Opera becomes the first browser on Mac App Store

Opera today announced that it became the first web browser available in Apple's Mac App Store, the online distribution system set to play a key part in Mac OS X Lion. Having it take this long from the store's opening to finally have a browser available is incredible, and it's unclear as the whether the hold up has been on Apple's side or the developers' side.

Previous rejections from Apple's iOS App Store have ludicrously rejected any applications that "duplicate functionality" provided by built-in apps, stretching this definition to competing browsers. After Opera Mini was rejected from the App Store, it was resubmitted and quickly shot to the top of the charts. The developers of Firefox for mobile gave up entirely, citing "technical and logistical restrictions." The Mac App Store has avoided any such horror stories, with Apple possibly realising the importance of lenient App Store guidelines.

Jan Standal, Opera's VP of Desktop Products, has said that he's "very concerned" over the seventeen-years age limit Apple has placed on the browser. "Seventeen is very young, and I am not sure if, at that age, people are ready to use such an application," Standal said. "It's very fast, you know, and it has a lot of features. I think the download requirement should be at least 18."

Opera notes that its browser is still downloadable from Opera.com, but urges children to "get your parents' permission" before downloading. 

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36 Comments

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So I can download it on the desktop but not the phone. Thank you Apple, you suck. I wouldn't mind having Opera or Firefox on my iPhone.

0sm3l said,
So I can download it on the desktop but not the phone. Thank you Apple, you suck. I wouldn't mind having Opera or Firefox on my iPhone.
Opera Mini is out for iPhone.

"It's very fast, you know, and it has a lot of features. I think the download requirement should be at least 18."

Is he trying to sound snarky or something? Apple just throws a message up for anything that could possibly be used to access pornographic material. That way if parents have software or restrictions in place, a child can't bypass those measures by installing a 3rd party browser.

Shadrack said,
Is he trying to sound snarky or something?

It's a joke. Is that an extremely difficult concept to Apple fanboys?

Borix said,
The age restriction alone make it noteworthy. Apple at its best

All web browsers and RSS feed readers for iOS have the same age restriction. If you were a parent you would understand why.

Jan Standal, Opera's VP of Desktop Products, has said that he's "very concerned" over the seventeen-years age limit Apple has placed on the browser. "Seventeen is very young, and I am not sure if, at that age, people are ready to use such an application," Standal said. "It's very fast, you know, and it has a lot of features. I think the download requirement should be at least 18."

So... this is some kind of joke right. Yes? No?

virtorio said,
So... this is some kind of joke right. Yes? No?

The fact that the AppStore considers the need to place such restrictions on it says more about Apple than it does about Opera taking the **** out it.

It doesn't matter if there's 1% or 95% -- a ****ty browser is a ****ty browser.

Jokes aside, I'm so sick of hearing about "full hardware acceleration" when they all have problems with it. It might be an isolated incident for my machine, but not a single one will "play nice" with HA.

Educated Idiot said,
It doesn't matter if there's 1% or 95% -- a ****ty browser is a ****ty browser.

Jokes aside, I'm so sick of hearing about "full hardware acceleration" when they all have problems with it. It might be an isolated incident for my machine, but not a single one will "play nice" with HA.

what problems? being vague is being vague... I've never seen a problem with hardware acceleration on IE9 at least to this point (I'm aware you arn't talking about IE9, I'm just saying it does work somewhere)

Edited by neufuse, Mar 3 2011, 1:15pm :

Educated Idiot said,
It doesn't matter if there's 1% or 95% -- a ****ty browser is a ****ty browser.

Jokes aside, I'm so sick of hearing about "full hardware acceleration" when they all have problems with it. It might be an isolated incident for my machine, but not a single one will "play nice" with HA.

This'll be the first time anyone's ever really mentioned "full hardware acceleration" in regards to Opera... because they only released an experimental labs build for Windows, with hardware acceleration in the last week - and not a build that's even confirmed for the 11.xx branch at all, it could end up being Opera 12, and probably will be.

On Mac, I don't think there is any browser that has *full* hardware acceleration for all rendering.

neufuse said,

what problems? being vague is being vague... I've never seen a problem with hardware acceleration on IE9 at least to this point (I'm aware you arn't talking about IE9, I'm just saying it does work somewhere)

fuzzy fonts?

bogas04 said,

fuzzy fonts?

Firefox is no better in that respect, and neither will be any browser if they all use DirectWrite down the road.

The only browser with full hardware acceleration (Opera 11.5) on every OS including Linux and XP that supports OpenGL.

Oh and for the trolls who like to point out Opera's market share is like 1% consider how many people 1% of the people online numbers.

JAB Creations said,
The only browser with full hardware acceleration (Opera 11.5) on every OS including Linux and XP that supports OpenGL.

Oh and for the trolls who like to point out Opera's market share is like 1% consider how many people 1% of the people online numbers.

Firefox 4 does it since months now and its close to release (not like Opera 11.5 in like pre alpha stage)

JAB Creations said,
Oh and for the trolls who like to point out Opera's market share is like 1% consider how many people 1% of the people online numbers.

Yes, but it's still 1%

JAB Creations said,

Oh and for the trolls who like to point out Opera's market share is like 1% consider how many people 1% of the people online numbers.

Others have two digit % market share , how big is that number compared to Opera?

JAB Creations said,
The only browser with full hardware acceleration (Opera 11.5) on every OS including Linux and XP that supports OpenGL.

Oh and for the trolls who like to point out Opera's market share is like 1% consider how many people 1% of the people online numbers.

Too bad Opera fails to provide plugin isolation, tab process isolation etc. all the features that, by the time Lion is released people will demand from their browsers. Firefox, Safari and Chrome will all provide such features except for Opera who seem to be like a bad joke out of the 2000s.

Mr Nom Nom's said,

Too bad Opera fails to provide plugin isolation, tab process isolation etc. all the features that, by the time Lion is released people will demand from their browsers. Firefox, Safari and Chrome will all provide such features except for Opera who seem to be like a bad joke out of the 2000s.

You think people will demand that? I think you'd be surprised by how few people understand what you just said...

bogas04 said,

Firefox 4 does it since months now and its close to release (not like Opera 11.5 in like pre alpha stage)

Firefox 4 only does hardware acceleration on Windows. Opera's OpenGL supported backend is meant to work universally.

Heartripper said,
Yes, but it's still 1%
Nope. It's something like 3-5% worldwide (on desktop), and 5-10% in Europe.

Mr Nom Nom's said,
Too bad Opera fails to provide plugin isolation, tab process isolation etc. all the features that, by the time Lion is released people will demand from their browsers.

The people who will demand such things are an extremely small minority. In other words, irrelevant.

Firefox, Safari and Chrome will all provide such features except for Opera who seem to be like a bad joke out of the 2000s.

Why the trolling? Isn't it interesting how Opera is often as fast as hardware accelerated browsers when running in software mode, and now they are getting hardware acceleration, which beats the crap out of both Chrome and Firefox, and ties with IE9?

Mr Nom Nom's said,

Too bad Opera fails to provide plugin isolation, tab process isolation etc. all the features that, by the time Lion is released people will demand from their browsers. Firefox, Safari and Chrome will all provide such features except for Opera who seem to be like a bad joke out of the 2000s.

If you want all those use chrome, all those features are pretty much irrelevant and have no use in opera. im glad opera using none of them.

Heartripper said,
actually 2%, but the point was another

No, the figures that show 2% are demonstrably wrong. Those figures are almost exclusively focused on Western Europe and North America, and hardly count markets where Opera has its real strengths.