Oracle Openworld 2013: Liveblog of the Opening Keynote

Larry Ellison is going to be a happy man. His team won the America's Cup competition today, so the keynote is bound to be even more upbeat than usual. We'll be doing a liveblog of the event, letting you know about announcements as they occur. Let us know if you have any specific questions as we see what Oracle has planned for the year.

Neowin Live - This event has concluded

00:04 Christopher White Welcome to this Neowin.net live event. Coverage will begin shortly.
00:06 Christopher White The keynote is about to begin -- an intro video is playing with exciting music in the background.
00:11 Christopher White Judy Sim, Chief Marketing officer to kick off.
00:12 Christopher White Only 50 people at the first OpenWorld conference
00:12 Christopher White 60,000 attendees this year, 30% outside of NA (145 countries)
00:13 Christopher White If you want to try streaming any of the Keynotes yourself, you can try this link - video isnt live yet though: http://www.oracle.com/openworld/live/on-demand/index.html
00:15 Christopher White Bocce Ball experts will be in Moscone West... Very technical. :D
00:16 Christopher White There's an interactive golf simulator too if you're into that sort of thing - more technical than bocce ball. :)
00:18 Christopher White Talking about the parties now -- the Maroon 5 and Black Keys concert Wednesday night.
00:20 Christopher White Oracle has a "chief sustainability officer?" Are we taking this "eco" thing a little too far? Or is this a good thing?
00:22 Christopher White Talking about America's Cup now.
00:23 Christopher White Just preliminary stuff - talking about San Francisco, how it's a great city for the conference, and how great America's Cup is.
00:27 Christopher White Next up: Chief Corporate Architect from Oracle, Edward Screven
00:27 Christopher White He's announcing the Fujitsu keynote.
00:28 Christopher White First mention of Big Data - take a drink. :)
00:28 Christopher White I really miss how strong Sun/Fujitsu were... Not sure that people want big iron like this anymore though.
00:28 Christopher White Fujitsu obviously hopes I'm wrong. :)
00:29 Christopher White Noriyuko Toyoki, SVP of Fujitsu coming on the stage.
00:29 Christopher White "Shaping Tomorrow Through Modernization and Innovation"
00:29 Christopher White Tokyo hosting the 2020 Olympics.
00:32 Christopher White Elephants in Sri Lanka swim to an island that is now isolated...
00:33 Christopher White Only the smart, courageous, adventurous elephants make that journey.
00:33 Christopher White To ensure our chances of survival, we must be courageous enough to explore opportunities -- innovation.
00:33 Christopher White I'm not sure I got his connection between innovation and elephants, but ok.
00:36 Christopher White Showing an example of filtering Big Data.
00:37 Christopher White After filtering data, we call the results "Valuable Data." Umm, ok.
00:39 Christopher White Computer vs Human in Shogi.
00:39 Christopher White Shogi game is similar to chess - have you heard of it?
00:40 Christopher White Using Big Data to play the game, the computer can take data from over 500,000 past games to decide moves.
00:41 Christopher White You win by getting a triangle, might have to look into it.
00:41 Christopher White A board game is easier to map than a business, but the goal is the same - to beat the competition. Nicely said.
00:43 Christopher White Big Data requires high performance to compute in a short amount of time, and must be flexible and have expandability to do new types of analysis that will be required.
00:43 Christopher White How did Fujitsu design the M10? We'll dig into that.
00:45 Christopher White SAP SD benchmark
00:46 Christopher White Performance: 126,063 users, peak performance = 21 (users/$K)
00:46 Christopher White Twice as good as IBM's machines.
00:46 Christopher White But how can we manage even larger amounts of data?
00:47 Christopher White The in-memory database concept; I've seen banners about that around the conference, big topic.
00:47 Christopher White Hard drive access = ms, memory acccess = nanoseconds
00:47 Christopher White More memory=drastic leap in performance.
00:48 Christopher White Makes sense - and we've been pinning tables in memory for a long time. But memory is getting cheaper.
00:49 Christopher White Throughput performance is important, but so is response performance. How to process big data in realtime.
00:49 Christopher White Most servers offer the same throughput. 4 jobs/second in the example.
00:49 Christopher White Response is how much time each takes.
00:50 Christopher White Fujitsu did two jobs in the time the competitors did 0.
00:50 Christopher White Because Fujitsu servers have better response. So adding more servers adds more response.
00:51 Christopher White That was from the STREAM Benchmark.
00:53 Christopher White Flexibility and expandability also important.
00:53 Christopher White Fujitsu M10 allows CPU core activation and has building blocks
00:54 Christopher White Fujitsu M10-1 includes 16 cores (max)
00:54 Christopher White Activate in increments of 2 without adding hardware.
00:54 Christopher White Fujitsu M10-4 has up to 64 cores.
00:55 Christopher White Fujitsu M10-4S can be used as building blocks.
00:55 Christopher White Activate all 64 cores, then add a second box to the first without interrupting the system.
00:55 Christopher White Can add cores in increments of 2.
00:55 Christopher White Can add up to 16 boxes, 1024 cores, 64TB of memory. WOW!
00:57 Christopher White Software on a chip.
00:58 Christopher White Common routines can be put on hardware to increase speed. This increases speed.
00:59 Christopher White Overall, Fujitsu keynote isn't generating much excitement....
01:00 Christopher White Andrew Mendelsohn, SVP, Oraccle Database Server Technologies (Oracle) coming on stage with Fujitsu.
01:04 Christopher White Said that IO isn't as important with in-memory databases... But I disagree.
01:04 Christopher White So far, this keynote has been a dud, and the crowd seems to agree.
01:04 Christopher White Next up: Customer Cases
01:04 Christopher White I hope Larry can bring this thing back on track when he finally gts on stage.
01:04 Christopher White Talking about Canon printers and cameras...
01:05 Christopher White Canon uses Exalogic, Exadata, and Fujitsu M10
01:08 Christopher White Fujitsu contuing to improve the M10.
01:08 Christopher White CMI - Coherent Memory Interconnect
01:08 Christopher White New technology.
01:09 Christopher White CMI will be able to reduce speed to 1/10th the speed of Infiniband.
