OS X 10.9 coming at WWDC, focuses on the power user

Apple's OS X is the foundation for its laptops and desktops but over the years, the line between OS X and iOS has become a bit blurred. While many expect that OS X 10.9 will likely include several features to bring the two platforms even closer together, we are now getting our first look at what OS X 10.9 will likely bring to the platform.

According to 9to5mac, who has a solid track record on these types of rumors, 10.9 will be focused more on the power user and should bring about several enhancements that many have been asking for. The first item will likely be tabbed windows for Finder and the inclusion of tags which will make finding your information on your machine, much easier. 

In addition to the Finder enhancement, Safari will receive a large update on the back-end and multi-monitor support will also be improved as well. While some may be hoping for a large visual overhaul, the report states that only minor tweaks will be present this time around.

It was previously stated that 10.9 would likely include Siri as well, the report states that this information is not yet confirmed and Apple could hold the feature for newer machines, much like it did with some Airplay functionality and Siri on the iPhone 4/4S.

With the conference kicking off in June, we don't have much longer to wait to see what Apple's latest OS, has to offer.

Source: 9to5Mac

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Google Now available on iOS

Next Story

Microsoft pokes fun of the fanboys in new Windows Phone advert

60 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

I hope they improve general window management. The Dock performs poorly in this area.

It would be great if the static menu bar went, and menu bars where place in windows instead (or replaced with a ribbon-like interface).

Please, no Start screen equivalent.

Depends on what you get used to I suppose, I much prefer having the menu at the top.
And yes, the Dock is useless at managing multiple application windows, but that's what Mission Control/Expose is for.

To me most Mac and iDevice users are those not too tech savvy and want a no-frills restricted kind of computing.

I would say Linux users give a more 'power user' impression.
Then Windows is in between

Eh, between spotlight and colored labels, I'm not sure what tags and a tabbed Finder is really going to add.

I mean, I don't want to database all of my data, I want to say "where is this file that's kind of like this?" and have Spotlight find it. If I want to database things, I'll do that in Evernote.

Apple and Power Users in same sentence, lol. Of course they will add this to their marketing schtick, not that they have anything to sing about.

I have moved away from Apple computer hardware after two very bad experiences. However I miss OS X like you miss an extremely hot and lusty ex-gf.

sanctified said,
I have moved away from Apple computer hardware after two very bad experiences. However I miss OS X like you miss an extremely hot and lusty ex-gf.

and like most extremely hot ex-gf's... they where extremely bitchy and snobbish

"While some may be hoping for a large visual overhaul, the report states that only minor tweaks will be present this time around."

Why do so many people want a UI overhaul of any OS? Just add features, not change the UI every 2 years. The UI works for the desktop enviornment. I fail to see how (as some people put it), Windows 7 is a horrible old dated UI that HAS....HAS to be changed.....It works on the desktop. No point in changing the UI.

xWhiplash said,
"While some may be hoping for a large visual overhaul, the report states that only minor tweaks will be present this time around."

Why do so many people want a UI overhaul of any OS? Just add features, not change the UI every 2 years. The UI works for the desktop enviornment. I fail to see how (as some people put it), Windows 7 is a horrible old dated UI that HAS....HAS to be changed.....It works on the desktop. No point in changing the UI.

oh common... Skeuomorphic UI's are so 1990's..... please doll, lets make this thing minimalistic </end hipster rant>

honestly though, there are some people who think windows and mac should look like the startrek TNG computers..... jus because!

xWhiplash said,
"While some may be hoping for a large visual overhaul, the report states that only minor tweaks will be present this time around."

Why do so many people want a UI overhaul of any OS? Just add features, not change the UI every 2 years. The UI works for the desktop enviornment. I fail to see how (as some people put it), Windows 7 is a horrible old dated UI that HAS....HAS to be changed.....It works on the desktop. No point in changing the UI.


Aye men to that! Both Windows 7 and OS X have matured to a very polished level, and although some minor tweaks would be welcome here and there, the overall OS's only need more features, and not overhauls.

The same can be said with iOS and WP8... They really only need new features, and slight UI and UX tweaks, because they are already great at what they do, and people are comfortable with them, and not everyone likes to be forced to re-learn something all the time.

"focuses on the power user"

I just knew they would treat the perception of Windows 8 as an opportunity to make a land-grab for desktop use

mdtaUK said,
"focuses on the power user"

I just knew they would treat the perception of Windows 8 as an opportunity to make a land-grab for desktop use

Can't blame them, the fail of windows 8 far surpasses that of any other os that Microsoft has ever released in their entire history as a company.
The time for apple to act is now, sadly tho apple will never get much further than they already are due to their insane high costs.

