OpenOffice 3.0 RC1

OpenOffice.org is an open-source, multiplatform and multilingual office suite comparable with MS Office.

It is compatible with all other major office suites and is free to download, use, and distribute. It was previously known as StarOffice before it became an open-source project. OpenOffice comes with OpenWriter - a word processor, OpenCalc - a spreadsheet and OpenImpress - a presentational package.

  • The first office suite to use the new OASIS OpenDocument format, the future-proof international standard for office software
  • Easy to install, with a whole new look and feel, matched to the type of computer in use
  • More intuitive, more easy to use than ever, with a host of new usability features
  • Complete with Base: an easy-to-use database manager with a fully integrated database
  • Compatible with other software packages - now understands even obscure and rarely used features in major competitors.
You may download OpenOffice.org completely free of any licence fees, use it for any purpose - private, educational, government and public administration, commercial - and pass on copies free of charge to family, friends, students, employees, etc.

News source: FileHippo
Download: OpenOffice 3.0 RC1
View: OpenOffice website

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

OneCare places 16th in antivirus test, 13th in spyware.

Next Story

Stuck on IE6? Gmail's got your back.

25 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

OpenOffice.org is an open-source, multiplatform and multilingual office suite comparable with MS Office.

The Joke of the YEAR!! only extremely mad talk like this...hahahahaha....

(Faisal Islam said @ #16)
OpenOffice.org is an open-source, multiplatform and multilingual office suite comparable with MS Office.

The Joke of the YEAR!! only extremely mad talk like this...hahahahaha....

lol what they mean is:

"OpenOffice.org is an open-source, multiplatform and multilingual office suite comparable with MS Office 97"

For older systems, I recommend older versions of Office.

Office XP starts right up on my Pentium MMX w/ 96 Megs RAM (ThinkPad 560X), but you could take a nap waiting for OpenOffice 1.x or 2.x to open.

I think more needs to be done on the performance end rather than updating it with a few pretty icons and some new features. I like the icon set but the sluggishness compared to MS Office is keeping me from using it.

I've tried to give Open Office a fair go, but it's like been transported back to Office 2000! and all they seem to have done is change the icons...so it's more like Office XP now :P I've been spoilt by Office 2007's ribbon interface, I love it. Open Office does a good job for what I does, I just can't stand the GUI and it looks extra hideous (and out of place) in Vista. That is what I think anyway, take with a grain of salt.

Seems like I tried this again right after I saw the last update to it. Since when does thing run as a service automatically?

I HATE that!!

hmm, i tried this and dont like it
Office 2k7's so easy to use and its so fast
and i dont htink you can outdo the 10+ years MS and spent on office
though i think for free its really good

slower than my ms office 2007 though. My really low end system for word-processing copes better with word 2007 than the openoffice writer 3. weird.

What about an OUTLOOK clone, or at least an OWA-compatible client like Evolution for Linux???

(Evolution sucks on Windows).

If this so called "Office" replacement actually had something to replace Outlook (or Entourage), then it would actually be a real option for those who use Office.

(DaDog V12 said @ #4.2)
Why not use Mozilla's Thunderbird. This might be unrelated but it does work very well.

Thunderbird doesn't support OWA or Exchange.

(Xenomorph said @ #4.5)

If you bothered reading the article you linked, it describes how to set Thunderbird up to work with IMAP.

IMAP isn't the same as Exchange or OWA, especially if your Exchange server isn't configured to even allow IMAP connections.


I know IMAP isn't the same as Exchange or OWA, but you were claiming that Thunderbird doesn't support Exchange when in actuality, it's the other way around: Exhange has to be configured for IMAP before it can support Thunderbird. Remember, servers support clients, not the other way around! So, I'm still calling bullhockey on your comment.

(Airlink said @ #4.6)

I know IMAP isn't the same as Exchange or OWA, but you were claiming that Thunderbird doesn't support Exchange when in actuality, it's the other way around: Exhange has to be configured for IMAP before it can support Thunderbird. Remember, servers support clients, not the other way around! So, I'm still calling bullhockey on your comment. :rolleyes:


Evolution can connect to Outlook Web Access. IMAP doesn't need to be configured at all to "support" anything. You don't have to configure Exchange to support Evolution (or Entourage). Exchange uses its special moon format, and Thunderbird doesn't support it (but Evolution does, but that sucks on Windows).

Does version 3.0 have real-time grammar checking now? A while back I decided to see of OpenOffice would be a decent alternative to Microsoft Office for myself, and I removed it as soon as I saw it lacked that basic feature.

Could someone be please more generic on describing the new features of OO.o?

"Future-Proof" as in LP, Cassettes, CDs, and DVDs i am guessing.

The "future-proof" part means that there will always be a way to access docs in the OpenDocument format in the future, because the spec is 100% open. Compare this with, say, a Word 97 docs: already, recent versions of MSOffice are less likely to open them faithfully, and in the future compatibility with such old versions will be broken completely. Sooner or later you'll be required to use those newer versions: Office 97 does not even install properly on XP, so your OS upgrade will see to that, if the necessity to read the Word 2007 docs your business contacts are sending you doesn't. At that point, if you've not found a way to export them safely, your documents are now as much use as a chocolate teapot. If you'd bought an intermediate version (say, Office XP) you could probably transition the docs up to 2007+ supported format, but if you haven't, then you've a problem because Microsoft won't sell it to you anymore.

Or (less likely, perhaps) MS goes titsup after one too many antitrust shaftings and there is no new version, and they're too busy in bankruptcy court to do anything about your now-obsolete documents, as if they cared anyway. A competitor with their own format gradually rises to fill the vacuum, but they can't help you with your old'n'busted docs either because MS never revealed how.

Back to OpenDocument. As an open specification, it will always be possible for software to be made that can render its documents with 100% fidelity. Its future is not tied to the fortunes or whims of a single vendor. I'd like to say it's as simple as that, but of course it's not; OpenDocument could become obsolete too, for various reasons (the main one being loss of interest by its group of corporate backers). If that happens, it's all very well the docs being theoretically 100% readable, but that's f-all use to the masses if nobody writes the software to do it any more.

But I'm not that pessimistic. OpenDocument right now is a young beast, still lacking in many features and an implementation that really gives MSOffice a run for its money. It will get better, though - it's in a better position than MSOffice to respond to the desires of the market, and MS despite their best efforts have actually helped it in some ways. Even if another format pops up in the future that eclipses both ODF and whatever format MSOffice is using that week, as long as it too is open, some talented and motivated coders out there will do that work and make conversion possible - from ODF, at least.

The comparison is like the last 2 on your list, CDs and DVDs. CDs are a fully open format (AFAIK), so anyone can keep making CD players forever if they have a market for it. The CSS encryption and region-coding on DVDs, however, are proprietary (again, AFAIK), so you can only keep making DVD players as long as the IP-holder licenses those technologies to you.

The user interface still needs more of a facelift though. It's a great work-towards what will one day be great, easy to use and professional, but at the moment it's still more ClarisWorks 4 than MS Office 2003.