Oracle OpenWorld 2013: Setting up

As the rain fell in San Francisco, CA today, Oracle was busy preparing for their annual conference. From setting up tents to putting up banners to even moving potted plants around, everyone was busy putting things where they belong.

Last year, Oracle's banners focused on the number of customers they had, touting things like, "20 of the top 20 airlines use Oracle." This year, the focus appears to be on how much customers can save by using Oracle. For example, one banner claims that McKesson reduced agreement processing time by over 50%, while another claims Southwest Airlines increased their loyalty program membership by 20% with the help of Oracle software. This seems like a better marketing strategy since it shows actual value to the software stack as opposed to the "follow the leader" mentality.

While the JavaOne portion of the conference started today, the rest of the conference begins tomorrow evening at 8pm ET. We'll be sharing our thoughts on Larry Ellison's keynote announcements live and hope you'll join us for the live blog! Until then, enjoy a few pictures from the Moscone Center.

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just under the list of viruses for windows machines....take a break scrolling the list of viruses every few days and continue scrolling from where you left off when you wake up...

SPEhosting said,
just under the list of viruses for windows machines....take a break scrolling the list of viruses every few days and continue scrolling from where you left off when you wake up...

Oh come on, Oracle's leadership/ownership of Java has been an absolute joke up until National Governments declaring it unsafe and Apple banning versions on OSX.
It's only been since that they have stopped becoming a fortnightly feature under The Register's Security page.

You people do know that Java is not one of Oracle's main products as they don't even make money off of it and the Java plugin is not the main use of Java. Learn beyond what's on your PC. Oracle's money maker is on their database and ERP applications.

Spicoli said,
You people do know that Java is not one of Oracle's main products as they don't even make money off of it and the Java plugin is not the main use of Java. Learn beyond what's on your PC. Oracle's money maker is on their database and ERP applications.

You do know oracle had a huge scare not that long ago right when it was discovered you could connect to an oracle database without supplying login details and have system read and write permissions yes?
Oh and also, oracle database is heavily relialent upon java.

Spicoli said,
You people do know that Java is not one of Oracle's main products as they don't even make money off of it and the Java plugin is not the main use of Java. Learn beyond what's on your PC. Oracle's money maker is on their database and ERP applications.

Oracle Applications/Oracle E-Business Suite, what do you use as a framework for that? Oh yes, Java Runtime Environment.

n_K said,

You do know oracle had a huge scare not that long ago right when it was discovered you could connect to an oracle database without supplying login details and have system read and write permissions yes?
Oh and also, oracle database is heavily relialent upon java.

If you allow anyone outside to connect directly to your database, you don't know what you're doing. The Java issues are related to allowing untrusted code to execute in the java plugin. No one has ever created a secure runtime environment with untrusted code.

Aergan said,

Oracle Applications/Oracle E-Business Suite, what do you use as a framework for that? Oh yes, Java Runtime Environment.

Yea, and that executes internally provided code in trusted mode and is not a security problem. The same for all Java EE servers around the world. Sorry, Java is not just another plugin like flash. We're even getting rid of the pluin in that case and going to webstart.

Spicoli said,

If you allow anyone outside to connect directly to your database, you don't know what you're doing. The Java issues are related to allowing untrusted code to execute in the java plugin. No one has ever created a secure runtime environment with untrusted code.


You'd be an idiot unless for example you needed to run database tasks inside of a company that would run very slow through an intermediatry, and that then creates problems of an internal PC being hacked or a ticked off employee, etc.
There are loads of exploits for java, and if it was as easy as just changing a setting like you've suggested, that'd be the advice every security company and government would give instead of 'REMOVE JAVA ASAP!'