OpenOffice gets most of its downloads from Windows users

OpenOffice is the open source counterpart to Microsoft Office so you might expect to see it used more by Linux-based PC users. Now it turns out that may not really be the case. According to a report from NetworkWorld, 87 percent of the downloads for the new version of OpenOffice have come from Windows PCs. 11 percent come from Mac computers and just two percent have been downloaded by Linux PCs.

The report was based on statistics from Apache, which took over the management of OpenOffice development in 2011 from Oracle. However, some Linux users feel the statistics are not quite accurate; some of them may download or receive OpenOffice from another location. Others believe that a recent offshoot of OpenOffice, LibreOffice, has gained in popularity among Linux users.

In a recent blog post, Apache showed a timeline of the development of OpenOffice since it took over its management. The post stated:

As the timeline shows, most of our attention on the project has been spent on community building and infrastructure migration efforts. We're not engaging in a race to see how fast we can come out with a release, or to show how quickly we can crank out minor releases.

Apache now completely hosts the OpenOffice download site, after shutting down the legacy servers in March that were still being used at Oracle.

Source: NetworkWorld

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43 Comments

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OO comes installed by default with all the major linux distros, Also why would anyone go to their website to download it on linux when a specially packaged version for that distro will be in it's software repo.

these java office suites are such a joke. its slow and ugly,just like anything associated with linux. ill stick to real professional software thank you.

vcfan said,
these java office suites are such a joke. its slow and ugly,just like anything associated with linux. ill stick to real professional software thank you.

You think Windows isn't slow and ugly? Apparently you and I have had different experiences in the Linux world, because I have had nothing but good experiences with most distributions. The new Ubuntu is bloated as hell, but other than that they've all been much faster and more stable than any version of Windows out there.

Most Linux distros have made the switch to LibreOffice. It's installed by default in Ubuntu, and available in the repos for most mainstream distributions.

Most of the Linux distros switched from automatically installing OpenOffice to LibreOffice last year during the break from the Oracle-distributed program. There's little reason to download another office suite that is almost exactly the same as what comes with the distro (and until Apache released version 3.4 of OpenOffice earlier this month, there wasn't a new version available for over a year...) Plus most of the press that came out after Oracle acquired Sun and OpenOffice seemed to encourage people to switch to the "free" LibreOffice suite instead.

Realistically there's a number of excellent free or low-cost alternatives to Microsoft Office and unless you're a student or educator who can get a cheaper version of Mircosoft's product or you just feel more comfortable with a "real" copy of Microsoft Office you probably will find them more than suitable for everyday use. I've personally used IBM's Lotus Symphony 3.0, Softmaker's Office 2008, Ashampoo's Office 2010, Kingsoft Office 2012 as well as both OpenOffice and LibreOffice on my Windows 7 systems and each of them are worth looking at.

Just because Microsoft dominates the market doesn't mean that it's the only way to go - I used Office since version 3.0 when I was working for corporate America and after paying for numerous upgrades to both my Windows & Mac platforms there's little reason for me to pay premium prices for something that I really don't need.

Actually the data suggests a different conclusion than made by this article.

First, ask yourself, what percentage of desktop PC's run Linux?

If you look at the available data (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U..._share_of_operating_systems) you would say 1-2%.

So if preferences for Windows and Linux users were exactly the same, you would expect each group to download Apache OpenOffice in numbers proportionate to their desktop share. That is what the Apache numbers show.

So, if LibreOffice pre-installs repository inclusion have any appreciable impact on the download numbers, it would lead the OpenOffice numbers to be lower than the overall Linux desktop share. Isn't that clear? But the numbers don't show that, do they?

Hey. HEY. STOP THAT. Don't look at the source data. You're only supposed to care about conclusions other people have already drawn without questioning whether they accurately represent the data!

/Haven't you heard? iPhone users get more sex than Android users!!!1


OpenOffice is the open source counterpart to Microsoft Office so you might expect to see it used more by Linux-based PC users

No, we use LibreOffice. OpenOffice is Oracle's. Everyone hates Oracle so...

simplezz said,

No, we use LibreOffice. OpenOffice is Oracle's. Everyone hates Oracle so...

I'm pretty sure OpenOffice is Apache's now

PotatoJ said,
How many Linux users download directly from OpenOffice.org? I would think most would just get it from the software repository of their distribution.

A lot of distro's prepackage libreOffice so even that doesn't happen.

PotatoJ said,
How many Linux users download directly from OpenOffice.org? I would think most would just get it from the software repository of their distribution.

getting it from outside the repositories is just asking for trouble.

And how many of those downloads were to try it out before purchasing a better product (Office) and uninstalling OpenOffice. I've been there more than once myself. OpenOffice just doesn't cut it...

Also, there are still Windows users that don't have access to Microsoft Office or that have no use for Outlook (an included e-mail program is, after, the biggest lack of both OpenOffice or LibreOffice). I *personally* have recommended OpenOffice if you don't need an e-mail program - and that is to Windows users. The very reason I don't use OpenOffice/LibreOffice on Windows is due to my using Outlook for e-mail on Windows; I do, however, use OpenOffice/LibreOffice when running a Linux distribution (in a VM).

