'Open source' IE patch withdrawn for further patching

The third-party 'open source' patch for Internet Explorer that we told you about earlier today, contains more than a few potentially nasty surprises. As we noted, German tech site Heise had already warned of dangerous buffer overflows. Openwares.org, a month-old site which boasts "Software is free" today published source code and a binary executable purporting to fix a loophole in Internet Explorer for Windows. It's unusual, but not unprecedented, for third parties to issue their own fixes for Microsoft's exploit-riddled browser. But Heise advises that this patch could be more trouble than it's worth, and the fix has already been taken in for some maintenance.

"This patch addresses a vulnerability in Microsoft Internet Explorer that could allow Hackers and con-artists to to display a fake URL in the address and status bars. The vulnerability is caused due to an input validation error, which can be exploited by including the "%01" and "%00" URL encoded representations after the username and right before the "@" character in an URL," according to a release note accompanying the patch. Unfortunately, the authors of the patch also enabled a Windows Registry key used by spyware. IEmsg.dll. "When we're absulotly [sic] sure that the code is bulletproof we'll re-release it," says Openwares's forum administrator.

News source: The Register

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