Oracle OpenWorld: Why we're attending

Oracle OpenWorld is one of the largest technology conferences in the world. With over 50,000 attendees, you're sure to be able to find someone who has solved problems similar to yours. Last year we learned about the improvements to the Exadata platform, and how it compared to IBM's HANA offering. The keynotes were also full of useful tidbits of information to help the IT professional.

The conference is once again taking place in San Francisco, California, and will be running from September 22nd through the 26th. We'll be onsite gathering details of all of the latest Oracle offerings, such as the Oracle 12c database, talks on Java security, and we wouldn't be surprised to learn of an update to the Exadata engineered systems. In case you needed help deciding why you should go, Oracle has also put together a video describing all of the great things that happen at OpenWorld. They took customer comments, put them on a tablet, and put the whole piece to music. For example, one customer says, "There's no other place where you can get face to face with so many Oracle experts, and get to talk to so many people who have real experience of using Oracle products." Unfortunately, the video is not quite as exciting as the one they used last year.

Curiously enough, when the tablet spins, you see the "Oracle" logo on the back of what appears to be an iPad. We doubt Oracle is entering the tablet business, but if so, we'll let you know!

Are you attending the conference? Is there anything you're looking forward to hearing about from Larry Ellison?

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Java was a nice prototype, not the real thing, until came .net, then Java became useless junk, a nice idea but a junk implementation.

Then Google came and made the Desktop apps made by Ecma 5 run on any platform, and that made java and .net look like trash.

Sorry, but this is not convincing and you are probably going for free since Oracle is likely paying for your accommodation, food and attendance. Its similar to WWDC and you have to pay big bucks to attend plus plane and hotel accommodation's if you are just a regular.

How do I know this? Because in 2009 I was offered the opportunity to go all expenses paid Oracle World, but my US Visa was expired at the time and I was informed on short notice.

Mr. Dee said,
Sorry, but this is not convincing and you are probably going for free since Oracle is likely paying for your accommodation, food and attendance. Its similar to WWDC and you have to pay big bucks to attend plus plane and hotel accommodation's if you are just a regular.

How do I know this? Because in 2009 I was offered the opportunity to go all expenses paid Oracle World, but my US Visa was expired at the time and I was informed on short notice.


Full disclosure: Oracle paid for the conference pass, but I'm responsible for my own airfare, hotel, and meals.

Java Runtime, the immovable object that thwarts me at nearly every turn during a working day. It is a Hydra of cunning, lies and demonic trickery - Cut off one head, three will rise!; Kill it with FIRE. the flames do nothing!

nothing to be ashamed of. besides. it's good to look for backup sponsors for this site in case microsoft pulls out. and that scenario is looking likelier everyday. lol.

Things you should ask:
- "Aren't you ashamed that the Java runtime still tries to install trashware with every update discouraging people from updating leaving them exposed to vulnerabilities?"
- "Aren't you ashamed that the Java runtime still doesn't have proper automatic updates leaving people exposed to vulnerabilities?"
- "Aren't you ashamed that the Java runtime still doesn't properly straight out block unsigned applets (a warning dialog is NOT enough, it still lets inexpert people easily getting infected)?"
- etc. etc.

Edited by francescob, Sep 14 2013, 4:45pm :

Oracle is B2B company and really isn't that interested in dealing with consumer software. Why deal with uneducated and whiny users if you don't have to? They seem to be pushing for OpenJDK to take over the consumer part.