01:10 Christopher White Fujitsu booth at Moscone South, Booth #1501.
01:13 Christopher White I wonder how many people are actually using the Fujitsu M10. They lost a ton of market share during the Oracle/Sun acquisition.
01:14 Christopher White @qhardy on Twitter summed up the Fujitsu keynote nicely: If only Michael Jackson had watched Fujitsu talks instead of taking coma-inducing drugs to try and sleep.
01:15 Christopher White Fujitsu ended their portion. Now we get an Oracle video of people excercising. Very un-IT like.
01:17 Christopher White CEO of Oracle, Larry Ellison.
01:17 Christopher White Brand new in-memory option in 12c.
01:18 Christopher White 100x faster queries: real time analytics.
01:18 Christopher White And 2x increase transaction processing rates (insert rows 3-4x faster)
01:20 Christopher White Talking about adding rows into a database... Seems simple enough.
01:21 Christopher White Been around since the beginning of relational databases, so nothing new yet.
01:21 Christopher White Analytics run faster on column format.
01:22 Christopher White Column format databases have been around 5 years or so.
01:22 Christopher White Oracle has a better idea. Dual format in-memory database.
01:22 Christopher White Store both row and column in-memory formats for same data/table.
01:23 Christopher White When you update one, you have to update the other - transactional consistency.
01:24 Christopher White Oracle In-Memory Columnar Technology
01:24 Christopher White How does it work faster when you have to update both row and column??? He'll come back to that question.
01:25 Christopher White Near zero overhead on data changes: OLTP runs faster
01:25 Christopher White Pure in-memory columnar processing: no loggin
01:25 Christopher White Data loaded in-memory for active tables or partitions
01:26 Christopher White Each CPU core scans local in-memory columns. Uses SIMD vector instructions.
01:27 Christopher White That gives you BILLIONS of rows/second scan rate per CPU core.
01:27 Christopher White Converts join processing into fast column scans, improving table join speeds by 10x.
01:30 Christopher White OLTP is slowed down by analytic indexes.
01:31 Christopher White Inserting one row into a table requires 10-20 analytic indexes to be updated: SLOW!
01:31 Christopher White DBA has to guess what queries are going to come up as well.
01:32 Christopher White Column store replaces analytic indexes.
01:33 Christopher White How do you turn on the in memory option in Oracle?
01:33 Christopher White Easy - see screenshot.
01:34 Christopher White Unfortunately, the Exadata was in the way - so we couldn't see the whole command LOL
01:36 Christopher White Christopher White ‏@Fezmid now Larry Ellison: "Just throw a switch and turn on in-memory database. EVERYTHING runs faster without a SINGLE change to the app."
01:37 Christopher White Want to see Fujitsu's slideshow? Here it is: http://www.slideshare.net/Fuji...enworld-2013-fujitsukeynote
01:38 Christopher White Difference between pinning database in memory and using in-memory database? The former is in rows, the latter is columnar based.
01:40 Christopher White 3 billion row table -- every Wikipedia query over the last week of August.
01:41 Christopher White Currently, you need to make index based on what queries the user wants to run.
01:42 Christopher White 1.5 seconds to get 415k results from 3 billion rows with a good index.
01:43 Christopher White A few minutes to get results without an index. Slow for users.
01:46 Christopher White With in-memory option, we get 7 BILLION rows scanned in 1 second.
01:46 Christopher White That's fast.
01:46 Christopher White In-memory speed + capacity of low cost disk.
01:46 Christopher White Data automatically migrates from disk, to flash, to DRAM, based on usage.
01:48 Christopher White Can also scale up -- interprocessor bandwidth far exceeds Infiniband.
01:49 Christopher White Sumary: Extreme performance: Analytics & OLTP, extreme scale-out and scalepup, extreme availability
01:49 Christopher White Announcing the M6-32 - Big Memory Machine
01:50 Christopher White 32TB of DRAM, 32 SPARC M6 chips (2x the cores of the M5);. Fastest in-memory database. Available NOW
01:51 Christopher White M6 has 12 cores per processor, 96 threads per processor
01:51 Christopher White 3TB per second bandwidth
01:52 Christopher White Larry showed a diagram of the chip architecture and joked that he was going to explain each line: "I expect to be done on Wednesday at 4pm." :D
01:53 Christopher White vs the IBM P795, has 2sx memory capacity, 50% more CPU cores, twice the bandwidth, at a fraction of the cost.
01:55 Christopher White Running the wikipedia demo again.
01:55 Christopher White Larry has a titanium watch -- much cheaper than his America's Cup boat. :)
01:55 Christopher White In-memory database scan on the M6-32 -- 341072 million rows/second!!!
01:56 Christopher White Oracle Database Backup, Logging, Recovery Appliance
01:58 Christopher White Larry named it, "that's why I get the big bucks." :D
01:59 Christopher White The appliance scales up to backing up 1000s of databases
02:01 Christopher White Now he says 10s of thousands of databases can be backed up.
02:01 Christopher White Has Exadata technology in the appliance...
02:02 Christopher White You have a little Intel machine, back it up, have Exadata, back that up, have a database on IBM hardware, backs that up.
02:02 Christopher White Has a catelog that keeps track of all of the data. Will even archive it to tape if you want it ot.
02:03 Christopher White Does point in time recovery
02:03 Christopher White Can be on a WAN.
02:04 Christopher White Buy one to backup your databases, then if you want an additional copy, backup to the Oracle cloud.
02:04 Christopher White (Oracle public cloud)
02:04 Christopher White Or buy two appliances and they can replicate between themselves in different datacenters.
02:04 Christopher White This type of device doesn't exist anywhere else.
02:05 Christopher White Datacenter of the future.
02:07 Christopher White Datacenter core: Intel 2 socket servers, virtualized linux, ethernet interconnect. Stuff is cheap, good for everything.
02:07 Christopher White Larry: "The stuff is cheap, but it's NOT good for everything."
02:09 Christopher White Engineered systems are important.
02:10 Christopher White And this ends the keynote. Thanks for following along, and be sure to ask us if you have any questions you'd like to see us find answers for while we're here at Oracle OpenWorld this week!
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14 Comments