Most linux distros use libreOffice. They also use repositories. So I'm actually surprised that they get any downloads from linux users

In other news: iMovie users most likely to use a Mac and later tonight we find out that 100% of Siri users have iPhones

soldier1st said,

and most of the servers are run with Linux. heck even MS uses them.

your point?? here we're talking of home/office PC's, not servers..

soldier1st said,

and most of the servers are run with Linux. heck even MS uses them.

Yeah because they are cheap not because they are better. Any sane company would use Windows before Linux because of all the advantages it has to offer

Microsoft technologies are far superior to anything linux has to offer.
For example PHP is a nightmare compared to ASP.

You really have to hate yourself to prefer Linux over Windows. Most Linux users think they are cool because they have to do all kind of crazy stuff to get something to work IMO that's just ****ing stupid.

Edited by PmRd, May 27 2012, 3:08am :

PmRd said,

Yeah because they are cheap not because they are better. Any sane company would use Windows before Linux because of all the advantages it has to offer

It's cheaper and a hell of a lot more customizable than Windows could ever hope to be. That's why Google, Facebook, Yahoo!, and the vast majority of supercomputers run Linux almost exclusively.
PmRd said,

Microsoft technologies are far superior to anything linux has to offer.
For example PHP is a nightmare compared to ASP.

Technically Linux is just a kernel. It can run ASP.NET and ASP.NET MVC pretty nicely via Mono.

MS Lose32 said,

Technically Linux is just a kernel. It can run ASP.NET and ASP.NET MVC pretty nicely via Mono.

Yeah a half-working version of it. And Linux being more customizable then Windows is bull****. There's nothing that Linux can do that Windows can't

Wake up, if you are using OO.org, most of the developers created the document foundation and made libreoffice, a fork of openoffice. That's the reason no nobody on Linux uses openoffice

zikalify said,
Wake up, if you are using OO.org, most of the developers created the document foundation and made libreoffice, a fork of openoffice. That's the reason no nobody on Linux uses openoffice

That is a correct statement. same as why sun java was removed from the repositories and more emphasis was placed on OpenJDK.

Probably because MS does such a terrible marketing job with the amazing and free Office online, that people still don't know they can use Office for free. MS marketing is so bad it's not even funny. Nokia needs to take over all of it. I have people ask me EVERY SINGLE DAY if the Lumia 900 that I am holding is the one that is in that "cell phone beta test" commercial. That's marketing.

lol, I get the same thing, but for some reason instead of beta test, one guy said data base. "is that the new phone on that data base commercial?" It took me a minute to figure out what he was talking about.

jimmyfal said,
Probably because MS does such a terrible marketing job with the amazing and free Office online, that people still don't know they can use Office for free. MS marketing is so bad it's not even funny. Nokia needs to take over all of it. I have people ask me EVERY SINGLE DAY if the Lumia 900 that I am holding is the one that is in that "cell phone beta test" commercial. That's marketing.

Yeah but office online barely has any features, honestly. Openoffice may be less professional than the paid version of office but it is certainly more professional than the free online (laggy) version of office.

still1 said,
isnt that Approximately the share of OS market share?? that make perfect sense.
It shows you must not rely on one platform, people who speaks more than one language are smarter than those who use just one, same goes for computer users those who use more than one OS are smarter so they know what is actually going on and they choose libreoffice. Open-office was dead for long time i don't know if revival is going to help much they have lost most of their users.

sat2012 said,
It shows you must not rely on one platform, people who speaks more than one language are smarter than those who use just one, same goes for computer users those who use more than one OS are smarter so they know what is actually going on and they choose libreoffice. Open-office was dead for long time i don't know if revival is going to help much they have lost most of their users.

I've met some pretty stupid bilingual people..

sat2012 said,
may be for language but not for computing

I think you just want that to be true, but you can go anywhere in the world and find people who use more than one OS and wouldn't be able to install a printer if their life depended on it.

There's also the desperate sadness of people who think Haiku is ever going to become anything. Or the fact that moms and dads are using Android handsets, and are quite technically 'Linux users' as a result. And ones tied to a Java-based ecosystem, as well.

Yet there are tons of dim-witted Android users out there. You could argue that's because Android is a mainstream consumer derivative of Linux, but that was Linux's goal all along, eh? If your point is that people who go out of their way to learn niche computing environments are more skilled, you're more likely to inch toward accuracy. But simply qualifying your argument with "uses more than one OS" isn't going to cut it.

yeah, well, bottom line is most linux users don't do anything useful on their computers, so that makes total sense. They just love it because they can compile their own operating system/modules and they think that makes them uber programmers/gods. Not because its a usable platform.

dvb2000 said,
yeah, well, bottom line is most linux users don't do anything useful on their computers, so that makes total sense. They just love it because they can compile their own operating system/modules and they think that makes them uber programmers/gods. Not because its a usable platform.

You obviously don't know what your talking about. Each platform has it's pros and cons.

soldier1st said,

You obviously don't know what your talking about. Each platform has it's pros and cons.

And you obviously don't have a sense of humor...