Apple isn't that expensive. Some of their computers like the MacBook Air are cheaper than a lot of Windows Ultrabooks.

Ace said,
Apple isn't that expensive. Some of their computers like the MacBook Air are cheaper than a lot of Windows Ultrabooks.

This is true, I was thinking more along the lines of their mac pro but the MacBook air really is competitively priced.

Ace said,
Apple isn't that expensive. Some of their computers like the MacBook Air are cheaper than a lot of Windows Ultrabooks.
Also spec'd lesser than many Windows Ultrabooks in many cases as well.

Order_66 said,

This is true, I was thinking more along the lines of their mac pro but the MacBook air really is competitively priced.

With Apple you always have trade-off...something you don't have with Windows. Example..

Compare the Hp Spectre XY to the Mac Air for $999
The Air you have to take an 11" screen vs the Spectre which starts with 13"
The Air has a 64GB SSD while the Spectre XT has 128GB
Both have the exact same CPU 1.7GHz i5 that Turboboost to 2.6Ghz
Both have 4GB of RAM
The Spectre has an internal NIC while the Air uses a stupid dongle you could easily lose.
The Spectre has USB 3.0, the Air doesn't and it doesn't even have the Thunderbolt port
The Spectre has a card reader the Air doesn't
The rsolution is the same, biut being a smaller screens means everything will be smaller.
Both have the same GPU, but only Windows has DirectX which blows OSX out the water for gaming. Windows on the Mac still pales in comparision
The Spectre is heavier...but it does have a 13" screen.
The Spoectre has an HDMI port, with the Mac you have to spend money for a fancy one to work with the Mac andI could go on.

The reality is, you have to go beyond just the retail price. The extras you have to buy to do standard things makes the mac less competitive in price when you consider how you plan to use a computer.

TechieXP said,
With Apple you always have trade-off...something you don't have with Windows. Example..

Compare the Hp Spectre XY to the Mac Air for $999
The Air you have to take an 11" screen vs the Spectre which starts with 13"
The Air has a 64GB SSD while the Spectre XT has 128GB
Both have the exact same CPU 1.7GHz i5 that Turboboost to 2.6Ghz
Both have 4GB of RAM
The Spectre has an internal NIC while the Air uses a stupid dongle you could easily lose.
The Spectre has USB 3.0, the Air doesn't and it doesn't even have the Thunderbolt port
The Spectre has a card reader the Air doesn't
The rsolution is the same, biut being a smaller screens means everything will be smaller.
Both have the same GPU, but only Windows has DirectX which blows OSX out the water for gaming. Windows on the Mac still pales in comparision
The Spectre is heavier...but it does have a 13" screen.
The Spoectre has an HDMI port, with the Mac you have to spend money for a fancy one to work with the Mac andI could go on.

The reality is, you have to go beyond just the retail price. The extras you have to buy to do standard things makes the mac less competitive in price when you consider how you plan to use a computer.

Great comparison! I am seriously thinking of getting the HP Envy as my next laptop.

TechieXP said,
With Apple you always have trade-off...something you don't have with Windows. Example..

Compare the Hp Spectre XY to the Mac Air for $999

The Spectre has USB 3.0, the Air doesn't and it doesn't even have the Thunderbolt port

Did you not bother to look at the bolded part of the tech specs?

http://www.apple.com/macbookair/specs.html

Brian Miller said,
Hope they introduce better memory management.

Not sure what version of OSX or issue you're experiencing, as I've had excellent memory management and performance since 10.8.2, and it only got better in .3.

only way to enhance finder is to redo the darn thing.... I still hate Finder, have hated it from its incarnation all the way to current

and hold siri for newer machines? seriously? is standardized overpowered hardware already not enough? oh right lets just milk the hardware end for money and lock a feature to a specific subset of hardware we define at the machine id / cupid / etc level

I'm not excusing it, but I wouldn't be surprised if they did reserve Siri for newer machines. They make their money on hardware after all.

Reserving Siri for newer machines would be silly since pretty much any Intel Mac has more than enough power to "run" Siri

Rudy said,
Reserving Siri for newer machines would be silly since pretty much any Intel Mac has more than enough power to "run" Siri

Powerful enough, but oh you know Apple will probably embed some key or ID into their newer EFI BIOSes so the OS will only let it work on "newer" hardware...