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CygnusOrion said,
Oracle has an event? *crickets*

It's just a database people. Nothing to see here, move along.


Oracle has a lot more products than just a database. Plus, there 60,000 people here -- not many tech conferences have this many attendees -- so not everyone shares your thoughts on that.

CygnusOrion said,
Oracle has an event? *crickets*

It's just a database people. Nothing to see here, move along.

1) Oracle does more than 'just databases'.
2) Oracle like IBM and Microsoft run many of the massive web based applications that consumers relying on now and into the future so these improvements trickle down to consumers with better services.

CygnusOrion said,
Oracle has an event? *crickets*

It's just a database people. Nothing to see here, move along.

Yea, it's just one the largest tech conference in the world...nothing to see here.

Izlude said,
Bring Back Open Solaris And Project Looking Glass

Don't be stupid, oracle doesn't care less for things that don't net them billions in revenue.

n_K said,

Don't be stupid, oracle doesn't care less for things that don't net them billions in revenue.

They still do MySQL, Java, Glassfish, and Netbeans among others. OpenSolaris never caught even though it was a great OS. You can still get as Open Indiana.

Spicoli said,
They still do MySQL....

Well now that Google have jumped to that other fork, we'll see.
Seems like they don't to enough MySQL for the community.

Spicoli said,

They still do MySQL, Java, Glassfish, and Netbeans among others. OpenSolaris never caught even though it was a great OS. You can still get as Open Indiana.


MySQL and Java were required to be kept going as part of their commitment to buying sun by regulators, and if you've not noticed, they've purposely messed up mysql which is why the original coders of mysql forked it and improve the forked version and not oracle's mess.

bdsams said,
Oracle is going all in with the announcements.

I was actually surprised that there was no Exadata X4 announcement.