Original Apple 1 up for auction, expected to fetch £100,000+

Do you want to own a piece of computer history? Do you have lots of extra money lying around?  If so, Christie’s has an auction for you! Up for auction is an original Apple 1 including the original manual, a cassette interface card, shipping box, invoice, and even a letter from Apple founder Steve Jobs himself. The machine is known as the first personal computer that came with a fully assembled motherboard. According to the documentation, the machine originally cost $666.66, with the cassette interface adding an extra $75. It was sold to Electric City Radio Supply in Great Falls, Montana. Christie’s estimates that the lot will sell for £100,000 - £150,000 ($160,300 - $240,450).

The computer is numbered 82 and there were only 200 built. Apple went on to create the Apple II the following year and that model included a built-in keyboard and a casing to house the electronics.

For those of you who don’t have that kind of cash in your checking account, Briel Computers has created a functional clone of the Apple 1 dubbed the replica 1. At only $199, it’s more than $160,101 cheaper than the original thing, and adds extra features like a USB port and an ATX power connector.

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Windows Phone 7 locks-in microSD cards

Next Story

Windows Phone 7 gets the jailbreak treatment

31 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

It's a collector's item, a museum piece as others have said. Folks, it has type-written documentation, and what appears to be the ORIGINAL Apple logo artwork on the manual.

Bigger story is how alot of the Neowin, "tech savy" crowd just don't get what the big deal is! ROFL

People have paid far more for a violin or a baseball.

zkid2010 said,
It's a collector's item, a museum piece as others have said. Folks, it has type-written documentation, and what appears to be the ORIGINAL Apple logo artwork on the manual.

Bigger story is how alot of the Neowin, "tech savy" crowd just don't get what the big deal is! ROFL

People have paid far more for a violin or a baseball.


Hand-crafted violins are more rare, harder to produce and more useful. So what's the big deal? Apple I wasn't a first personal computer. WHo other that hard-core Apple fans or collectors would be interested in BUYING it?

RealFduch said,

Hand-crafted violins are more rare, harder to produce and more useful. So what's the big deal? Apple I wasn't a first personal computer. WHo other that hard-core Apple fans or collectors would be interested in BUYING it?

and the 6 figure baseballs? Jerseys? Cmon. You just proved my point. Who other than hard-core whatever indeed. Does it really matter what the item is when history is involved or an item with historical significance, like the Apple-I? Now, if you dispute the historical significance of that item in the auction, call Christies and let them know how ridiculous the price is. I'm sure they'll facepalm your input much like I did.

zkid2010 said,

and the 6 figure baseballs? Jerseys? Cmon. You just proved my point. Who other than hard-core whatever indeed. Does it really matter what the item is when history is involved or an item with historical significance, like the Apple-I? Now, if you dispute the historical significance of that item in the auction, call Christies and let them know how ridiculous the price is. I'm sure they'll facepalm your input much like I did.

An item is worth whatever someone is willing to pay, simple as that.

Sylar2010 said,

Like all Apple products, its all there good for.

Not bad.

I couldn't buy collectors items, Id eventually just find a hole to cram them in and they'd just decay over time. >_>

stablemist said,
Anyone who buys it is an idiot.
What a stupid comment. It's a collector's item, it appreciates in value. An appreciating asset is just about the most worthwhile thing money can buy.

Fry said,
What a stupid comment. It's a collector's item, it appreciates in value. An appreciating asset is just about the most worthwhile thing money can buy.

Although I mostly agree with you, collectables don't always appreciate in value. Different collectables are hot at different times and collectors who want to make money off their collections have to time the market right. Look at baseball cards and comics over the past few years... the time to sell was early 2000's, not now.

Fry said,
What a stupid comment. It's a collector's item, it appreciates in value. An appreciating asset is just about the most worthwhile thing money can buy.

Collector's item? Are you serious??? It's outdated computer junk... period! I see this kind of stuff get thrown in the dumpsters every day. Get me a Rembrandt painting, that's something I'd want to display in my living room.

superconductive said,

Collector's item? Are you serious??? It's outdated computer junk... period! I see this kind of stuff get thrown in the dumpsters every day. Get me a Rembrandt painting, that's something I'd want to display in my living room.

You do not see Apple I computers thrown in the dumpster every day. If you cannot see the difference between a historic computer, limited in number and built by hand by the founders of one of the most recognizable tech companies in the world today and a Dell Pentium II desktop then I don't know what to say other than that's pretty ignorant. Also one could say a Rembrandt is just a stupid old painting by some long dead guy going by your lack of logic.

JHH said,
But does it run Crysis?
I was wondering if it would run Photoshop myself. I mean, come on,...time to put that 8kb of RAM to use!!

lol when I first read this I thought you meant an Apple Iphone or Ipod 1st generation and died alittle on the inside thinking about how ridiculous it is. Realized I am just stupid. Geeze