I wouldn't call multi tabbed file exploring a power user feature but anyway the finder application needs as much attention as it can get, it is worse than any file manager I've use on Linux or UNIX sometimes I end up just using Terminal to get stuff done.

ingramator said,
I wouldn't call multi tabbed file exploring a power user feature but anyway the finder application needs as much attention as it can get, it is worse than any file manager I've use on Linux or UNIX sometimes I end up just using Terminal to get stuff done.

What things do you find difficult to accomplish using the Finder?

Mr Nom Nom's said,

What things do you find difficult to accomplish using the Finder?

Idk about him, but it's always frustrating for me to even figure out what path I'm currently in and use that (for example to copy and paste or edit directly), and get to another folder by typing its location.

To show what path you're currently in go: View > Show Path Bar. This puts a bar at the bottom of every window that shows the current path. You can drag and drop items from the path bar into terminal (to enter the path), or drag/drop files into the path bar to copy/move to that folder.

To get to another folder by typing it's location, press Cmd+Shift+G (if the shortcut is too long, remap it from system preferences).

This pops down a text-entry field where you can type a path. It even has tab-autocomplete.

CSharp. said,

What would you call it then?

I would call it a standard feature that all users will use... If it is being implemented only for the minority of us Mac power users then I think thats a bit stupid. And yes I am pained by the things Pluto has mentioned as well as things like walling library and making it a pain to just browse network file shares, the lack of an address bar has to be its weakest point though.

cyberdrone2000 said,
To show what path you're currently in go: View > Show Path Bar. This puts a bar at the bottom of every window that shows the current path. You can drag and drop items from the path bar into terminal (to enter the path), or drag/drop files into the path bar to copy/move to that folder.

To get to another folder by typing it's location, press Cmd+Shift+G (if the shortcut is too long, remap it from system preferences).

This pops down a text-entry field where you can type a path. It even has tab-autocomplete.

Ahh I didn't know. I don't actually have a Mac, I just use my dad's for testing stuff ;D And I knew about the "Goto Location..." (or whatever it's called) but yeahhhh much more difficult than it has to be. Windows does have autocomplete for the location bar too btw, I rely heavily on that

Mr Nom Nom's said,

What things do you find difficult to accomplish using the Finder?

Bulk rename, and finding duplicate files.

Mac OS9 Finder was pretty good. It's been over a decade and I still miss the ability to dock folders to the edges of the screen. They were so springy and convenient!

Well they did get to sit back and watch what happened when Microsoft ignored the power users. They got to see the do's and don'ts. Seeing how there have been quite a few of them talking about switching over to the Mac, it would be a good idea to cater to the potential swarm in 10.9.

Edited by warwagon, Apr 29 2013, 3:44pm :

Windows 8 has far more "power user" features than 7 - Storage Spaces, File History, Hyper-V, native ISO and virtual HDD support, much improved Task Manager, better multi monitor support, way more keyboard shortcuts, even File Explorer has more features...

<snip>

Edited by Brian M., Apr 29 2013, 6:24pm :

W32.Backdoor.KillAV.E said,
Windows 8 has far more "power user" features than 7 - Storage Spaces, File History, Hyper-V, native ISO and virtual HDD support, much improved Task Manager, better multi monitor support, way more keyboard shortcuts, even File Explorer has more features...

With all it's power features, Windows 8 still makes me want to vomit every day. Unlike others I'm not bitching and moaning about not going to upgrade because of some Start Menu - I can personally care less about that. But the fact that the desktop UI is butt ugly (painful to look at) and the modern apps and UI are absolute garbage on anything but a phone or tablet will not change.

I'm actually looking at getting a MacBook Pro and running Windows inside a virtual machine at this point. I can care less about using Windows for anything but running visual studio anymore and that can be accomplished by a simple VM easily...

Edited by Brian M., Apr 29 2013, 6:53pm :

Obry said,
the modern apps and UI are absolute garbage on anything but a phone or tablet

You know you don't have to use the metro apps? Every program that ran on the desktop in previous versions of Windows will still work in Windows 8.

THolman said,
Ironically, OS X has had most of those 'power user' functions built in for years.

Well if you want to bring this stuff up then...

OS X recently just got TRIM support for SSD's, an important feature that Windows has had for years. It's also only just got the ability in Lion to make apps fullscreen (lol!). It's multi-monitor support isn't even as good as Windows XP (all other monitors become unusable/disabled when you use the new fullscreen feature). It still don't support multiple GPU's. It also don't even support OpenGL 4.0 ... something Windows has supported for years, meaning Apple has nothing that can come close to DirectX 11.

And my favourite... OS X Lion just gained the ability to resize a window from any corner.

