 1% after 15 or so years? There are only about 1.2B to 2B computers are out there. Getting on 20% of them in one year is highly impressive. No other OS in history has ever come close to selling 240M copies, or even getting 240M installs for free OSes, in one year, so I think it is impressive.

I was about to say that it hasn't been technically one year since Win7 release .. but forgot Tom's from the UK so it is Oct 22 over there

its a year old from a retail POV, businesses have had it a lot longer, pity the roll-out/migration/profile cloning issue is interfering with corporate uptake.

240 million licenses sold. If you multiply that just for upgrades only which each upgrade was $199...that gives you a total of 48 billion dollars for Microsoft...just in upgrades alone.

That's insane....and that's not including the licenses for full versions and corporate and OEMs.

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