Yes, OS X truely is for power users /s

W32.Backdoor.KillAV.E said,
....

They [OSX] had an ASLR implementation before Windows......
Just sayin.
but bang for the buck, Windows offers better value.

Ace said,

You know you don't have to use the metro apps? Every program that ran on the desktop in previous versions of Windows will still work in Windows 8.

Thank you for the insight but I don't want to have said apps fed in my face. I don't want any modern, touch-optimized crap on my desktop that doesn't and never will have touch anything. And I don't want the desktop UI to follow the modern UI as if it's some afterthought. If I'm going to spend all day behind a computer, I want the UI to be well designed and pleasant to look at. At present time, it is impossible to make the desktop pleasant to look at. And that's all because of the modern aspect of the UI which takes center place no matter how you look at it.

W32.Backdoor.KillAV.E said,

Well if you want to bring this stuff up then...

OS X recently just got TRIM support for SSD's, an important feature that Windows has had for years. It's also only just got the ability in Lion to make apps fullscreen (lol!). It's multi-monitor support isn't even as good as Windows XP (all other monitors become unusable/disabled when you use the new fullscreen feature). It still don't support multiple GPU's. It also don't even support OpenGL 4.0 ... something Windows has supported for years, meaning Apple has nothing that can come close to DirectX 11.

And my favourite... OS X Lion just gained the ability to resize a window from any corner.

Yes, OS X truely is for power users /s

You were talking about features inherent to Windows 8. That's also what I was talking about. As far as that stuff goes, full screen apps are not new to Lion - it just handles them differently now. Window management is a lot different on OS X, so it's kind of hard to explain how it has changed, but let's just say that there's a universal way of doing it now, whereas there was not a universal way of doing it before. When they talk about the 'new' full screen, it's very different from having one app just taking over the whole screen, since it's integrated into Mission Control. It basically acts like an extra desktop.

As far as TRIM and all of that goes, Apple designs their OS for their hardware, so they don't generally software features that their hardware doesn't need. I'm not saying it's perfect, I've got nitpicks with both systems, I just like OS X way better than Windows 8, and I also know that OS X already has most of those features you cited as being new to Windows 8. If you want to talk about having stuff earlier, OS X has opened isos since day one!

W32.Backdoor.KillAV.E said,

...
Full screen != Maximised window. Windows only just got full screen apps as well, they're called Modern apps.

And OSX is had 'full screen" apps longer than Windows, they're way easier to deal with than they are in Windows (with features like Mission Control), and Apple didn't have to create an entirely new platform to implement them.

THolman said,

You were talking about features inherent to Windows 8. That's also what I was talking about. As far as that stuff goes, full screen apps are not new to Lion - it just handles them differently now. Window management is a lot different on OS X, so it's kind of hard to explain how it has changed, but let's just say that there's a universal way of doing it now, whereas there was not a universal way of doing it before. When they talk about the 'new' full screen, it's very different from having one app just taking over the whole screen, since it's integrated into Mission Control. It basically acts like an extra desktop.

As far as TRIM and all of that goes, Apple designs their OS for their hardware, so they don't generally software features that their hardware doesn't need. I'm not saying it's perfect, I've got nitpicks with both systems, I just like OS X way better than Windows 8, and I also know that OS X already has most of those features you cited as being new to Windows 8. If you want to talk about having stuff earlier, OS X has opened isos since day one!

X86 isnt Apple's hardware. If u mean the os takes on the style of how the mac looks then yes. Apple's who objective with osx is to tey to be so different from Windows. They do stuff backwards. Windows is a real power user os. I mean of u draw pictures and make music, what power features do you really need?

THolman said,
Ironically, OS X has had most of those 'power user' functions built in for years.

The multi monitor support in OS X was horrible for me. Windows gets it right and actually remembers the settings unlike OS X, which changed my primary display to the monitor I just turned off.

Not sure if OS X has storage pools yet, but I know it had pretty good ISO and virtual disk image support, so I'll give it that.

Enron said,

The multi monitor support in OS X was horrible for me. Windows gets it right and actually remembers the settings unlike OS X, which changed my primary display to the monitor I just turned off.

Not sure if OS X has storage pools yet, but I know it had pretty good ISO and virtual disk image support, so I'll give it that.

I'll be honest, I don't use a multiminitor setup. I use both OSes regularly, but I don't know enough about that feature to comment. There's some things I prefer on both of them. But as far as power usage goes, there's another great function OS X has: Unix. It has a much more powerful terminal than Windows, if you're into that sort of thing. Automator is pretty cool, too.